Book Challenge 2018

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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#201  Postby UncertainSloth » Nov 11, 2018 12:11 pm

1. notes from the upside down: inside the world of stranger things - guy adams - 8/10
2. mythos - stephen fry - 9/10
3. how to stop time - matt haig - 9/10
4. fever dream - samanta schweblin - 8/10
5. tourmaline - james brogden - 9/10
6. the silent companions - laura purcell - 9/10
7. the surgeon of crowthorne - simon winchester - 8/10
8. the storm watcher - graham joyce - 8/10
9. the unseen - roy jacobsen - 8/10
10. the white city (down station 2) - simon morden - 8/10
11. the little stranger - sarah waters - 9/10
12. the pigeon - patrick suskind - 7/10
13. mr foreigner- matthew kneale - 8/10
14. arcadia - iain pears - 8/10
15. the children's home - charles lambert - 7/10
16. weird. dark. - luke smitherd - 8/10
17. the ghost hunters - neil spring - 9/10
18. the stone man - luke smitherd - and there it is, 10/10
19. reasons to stay alive - matt haig - 8/10
20. house of spines - michael j malone - 7/10
21. devil's day - andrew michael hurley - 10/10
22. limits of enchantment - graham joyce - 9/10
23. dream london - tony ballantyne - shite/10
24. rawblood - catriona ward - 9/10
25. underground railroad - colson whitehead - 9/10
26. the vanishing - sophia tobin - 7/10
27. reservoir 13 - jon macgregor - 8/10
28. norse mythology - neil gaiman - 9/10
29. under a watchful eye - adam nevill - 9/10
30. disappearance of adele bedeau - graeme mcrae burnet - 9/10
31. testament of vida tremayne - sarah vincent - 9/10
32. physics of the dead - luke smitherd - 9/10
33. the haunted book - jeremy dyson- 8/10
34. the daylight gate - jeanette winterson - 8/10
35. arrowood - laura mchugh - 9/10
36. the mysteries - lisa tuttle - 8/10
37. the terror - dan simmons spinal tap/10
38. The intuitionist - Colson whitehead 7/10
39. the hollow tree - james brogden - 8/10
40. a skinful of shadows - frances hardinge - 8/10
41. beastings - benjamin myers - 8/10
42. the coffin path - katherine clements - 8/10
43. the upstair room - kate murray-browne - 9/10
44. the last days of jack sparks - jason arnopp - 9/10
45. Marrow island - alexis sparks -8/10
46. Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Ellison - 10/10 - really liked this, right up my post-apocalyptic street...echoes of books like alas babylon, earth abides, old man and the wasteland, etc...

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"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” Tolkein
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#202  Postby UncertainSloth » Nov 11, 2018 12:19 pm

just amazoned her to see if she's written anything since and, lo and behold, it's become a trilogy.... :dance:
"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” Tolkein
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#203  Postby Fallible » Nov 11, 2018 3:55 pm

1. The Unseen - Roy Jacobsen.
2. Man's Search For Meaning - Viktor E. Frankl.
3. The Sellout - Paul Beatty.
4. How to Stop Time - Matt Haig.
5. 4 3 2 1- Paul Auster.
6. The Lost Village - Neil Spring.
7. The Dog Stars - Peter Heller.
8. Reasons to Stay Alive - Matt Haig.
9. The Vanishing - Sophia Tobin.
10. The Disappearance of Adele Bedeau - Graeme Macrae Burnet.
11. Sleeping Beauties - Stephen King & Owen King.
12. After Me Comes the Flood - Sarah Perry.
13. The Power - Naomi Alderman.
14. Beneath the Lake - Christopher Ransom.
15. The Testament of Vida Tremayne - Sarah Vincent.
16. The Sparsholt Affair - Alan Hollinghurst.
17. The Fifth Season - N.K. Jemisin.
18. The Obelisk Gate - N.K. Jemisin.
19. The Stone Sky - N.K. Jemisin.
20. The Outsider - Stephen King.
21. So You've Been Publicly Shamed - Jon Ronson. Kindle book.
22. Otherland: City of Golden Shadow - Tad Williams. Re-read.
22. Mister Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore - Robin Sloan.
23. The Abominable - Dan Simmons.
24. The Stone Man - Luke Smitherd.
25. Where the Dead Walk - John Bowen. Kindle book.
26. The Upstairs Room - Kate Murray-Browne.
27. The Night Ocean - Paul LaFarge.
28. The Dinner - Herman Koch.
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#204  Postby NamelessFaceless » Nov 13, 2018 2:15 pm

Audiobooks in Italics.

