New human organ found?

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New human organ found?

#1  Postby Animavore » Mar 28, 2018 3:19 pm

Called 'interstitium'.

Newly identified networks of interconnected, fluid-filled chambers that line tissues throughout the human body may qualify as a completely new organ, researchers report in a study published Tuesday in Scientific Reports.

Researchers found the web-like tissue on the underside of skin, around the digestive tract, bladder, lungs, arteries, and within muscles. They speculate that the tissues—dubbed the “interstitium”—may act as “shock absorbers,” allowing our organs to swell and compress as we go about our business of breathing, eating, and living in general. The fluid it contains may also play heretofore unappreciated roles in basic biology and disease. For instance, the liquid could act as a conduit for cellular signals or harmful molecules, play a role in the development of edema (excessive fluid retention in tissues), and even help cancer cells spread.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/arstechnic ... r/%3famp=1
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Re: New human organ found?

#2  Postby Calilasseia » Mar 28, 2018 3:29 pm

New Scientist also has an article (with link to the paper) covering this, and its possible role in cancer metastasis.

EDIT: article is here, and the paper is a free download from here.
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Re: New human organ found?

#3  Postby truelgbt » Sep 12, 2018 9:03 pm

Possibly a new feature discovered in tissue but most likely seen and known about before.

My conclusion: Nothing new here...
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