T. rex: substantially slower than 32mph

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T. rex: substantially slower than 32mph

#1  Postby Sidewalk » Aug 02, 2017 8:35 pm

I found this paper to be an interesting one.

https://peerj.com/articles/3420/

Conclusion:

The results presented demonstrate that the range of speeds predicted by earlier biomechanical models for T. rex locomotion include speeds that would apply greater loads to the skeleton than it would have been able to withstand. These high load speeds can therefore be excluded from our predictions and this means that the possible range of maximum speeds has been greatly reduced and essentially limits adults of this species to walking gaits.


Essentially, if Tyrannosaurus rex tried to run, it would disintegrate.

That John Hammond was full of shite!
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Re: T. rex: substantially slower than 32mph

#2  Postby rplatell » Aug 03, 2017 3:46 am

Sidewalk wrote:I found this paper to be an interesting one.

https://peerj.com/articles/3420/

Conclusion:

The results presented demonstrate that the range of speeds predicted by earlier biomechanical models for T. rex locomotion include speeds that would apply greater loads to the skeleton than it would have been able to withstand. These high load speeds can therefore be excluded from our predictions and this means that the possible range of maximum speeds has been greatly reduced and essentially limits adults of this species to walking gaits.


Essentially, if Tyrannosaurus rex tried to run, it would disintegrate.

That John Hammond was full of shite!


That's why you have to create a hybrid mutant clone with Velociraptor duh! More speed.
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Re: T. rex: substantially slower than 32mph

#3  Postby theropod » Aug 03, 2017 2:23 pm

There are issues with this study. Do I think Tyrannosaurus rex could run at 32 MPH? I don't think it needed to. If it could lunge forward from a concealed position to snap at a stupid Edmontosaur it was fast enough.

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Re: T. rex: substantially slower than 32mph

#4  Postby crank » Aug 03, 2017 4:45 pm

How do the expected loads differ from a good lunge compared to running? I would think lunging would impose higher peak loads, running is usually a somewhat smooth operation when coordinated well enough. But then with running you'd have the accumulation of wear and microfracturing and etc and I don't really know what i'm talking about but these seem like they'd be important considerations. Maybe they jumped out of trees and squashed their prey, which also began the transition to flight/birds. Don't ask me how they got in the tree with those little arms, that's not my field.
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Re: T. rex: substantially slower than 32mph

#5  Postby theropod » Aug 04, 2017 1:20 pm

Considering the animation of the biomechanics employed in this study which exclude the tail and most of the body mass it becomes clear that only leg forces were considered.

The difference between a lunge and a run are vast. One or two steps isn't metabolically costly and while it does induce strain on skeletal elements there is no harmonic repeating stresses. Considering the bone pathologies present in Sue it seems T. rex was able to survive multiple fractures. If the bite of a Tyrannosaurus rex was as septic as I suspect the lunge to inflict a single bite Komodo Dragon style would be followed by slow trailing of the wounded victim. The oversized olfactory lobe of T. rex brain was used for something, and trailing a bleeding hadrosaur would be a simple task. If it was an ever sickening hadrosaur the task becomes easier as time passed.

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