1. The Phantom of the Opera - Gaston Leroux
2. Ask the Dust - John Fante
3. Gerald's Game - Stephen King
4. Mad City: The True Story of the Campus Murders that America Forgot - Michael Arntfield
5. Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
6. Prison Noir - Short story collection by various authors edited by Joyce Carol Oates
7. As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner
8. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
9. Crown Heights - Colin Warner, Carl King, and Holly Lorincz
10. The Price of Inequality - Joseph E. Stiglitz
11. No Coming Back - Keith Houghton
12. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
13. In the Light of the Garden - Heather Burch
14. Hell's Princess: The Mystery of Belle Gunness, Butcher of Men - Harold Schechter
15. A Passage to India - E.M. Forster
16. Twist of Faith - Ellen J. Green
17. The Mysterious Island - Jules Verne
18. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (read by Elijah Wood)
19. The Girl With All the Gifts - M.R. Carey
20. The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders - Anthony Flacco (read by the author)
21. Dracula - Bram Stoker (read by Alan Cummings, Tim Curry, and more)
22. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
23. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll (read by Scarlett Johanssen)

24. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared - Jonas Jonassen
25. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad (read by Kenneth Branagh)
26. The Unseen World - Liz Moore
27. The Descendants - Kaui Hart Hemmings
28. The Trial - Franz Kafka
29. Zodiac - Robert Graysmith
30. The Buried Giant - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. How Parking Enforcement Stole My Soul - Ben Friedrich
32. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
33. The Coroner's Lunch - Colin Cotterill
34. The Prestige - Christopher Priest
35. The Blood Of Olympus - Rick Riordan
36. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
37. Stephen Hero - James Joyce
38. The Zookeeper's Wife - Diane Ackerman
39. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins (this is a "re-read" I guess. I listened to the audiobook a couple of months ago, but wanted to go back and read parts I felt I missed and ended up re-reading the whole book)
40. If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer - The Goldman Family
41. To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder - Nancy Rommelmann
42. Stormbreaker (Alex Rider Book 1) - Anthony Horowitz
43. The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England - Dan Jones
44. Death Comes for the Archbishop - Willa Cather
45. True - Karl Taro Greenfeld
46. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald
47. Alias Grace - Margaret Atwood
48. Last of the Mohicans - James Fennimore Cooper
49. Point Blank (Alex Rider Book 2) - Anthony Horowitz
50. Persuasion - Jane Austen
51. Jaws - Peter Benchley
52. Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
53. The Pied Piper (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
54. Panic (Blooddlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
55. Rampage (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#205  Postby crazyfitter » Nov 13, 2018 9:25 pm

1. The Associate - John Grisham. A nice re-read in my sickbed.
2. Galveston - Nic Pizzolatto
3. Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz
4. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
5. A Darkness More Than Night - Michael Connelly
6. Reconstruction - Mick Herron
7. Death in the Rainy Season - Anna Jaquirty
8. Down Cemetery Road - Mick Herron
9. The Courier - Ava McCarthy
10. Locked Rooms - Laurie R. King
11. The Venetian Game - Philip Gwynne Jones
12. Dodgers - Bill Beverly
13. Hack - Kieran Crowley
14. Stasi Child - David Young
15. The Player of Games - Iain M Banks. Reread
16. The Whisperers - John Connolly. Reread
17. A Legacy of Spies - John leCarre
18. Leviathan Wakes - James S.A. Corey
19. Before the Dawn - Jake Woodhouse
20. The Rooster Bar - John Grisham
21. The City & The City - China Mieville
22. The Tailor of Panama - John le Carre

I've just got my internet connection back after a break of about 5 weeks. My wife says she has been keeping an eye on me and doesn't think I've come to any harm, after all I've kept busy reading. Will pop out shortly and meet my new friends in the Flat Earth Society.

23. Revenge - Martina Cole
24. Phantoms - Dean R. koontz
25. The Tin Roof Blowdown - James Lee Burke
26. Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
27. The Billion Dollar Spy - David E. Hoffman
28. Contact - Carl Sagan
29. A Cold Day For Murder - Dana Stabenow
30. Purged - Peter Laws
31. Rather Be The Devil - Ian Rankin
32. Macbeth - Jo Nesbo
33. Why Does E=mc2 - Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw
34. Heaven’s Prisoners - James Lee Burke
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#206  Postby crazyfitter » Nov 21, 2018 8:47 pm

1. The Associate - John Grisham. A nice re-read in my sickbed.
2. Galveston - Nic Pizzolatto
3. Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz
4. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
5. A Darkness More Than Night - Michael Connelly
6. Reconstruction - Mick Herron
7. Death in the Rainy Season - Anna Jaquirty
8. Down Cemetery Road - Mick Herron
9. The Courier - Ava McCarthy
10. Locked Rooms - Laurie R. King
11. The Venetian Game - Philip Gwynne Jones
12. Dodgers - Bill Beverly
13. Hack - Kieran Crowley
14. Stasi Child - David Young
15. The Player of Games - Iain M Banks. Reread
16. The Whisperers - John Connolly. Reread
17. A Legacy of Spies - John leCarre
18. Leviathan Wakes - James S.A. Corey
19. Before the Dawn - Jake Woodhouse
20. The Rooster Bar - John Grisham
21. The City & The City - China Mieville
22. The Tailor of Panama - John le Carre

I've just got my internet connection back after a break of about 5 weeks. My wife says she has been keeping an eye on me and doesn't think I've come to any harm, after all I've kept busy reading. Will pop out shortly and meet my new friends in the Flat Earth Society.

