Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

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Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#1  Postby rationalityiscorrect » Sep 08, 2019 3:13 am

https://www.jneurosci.org/content/early ... 03-19.2019
I found this study interesting, it shows how we molded dog's biology according to specific tasks, maybe, in the future, we could alter brains more profoundly.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#2  Postby lpetrich » Oct 31, 2019 8:09 pm

That's very interesting - different dogs' masters bred them for proficiency at different tasks.

INTELLIGENCE OF DOGS - The ranking by breed - in particular, trainability and obedience. Dogs vary widely.

Understanding of New Commands: Less than 5 repetitions.
Obey First Command: 95% of the time or better.

Understanding of New Commands: 5 to 15 repetitions.
Obey First Command: 85% of the time or better.

Understanding of New Commands: 15 to 25 repetitions.
Obey First Command: 70% of the time or better.

Understanding of New Commands: 25 to 40 repetitions.
Obey First Command: 50% of the time or better.

Understanding of New Commands: 40 to 80 repetitions.
Obey First Command: 30% of the time or better.

Understanding of New Commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more.
Obey First Command: 25% of the time or worse.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#3  Postby Spearthrower » Oct 31, 2019 8:23 pm

Missed the OP before, marking now to read later.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#4  Postby The_Metatron » Oct 31, 2019 9:50 pm

Border Collies are first on the list, and I know why. The fuckers are studying our ways. Later, Jimmy no doubt will tell Tam what he learned.

They organize.

DF150E18-4D05-426F-A8AB-9B7D5FF336F3.jpeg
Jimmy, the Border Collie
DF150E18-4D05-426F-A8AB-9B7D5FF336F3.jpeg (760.63 KiB) Viewed 174 times
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#5  Postby lpetrich » Nov 01, 2019 2:34 am

Dogs seems to me to be a valuable resource for genetics and evolution research. They have a lot of variety, and this variety emerged very quickly by geological standards. Like:
  • Size
  • Snout length
  • Ear stiffness
  • Leg length
  • Hair length
  • Hair curliness
  • Color: (gray) white black yellow orange brown
  • Color pattern: (solid) spots
  • Skin wrinkliness
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#6  Postby The_Piper » Nov 01, 2019 4:32 am

The_Metatron wrote:Border Collies are first on the list, and I know why. The fuckers are studying our ways. Later, Jimmy no doubt will tell Tam what he learned.

They organize.

DF150E18-4D05-426F-A8AB-9B7D5FF336F3.jpeg

He was watching how to videos on your computer. :mrgreen: :heart:
I've never known a border collie unfortunately.

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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#7  Postby zulumoose » Nov 01, 2019 2:26 pm

No surprise with the border collie, but the most obedient dogs I have known have been staffies, and they are ranked surprisingly low. Many people think they are dumb, but they are very keen to please and responsive to their owners.
I am surprised beagles and bloodhounds are in the lowest group, I thought they would perform well, though I have never really known any.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#8  Postby scott1328 » Nov 01, 2019 2:50 pm

I have trained three dogs in AKC obedience. By far, the easiest to train was my Border Collie Zeke. He learned in a few weeks what my previous dog, Rascal, a shetland sheepdog, took years to master. The first dog I trained, a rough collie, had no aptitude for AKC obedience whatsoever and was a literal lovable dumb blonde.

Although Zeke was very easy to train; he was eager to please and had extreme focus. He very much disliked training around other dogs and he very much disliked allowing the obedience instructor/judge to touch him. His overall anxiety only worsened over time even as his performance improved. I made the decision to retire him from obedience training, because it was supposed to be fun and challenging for Zeke but he had grown to dread it. This was disappoining for me because my sheltie had enjoyed it and did well in competition. Rascal's career was cut short when a degenerative disease made him unable to jump while we were competing to earn his UD (utility dog) title.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#9  Postby Spearthrower » Nov 01, 2019 3:11 pm

My obedience training with my cat has met with mixed results. She has learned to stop doing what she's doing when I shout and furiously wave my arms... sometimes.

Perhaps slightly more often, my energetic response seems to be the intended result of her actions and I'm left wondering if I am passing her pet human obedience training.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#10  Postby Fallible » Nov 01, 2019 3:49 pm

Hmm, the greyhound is in the average working intelligence group, apparently obeying first command 50% of the time. My experience is after 4 years, Charles has yet to master the mysterious art of responding to ‘sit’ 10% of the time. And yet...and yet...he responds to first command to “come here” around 75% of the time, and whistle recall is about the same. I read that sitting is not a natural position for the fat arsed gonks of the dog world, so maybe that’s something to do with it.

Mongrels I guess are a mixed bag. Zeb appears to be very quick. He learns a new command in about 10 minutes, and retains it well. The problem is he is not reliable - not through density, but through unauthorised independent thought. Terrier x = reliably-work-alone dog. So if he decides your reason for wanting him to “come here” isn’t good enough, he won’t.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#11  Postby The_Piper » Nov 01, 2019 4:51 pm

Learning and responding to commands is an interesting way to rank intelligence, but it can't be the be all end all of it. Also there is significant variation among individuals. Dogs in particular have wide variance in many ways.
Golden retrievers have friendly temperament as a group, yet mailmen still have to avoid plenty of individuals due to their threatening behavior.
Plus Snoopy's no dummy. :snooty:
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#12  Postby The_Metatron » Nov 01, 2019 8:56 pm

Fallible wrote:Hmm, the greyhound is in the average working intelligence group, apparently obeying first command 50% of the time. My experience is after 4 years, Charles has yet to master the mysterious art of responding to ‘sit’ 10% of the time. And yet...and yet...he responds to first command to “come here” around 75% of the time, and whistle recall is about the same. I read that sitting is not a natural position for the fat arsed gonks of the dog world, so maybe that’s something to do with it.

Mongrels I guess are a mixed bag. Zeb appears to be very quick. He learns a new command in about 10 minutes, and retains it well. The problem is he is not reliable - not through density, but through unauthorised independent thought. Terrier x = reliably-work-alone dog. So if he decides your reason for wanting him to “come here” isn’t good enough, he won’t.

Yep, my two border collies do that sometimes.

I found out recently I can call my dogs off from chasing a squirrel with a word. They will stop the chase at a command. It’s terribly impressive. Particularly since they want that squirrel to die in the worst way.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#13  Postby Hermit » Nov 01, 2019 8:57 pm

This dog, a Maltese mix, has to be in the bottom 0.1% of the trainability scale.

Image

In the ten years, or so, since she has been palmed off on me Chloe has learnt to obey the "sit" command approximately 50% of the time - provided I bribe her with a cat kibble. At all other times she looks straight at my face uncomprehendingly while wagging her tail. If she had a second brain it would be a lonely one.
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Re: Study about neurological variation among dog breeds

#14  Postby rationalityiscorrect » Nov 02, 2019 1:47 am

This topic has gotten popular
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