Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

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Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

#1  Postby kennyc » Jan 07, 2013 12:30 pm

Interesting:


Wide Binary Stars Wreak Havoc in Planetary Systems, Astrophysicists Find

Jan. 6, 2013 — An international team of astrophysicists has shown that planetary systems with very distant binary stars are particularly susceptible to violent disruptions, more so than if they had stellar companions with tighter orbits around them.

Unlike the Sun, many stars are members of binary star systems -- where two stars orbit one another -- and these stars' planetary systems can be altered by the gravity of their companion stars. The orbits of very distant or wide stellar companions often become very eccentric -- ie. less circular -- over time, driving the once-distant star into a plunging orbit that passes very close to the planets once per orbital period. The gravity of this close-passing companion can then wreak havoc on planetary systems, triggering planetary scatterings and even ejections.

"The stellar orbits of wide binaries are very sensitive to disturbances from other passing stars as well as the tidal field of the Milky Way," said Nathan Kaib, lead author of a study published January 6 in Nature describing the findings. "This causes their stellar orbits to constantly change their eccentricity -- their degree of circularity. If a wide binary lasts long enough, it will eventually find itself with a very high orbital eccentricity at some point in its life.

When a wide binary orbit becomes very eccentric, the two stars will pass very close together once per orbit on one side of the orbital ellipse, while being very far apart on the other side of the ellipse. This can have dire consequences for planets in these systems since the gravity of a close-passing star can radically change planetary orbits around the other star, causing planets to scatter off of one another and sometimes get ejected to interstellar space.

....

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 145751.htm
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Re: Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

#2  Postby Cito di Pense » Jan 07, 2013 1:03 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-body_problem

Two of the bodies are the stars in the binary system. The third is the planet whose orbit you are trying to compute.

It is not clear that our solar system is definitively not binary. There may be a dark body a couple of times larger than Jupiter out there somewhere. If its orbit relative to the solar system CM is a bit eccentric, then we might not yet have had the opportunity to measure perturbations of planetary orbits influenced by it. Scientific measurements have only been made over about the last 500 years or so. Civilisation exists by geological (and astrophysical) consent, to paraphrase Will Durant.

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Re: Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

#3  Postby kennyc » Jan 07, 2013 1:20 pm

Cito di Pense wrote:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-body_problem

Two of the bodies are the stars in the binary system. The third is the planet whose orbit you are trying to compute.

It is not clear that our solar system is definitively not binary. There may be a dark body a couple of times larger than Jupiter out there somewhere. If its orbit relative to the solar system CM is a bit eccentric, then we might not yet have had the opportunity to measure perturbations of planetary orbits influenced by it. Scientific measurements have only been made over about the last 500 years or so. Civilisation exists by geological (and astrophysical) consent, to paraphrase Will Durant.

ScienceDaily is not a science site, but a news and sensationalism site. You will not learn science there, but only get stirred up. They are trying to sell advertising.


What ignorance. If there were a "dark body" bigger than Jupiter we would have measured its effect. Nor is this article in any way about our solar system. You are as wrong in your speculations as are your misguided attacks on my posts. I have no idea what kind of chip you have on your shoulder about science news sites, but it is apparently keeping your mind closed and breeding hatred. Good luck with that.
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Re: Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

#4  Postby Cito di Pense » Jan 07, 2013 1:38 pm

kennyc wrote:What ignorance. If there were a "dark body" bigger than Jupiter we would have measured its effect.


Do you have a source for this confidence? Do you understand how small the perturbations by a distant body would be? Do you understand that we have only been making precise orbital observations within the solar system for a few years?

The article you cited, in fact, pointed out specifically how orbital eccentricities could affect our capacity to make such measurements within our solar system. Ask 'your son, the astrophysicist'.

Your reaction was completely OTT. What happened? Did someone filch the plastic whistle prize from your box of Corn Flakes?
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Re: Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

#5  Postby kennyc » Jan 07, 2013 1:45 pm

No YOUR REACTION is what is off base, and not limited to this thread, you've done exactly the same thing on multiple threads I've posted like this one. You clearly have an issue of some kind, some chip on your shoulder and just want to be argumentative. Well you are not going to get it from me, but I will point out your off target pseudo attacks such as all your posts in this thread so far.

Now if you have some actual comment about the article in question, some objection to the science in it, you are welcome to discuss it, but you haven't done so yet.
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Re: Binary Stars can eject planets into interstellar space

#6  Postby Cito di Pense » Jan 07, 2013 2:06 pm

kennyc wrote:
Now if you have some actual comment about the article in question, some objection to the science in it, you are welcome to discuss it, but you haven't done so yet.


This is where I find fault in the article:

Unlike the Sun, many stars are members of binary star systems


The comment simply assumes that the sun is not a member of a binary. Even if the sun has no binary companion, the long-term stability of orbital dynamics in the solar system has been debunked long since by the mathematics of the three-body problem. Part of the fallout (no pun intended) of this state of affairs is the history of post accretion impacts evidenced on most of the solid-surface bodies of the solar system.

kennyc wrote:
HughMcB wrote:Europa? It's the most likely place we'll find life in our solar system.



Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

:grin:


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