23. Revenge - Martina Cole
24. Phantoms - Dean R. koontz
25. The Tin Roof Blowdown - James Lee Burke
26. Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
27. The Billion Dollar Spy - David E. Hoffman
28. Contact - Carl Sagan
29. A Cold Day For Murder - Dana Stabenow
30. Purged - Peter Laws
31. Rather Be The Devil - Ian Rankin
32. Macbeth - Jo Nesbo
33. Why Does E=mc2 - Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw
34. Heaven’s Prisoners - James Lee Burke
35. Hannibal Rising - Thomas Harris
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#207  Postby crazyfitter » Nov 21, 2018 9:05 pm

Image[

Thanks for this U.S.

I read the kindle free sample and was hooked, now halfway through the book
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#208  Postby crazyfitter » Nov 24, 2018 11:34 am

1. The Associate - John Grisham. A nice re-read in my sickbed.
2. Galveston - Nic Pizzolatto
3. Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz
4. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
5. A Darkness More Than Night - Michael Connelly
6. Reconstruction - Mick Herron
7. Death in the Rainy Season - Anna Jaquirty
8. Down Cemetery Road - Mick Herron
9. The Courier - Ava McCarthy
10. Locked Rooms - Laurie R. King
11. The Venetian Game - Philip Gwynne Jones
12. Dodgers - Bill Beverly
13. Hack - Kieran Crowley
14. Stasi Child - David Young
15. The Player of Games - Iain M Banks. Reread
16. The Whisperers - John Connolly. Reread
17. A Legacy of Spies - John leCarre
18. Leviathan Wakes - James S.A. Corey
19. Before the Dawn - Jake Woodhouse
20. The Rooster Bar - John Grisham
21. The City & The City - China Mieville
22. The Tailor of Panama - John le Carre

I've just got my internet connection back after a break of about 5 weeks. My wife says she has been keeping an eye on me and doesn't think I've come to any harm, after all I've kept busy reading. Will pop out shortly and meet my new friends in the Flat Earth Society.

23. Revenge - Martina Cole
24. Phantoms - Dean R. koontz
25. The Tin Roof Blowdown - James Lee Burke
26. Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
27. The Billion Dollar Spy - David E. Hoffman
28. Contact - Carl Sagan
29. A Cold Day For Murder - Dana Stabenow
30. Purged - Peter Laws
31. Rather Be The Devil - Ian Rankin
32. Macbeth - Jo Nesbo
33. Why Does E=mc2 - Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw
34. Heaven’s Prisoners - James Lee Burke
35. Hannibal Rising - Thomas Harris
36. The Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Elison
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#209  Postby NamelessFaceless » Nov 27, 2018 3:48 pm

Audiobooks in Italics.

1. The Phantom of the Opera - Gaston Leroux
2. Ask the Dust - John Fante
3. Gerald's Game - Stephen King
4. Mad City: The True Story of the Campus Murders that America Forgot - Michael Arntfield
5. Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
6. Prison Noir - Short story collection by various authors edited by Joyce Carol Oates
7. As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner
8. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
9. Crown Heights - Colin Warner, Carl King, and Holly Lorincz
10. The Price of Inequality - Joseph E. Stiglitz
11. No Coming Back - Keith Houghton
12. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
13. In the Light of the Garden - Heather Burch
14. Hell's Princess: The Mystery of Belle Gunness, Butcher of Men - Harold Schechter
15. A Passage to India - E.M. Forster
16. Twist of Faith - Ellen J. Green
17. The Mysterious Island - Jules Verne
18. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (read by Elijah Wood)
19. The Girl With All the Gifts - M.R. Carey
20. The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders - Anthony Flacco (read by the author)
21. Dracula - Bram Stoker (read by Alan Cummings, Tim Curry, and more)
22. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
23. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll (read by Scarlett Johanssen)

24. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared - Jonas Jonassen
25. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad (read by Kenneth Branagh)
26. The Unseen World - Liz Moore
27. The Descendants - Kaui Hart Hemmings
28. The Trial - Franz Kafka
29. Zodiac - Robert Graysmith
30. The Buried Giant - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. How Parking Enforcement Stole My Soul - Ben Friedrich
32. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
33. The Coroner's Lunch - Colin Cotterill
34. The Prestige - Christopher Priest
35. The Blood Of Olympus - Rick Riordan
36. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
37. Stephen Hero - James Joyce
38. The Zookeeper's Wife - Diane Ackerman
39. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins (this is a "re-read" I guess. I listened to the audiobook a couple of months ago, but wanted to go back and read parts I felt I missed and ended up re-reading the whole book)
40. If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer - The Goldman Family
41. To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder - Nancy Rommelmann
42. Stormbreaker (Alex Rider Book 1) - Anthony Horowitz
43. The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England - Dan Jones
44. Death Comes for the Archbishop - Willa Cather
45. True - Karl Taro Greenfeld
46. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald
47. Alias Grace - Margaret Atwood
48. Last of the Mohicans - James Fennimore Cooper
49. Point Blank (Alex Rider Book 2) - Anthony Horowitz
50. Persuasion - Jane Austen
51. Jaws - Peter Benchley
52. Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
53. The Pied Piper (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
54. Panic (Blooddlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
55. Rampage (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
56. The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby - Charles Dickens
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#210  Postby NamelessFaceless » Nov 30, 2018 2:16 pm

Audiobooks in Italics.

1. The Phantom of the Opera - Gaston Leroux
2. Ask the Dust - John Fante
3. Gerald's Game - Stephen King
4. Mad City: The True Story of the Campus Murders that America Forgot - Michael Arntfield
5. Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
6. Prison Noir - Short story collection by various authors edited by Joyce Carol Oates
7. As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner
8. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
9. Crown Heights - Colin Warner, Carl King, and Holly Lorincz
10. The Price of Inequality - Joseph E. Stiglitz
11. No Coming Back - Keith Houghton
12. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
13. In the Light of the Garden - Heather Burch
14. Hell's Princess: The Mystery of Belle Gunness, Butcher of Men - Harold Schechter
15. A Passage to India - E.M. Forster
16. Twist of Faith - Ellen J. Green
17. The Mysterious Island - Jules Verne
18. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (read by Elijah Wood)
19. The Girl With All the Gifts - M.R. Carey
20. The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders - Anthony Flacco (read by the author)
21. Dracula - Bram Stoker (read by Alan Cummings, Tim Curry, and more)
22. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
23. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll (read by Scarlett Johanssen)

24. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared - Jonas Jonassen
25. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad (read by Kenneth Branagh)
26. The Unseen World - Liz Moore
27. The Descendants - Kaui Hart Hemmings
28. The Trial - Franz Kafka
29. Zodiac - Robert Graysmith
30. The Buried Giant - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. How Parking Enforcement Stole My Soul - Ben Friedrich
32. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
33. The Coroner's Lunch - Colin Cotterill
34. The Prestige - Christopher Priest
35. The Blood Of Olympus - Rick Riordan
36. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
37. Stephen Hero - James Joyce
38. The Zookeeper's Wife - Diane Ackerman
39. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins (this is a "re-read" I guess. I listened to the audiobook a couple of months ago, but wanted to go back and read parts I felt I missed and ended up re-reading the whole book)
40. If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer - The Goldman Family
41. To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder - Nancy Rommelmann
42. Stormbreaker (Alex Rider Book 1) - Anthony Horowitz
43. The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England - Dan Jones
44. Death Comes for the Archbishop - Willa Cather
45. True - Karl Taro Greenfeld
46. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald
47. Alias Grace - Margaret Atwood
48. Last of the Mohicans - James Fennimore Cooper
49. Point Blank (Alex Rider Book 2) - Anthony Horowitz
50. Persuasion - Jane Austen
51. Jaws - Peter Benchley
52. Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
53. The Pied Piper (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
54. Panic (Blooddlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
55. Rampage (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
56. The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby - Charles Dickens
57. Slumdog Millionaire - Vikas Swarup
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#211  Postby UncertainSloth » Dec 01, 2018 11:57 am

crazyfitter wrote:Image[

Thanks for this U.S.

I read the kindle free sample and was hooked, now halfway through the book


ah, fab - only just seen this post...i really enjoyed it and there are two more in the series
"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” Tolkein
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#212  Postby UncertainSloth » Dec 01, 2018 12:01 pm

1. notes from the upside down: inside the world of stranger things - guy adams - 8/10
2. mythos - stephen fry - 9/10
3. how to stop time - matt haig - 9/10
4. fever dream - samanta schweblin - 8/10
5. tourmaline - james brogden - 9/10
6. the silent companions - laura purcell - 9/10
7. the surgeon of crowthorne - simon winchester - 8/10
8. the storm watcher - graham joyce - 8/10
9. the unseen - roy jacobsen - 8/10
10. the white city (down station 2) - simon morden - 8/10
11. the little stranger - sarah waters - 9/10
12. the pigeon - patrick suskind - 7/10
13. mr foreigner- matthew kneale - 8/10
14. arcadia - iain pears - 8/10
15. the children's home - charles lambert - 7/10
16. weird. dark. - luke smitherd - 8/10
17. the ghost hunters - neil spring - 9/10
18. the stone man - luke smitherd - and there it is, 10/10
19. reasons to stay alive - matt haig - 8/10
20. house of spines - michael j malone - 7/10
21. devil's day - andrew michael hurley - 10/10
22. limits of enchantment - graham joyce - 9/10
23. dream london - tony ballantyne - shite/10
24. rawblood - catriona ward - 9/10
25. underground railroad - colson whitehead - 9/10
26. the vanishing - sophia tobin - 7/10
27. reservoir 13 - jon macgregor - 8/10
28. norse mythology - neil gaiman - 9/10
29. under a watchful eye - adam nevill - 9/10
30. disappearance of adele bedeau - graeme mcrae burnet - 9/10
31. testament of vida tremayne - sarah vincent - 9/10
32. physics of the dead - luke smitherd - 9/10
33. the haunted book - jeremy dyson- 8/10
34. the daylight gate - jeanette winterson - 8/10
35. arrowood - laura mchugh - 9/10
36. the mysteries - lisa tuttle - 8/10
37. the terror - dan simmons spinal tap/10
38. The intuitionist - Colson whitehead 7/10
39. the hollow tree - james brogden - 8/10
40. a skinful of shadows - frances hardinge - 8/10
41. beastings - benjamin myers - 8/10
42. the coffin path - katherine clements - 8/10
43. the upstair room - kate murray-browne - 9/10
44. the last days of jack sparks - jason arnopp - 9/10
45. Marrow island - alexis sparks -8/10
46. Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Ellison - 10/10
47. the seven deaths of evelyn hardcastle - stuart turton - 10/10

jeez, i've read some cracking books this year - this is another one...one of the quotes on the back says 'agatha christie on time bending substances' and that's about right - a murder mystery meets the excellent spanish film timecrimes....apparently, it's 7 and a half deaths in the us

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"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” Tolkein
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#213  Postby NamelessFaceless » Dec 05, 2018 10:58 pm

Audiobooks in Italics.

1. The Phantom of the Opera - Gaston Leroux
2. Ask the Dust - John Fante
3. Gerald's Game - Stephen King
4. Mad City: The True Story of the Campus Murders that America Forgot - Michael Arntfield
5. Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
6. Prison Noir - Short story collection by various authors edited by Joyce Carol Oates
7. As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner
8. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
9. Crown Heights - Colin Warner, Carl King, and Holly Lorincz
10. The Price of Inequality - Joseph E. Stiglitz
11. No Coming Back - Keith Houghton
12. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
13. In the Light of the Garden - Heather Burch
14. Hell's Princess: The Mystery of Belle Gunness, Butcher of Men - Harold Schechter
15. A Passage to India - E.M. Forster
16. Twist of Faith - Ellen J. Green
17. The Mysterious Island - Jules Verne
18. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (read by Elijah Wood)
19. The Girl With All the Gifts - M.R. Carey
20. The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders - Anthony Flacco (read by the author)
21. Dracula - Bram Stoker (read by Alan Cummings, Tim Curry, and more)
22. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
23. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll (read by Scarlett Johanssen)

24. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared - Jonas Jonassen
25. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad (read by Kenneth Branagh)
26. The Unseen World - Liz Moore
27. The Descendants - Kaui Hart Hemmings
28. The Trial - Franz Kafka
29. Zodiac - Robert Graysmith
30. The Buried Giant - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. How Parking Enforcement Stole My Soul - Ben Friedrich
32. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
33. The Coroner's Lunch - Colin Cotterill
34. The Prestige - Christopher Priest
35. The Blood Of Olympus - Rick Riordan
36. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
37. Stephen Hero - James Joyce
38. The Zookeeper's Wife - Diane Ackerman
39. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins (this is a "re-read" I guess. I listened to the audiobook a couple of months ago, but wanted to go back and read parts I felt I missed and ended up re-reading the whole book)
40. If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer - The Goldman Family
41. To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder - Nancy Rommelmann
42. Stormbreaker (Alex Rider Book 1) - Anthony Horowitz
43. The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England - Dan Jones
44. Death Comes for the Archbishop - Willa Cather
45. True - Karl Taro Greenfeld
46. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald
47. Alias Grace - Margaret Atwood
48. Last of the Mohicans - James Fennimore Cooper
49. Point Blank (Alex Rider Book 2) - Anthony Horowitz
50. Persuasion - Jane Austen
51. Jaws - Peter Benchley
52. Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
53. The Pied Piper (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
54. Panic (Blooddlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
55. Rampage (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
56. The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby - Charles Dickens
57. Slumdog Millionaire - Vikas Swarup
58. Little Slaughterhouse on the Prairie - Harold Schechter
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#214  Postby crazyfitter » Dec 07, 2018 9:35 am

1. The Associate - John Grisham. A nice re-read in my sickbed.
2. Galveston - Nic Pizzolatto
3. Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz
4. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
5. A Darkness More Than Night - Michael Connelly
6. Reconstruction - Mick Herron
7. Death in the Rainy Season - Anna Jaquirty
8. Down Cemetery Road - Mick Herron
9. The Courier - Ava McCarthy
10. Locked Rooms - Laurie R. King
11. The Venetian Game - Philip Gwynne Jones
12. Dodgers - Bill Beverly
13. Hack - Kieran Crowley
14. Stasi Child - David Young
15. The Player of Games - Iain M Banks. Reread
16. The Whisperers - John Connolly. Reread
17. A Legacy of Spies - John leCarre
18. Leviathan Wakes - James S.A. Corey
19. Before the Dawn - Jake Woodhouse
20. The Rooster Bar - John Grisham
21. The City & The City - China Mieville
22. The Tailor of Panama - John le Carre

I've just got my internet connection back after a break of about 5 weeks. My wife says she has been keeping an eye on me and doesn't think I've come to any harm, after all I've kept busy reading. Will pop out shortly and meet my new friends in the Flat Earth Society.

23. Revenge - Martina Cole
24. Phantoms - Dean R. koontz
25. The Tin Roof Blowdown - James Lee Burke
26. Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
27. The Billion Dollar Spy - David E. Hoffman
28. Contact - Carl Sagan
29. A Cold Day For Murder - Dana Stabenow
30. Purged - Peter Laws
31. Rather Be The Devil - Ian Rankin
32. Macbeth - Jo Nesbo
33. Why Does E=mc2 - Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw
34. Heaven’s Prisoners - James Lee Burke
35. Hannibal Rising - Thomas Harris
36. The Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Elison
37. The Book of Etta - Meg Elison
38. Bite - Nick Louth
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#215  Postby NamelessFaceless » Dec 07, 2018 3:45 pm

Audiobooks in Italics.

1. The Phantom of the Opera - Gaston Leroux
2. Ask the Dust - John Fante
3. Gerald's Game - Stephen King
4. Mad City: The True Story of the Campus Murders that America Forgot - Michael Arntfield
5. Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
6. Prison Noir - Short story collection by various authors edited by Joyce Carol Oates
7. As I Lay Dying - William Faulkner
8. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
9. Crown Heights - Colin Warner, Carl King, and Holly Lorincz
10. The Price of Inequality - Joseph E. Stiglitz
11. No Coming Back - Keith Houghton
12. Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
13. In the Light of the Garden - Heather Burch
14. Hell's Princess: The Mystery of Belle Gunness, Butcher of Men - Harold Schechter
15. A Passage to India - E.M. Forster
16. Twist of Faith - Ellen J. Green
17. The Mysterious Island - Jules Verne
18. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (read by Elijah Wood)
19. The Girl With All the Gifts - M.R. Carey
20. The Road Out of Hell: Sanford Clark and the True Story of the Wineville Murders - Anthony Flacco (read by the author)
21. Dracula - Bram Stoker (read by Alan Cummings, Tim Curry, and more)
22. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
23. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll (read by Scarlett Johanssen)

24. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared - Jonas Jonassen
25. Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad (read by Kenneth Branagh)
26. The Unseen World - Liz Moore
27. The Descendants - Kaui Hart Hemmings
28. The Trial - Franz Kafka
29. Zodiac - Robert Graysmith
30. The Buried Giant - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. How Parking Enforcement Stole My Soul - Ben Friedrich
32. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
33. The Coroner's Lunch - Colin Cotterill
34. The Prestige - Christopher Priest
35. The Blood Of Olympus - Rick Riordan
36. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
37. Stephen Hero - James Joyce
38. The Zookeeper's Wife - Diane Ackerman
39. The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins (this is a "re-read" I guess. I listened to the audiobook a couple of months ago, but wanted to go back and read parts I felt I missed and ended up re-reading the whole book)
40. If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer - The Goldman Family
41. To the Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder - Nancy Rommelmann
42. Stormbreaker (Alex Rider Book 1) - Anthony Horowitz
43. The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England - Dan Jones
44. Death Comes for the Archbishop - Willa Cather
45. True - Karl Taro Greenfeld
46. H is for Hawk - Helen Macdonald
47. Alias Grace - Margaret Atwood
48. Last of the Mohicans - James Fennimore Cooper
49. Point Blank (Alex Rider Book 2) - Anthony Horowitz
50. Persuasion - Jane Austen
51. Jaws - Peter Benchley
52. Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
53. The Pied Piper (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
54. Panic (Blooddlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
55. Rampage (Bloodlands Collection) - Harold Schechter
56. The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby - Charles Dickens
57. Slumdog Millionaire - Vikas Swarup
58. Little Slaughterhouse on the Prairie - Harold Schechter
59. The Pirate - Harold Schecter
60. The Brick Slayer - Harold Schechter
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#216  Postby UncertainSloth » Dec 15, 2018 8:32 am

1. notes from the upside down: inside the world of stranger things - guy adams - 8/10
2. mythos - stephen fry - 9/10
3. how to stop time - matt haig - 9/10
4. fever dream - samanta schweblin - 8/10
5. tourmaline - james brogden - 9/10
6. the silent companions - laura purcell - 9/10
7. the surgeon of crowthorne - simon winchester - 8/10
8. the storm watcher - graham joyce - 8/10
9. the unseen - roy jacobsen - 8/10
10. the white city (down station 2) - simon morden - 8/10
11. the little stranger - sarah waters - 9/10
12. the pigeon - patrick suskind - 7/10
13. mr foreigner- matthew kneale - 8/10
14. arcadia - iain pears - 8/10
15. the children's home - charles lambert - 7/10
16. weird. dark. - luke smitherd - 8/10
17. the ghost hunters - neil spring - 9/10
18. the stone man - luke smitherd - and there it is, 10/10
19. reasons to stay alive - matt haig - 8/10
20. house of spines - michael j malone - 7/10
21. devil's day - andrew michael hurley - 10/10
22. limits of enchantment - graham joyce - 9/10
23. dream london - tony ballantyne - shite/10
24. rawblood - catriona ward - 9/10
25. underground railroad - colson whitehead - 9/10
26. the vanishing - sophia tobin - 7/10
27. reservoir 13 - jon macgregor - 8/10
28. norse mythology - neil gaiman - 9/10
29. under a watchful eye - adam nevill - 9/10
30. disappearance of adele bedeau - graeme mcrae burnet - 9/10
31. testament of vida tremayne - sarah vincent - 9/10
32. physics of the dead - luke smitherd - 9/10
33. the haunted book - jeremy dyson- 8/10
34. the daylight gate - jeanette winterson - 8/10
35. arrowood - laura mchugh - 9/10
36. the mysteries - lisa tuttle - 8/10
37. the terror - dan simmons spinal tap/10
38. The intuitionist - Colson whitehead 7/10
39. the hollow tree - james brogden - 8/10
40. a skinful of shadows - frances hardinge - 8/10
41. beastings - benjamin myers - 8/10
42. the coffin path - katherine clements - 8/10
43. the upstair room - kate murray-browne - 9/10
44. the last days of jack sparks - jason arnopp - 9/10
45. Marrow island - alexis sparks -8/10
46. Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Ellison - 10/10
47. the seven deaths of evelyn hardcastle - stuart turton - 10/10
48. the last of us - rob ewing - 8/10- another good read, but possibly the most depressing book i've read this year...group of children left on a remote scottish island after an apocalyptic event...

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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#217  Postby Fallible » Dec 16, 2018 9:07 pm

1. The Unseen - Roy Jacobsen.
2. Man's Search For Meaning - Viktor E. Frankl.
3. The Sellout - Paul Beatty.
4. How to Stop Time - Matt Haig.
5. 4 3 2 1- Paul Auster.
6. The Lost Village - Neil Spring.
7. The Dog Stars - Peter Heller.
8. Reasons to Stay Alive - Matt Haig.
9. The Vanishing - Sophia Tobin.
10. The Disappearance of Adele Bedeau - Graeme Macrae Burnet.
11. Sleeping Beauties - Stephen King & Owen King.
12. After Me Comes the Flood - Sarah Perry.
13. The Power - Naomi Alderman.
14. Beneath the Lake - Christopher Ransom.
15. The Testament of Vida Tremayne - Sarah Vincent.
16. The Sparsholt Affair - Alan Hollinghurst.
17. The Fifth Season - N.K. Jemisin.
18. The Obelisk Gate - N.K. Jemisin.
19. The Stone Sky - N.K. Jemisin.
20. The Outsider - Stephen King.
21. So You've Been Publicly Shamed - Jon Ronson. Kindle book.
22. Otherland: City of Golden Shadow - Tad Williams. Re-read.
22. Mister Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore - Robin Sloan.
23. The Abominable - Dan Simmons.
24. The Stone Man - Luke Smitherd.
25. Where the Dead Walk - John Bowen. Kindle book.
26. The Upstairs Room - Kate Murray-Browne.
27. The Night Ocean - Paul LaFarge.
28. The Dinner - Herman Koch.
29. I Am Behind You - John Ajvide Lindqvist.
30. The Sudden Departure of the Frasers - Louise Candlish. Absolute shit.
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#218  Postby crazyfitter » Dec 19, 2018 10:29 pm

1. The Associate - John Grisham. A nice re-read in my sickbed.
2. Galveston - Nic Pizzolatto
3. Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz
4. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
5. A Darkness More Than Night - Michael Connelly
6. Reconstruction - Mick Herron
7. Death in the Rainy Season - Anna Jaquirty
8. Down Cemetery Road - Mick Herron
9. The Courier - Ava McCarthy
10. Locked Rooms - Laurie R. King
11. The Venetian Game - Philip Gwynne Jones
12. Dodgers - Bill Beverly
13. Hack - Kieran Crowley
14. Stasi Child - David Young
15. The Player of Games - Iain M Banks. Reread
16. The Whisperers - John Connolly. Reread
17. A Legacy of Spies - John leCarre
18. Leviathan Wakes - James S.A. Corey
19. Before the Dawn - Jake Woodhouse
20. The Rooster Bar - John Grisham
21. The City & The City - China Mieville
22. The Tailor of Panama - John le Carre

I've just got my internet connection back after a break of about 5 weeks. My wife says she has been keeping an eye on me and doesn't think I've come to any harm, after all I've kept busy reading. Will pop out shortly and meet my new friends in the Flat Earth Society.

23. Revenge - Martina Cole
24. Phantoms - Dean R. koontz
25. The Tin Roof Blowdown - James Lee Burke
26. Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
27. The Billion Dollar Spy - David E. Hoffman
28. Contact - Carl Sagan
29. A Cold Day For Murder - Dana Stabenow
30. Purged - Peter Laws
31. Rather Be The Devil - Ian Rankin
32. Macbeth - Jo Nesbo
33. Why Does E=mc2 - Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw
34. Heaven’s Prisoners - James Lee Burke
35. Hannibal Rising - Thomas Harris
36. The Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Elison
37. The Book of Etta - Meg Elison
38. Bite - Nick Louth
39. The Ritual - Adam Nevill
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#219  Postby don't get me started » Dec 26, 2018 1:49 am

I've been focusing on some pretty intensive research projects this year and have a couple of book chapters in review now as well as a few journal articles that are in the editing phase, so it's been a busy year. I've had to be strict with my time, hence I've not been posting my book challenge lists here, but keeping it updated elsewhere.
I've written a short passage on most books but I won't tax your patience here and include them all, just a few tasters



1. Regarding the Pain of Others – Susan Sontag
2. Vulgar Tongues: An Alternative History of English Slang – Mac Décharné
3. Why? Explaining the Holocaust – Peter Hayes
4. In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and its Ironies – David Rieff
5. Linguistic Relativity: Evidence across Languages and Cognitive Domains – Caleb Everett
6. The Linguistics Delusion – Geoffrey Sampson

No. 6 was a pretty full on polemic against the current state of academic linguistics as represented primarily by Chomskian generative grammar. I am in fundamental agreement with the author’s central argument that language is a human artifact and not open to investigation using the rigorous scientific standards of the hard sciences. The search for universals has yielded no real insights beyond the most banal and self-evident.
The author does not refer much to the kinds of research undertaken by those working in the Conversation Analysis or Corpus Studies. These are fields that unlike the self-referential, intuition-based tail chasing of much so-called formal linguistics rely on the collection and analysis of actual data. Language and language use is interesting enough without having to clothe itself in the ill-fitting clothes of scientism. It is a social science, not physics or cosmology.

7. On the Map: Why the World Looks the Way it Does – Simon Garfield

No. 7 was a fascinating history of cartography and the ways in which
people have tried to describe their environment. It is hard to imagine what it must have been like in earlier times when the world seemed impossibly large and knowledge was mixed with myth and fanciful traveler’s tales. The author communicates his enthusiasm for the subject in lively and amusing prose. The stories of the history of the Mercator projection and the London tube map were well done. I particularly liked the section detailing the sex differences that seem to exist in map reading and direction finding. Males often seem (according to the research) to create mental maps whereas women seem to go for the landmark-to-landmark method of wayfinding. The form of maps in Japan is often bewildering for me and seems to go for the landmark-to-landmark method, especially in urban settings. I’d like to read more about visual representation of landscapes in cultural terms, and find out if there are preferences for certain types of representation in various cultures.

8. Stand by Your Manhood – Peter Lloyd
9. The Debatable Land: The Lost World Between Scotland and England – Graham Robb A very readable and interesting history of a place that I am intimately familiar with. The bloody centuries of strife between the Kingdoms of England and Scotland were primarily played out here and the people of the borders developed their own ways of coping with the bloodshed and anarchy. The gallows humor of the typical borderer and general disdain for the distant power centers, both north and south is well captured. As the old ITV region of Border showed, there is a zone between Scotland and England that is not quite one nor the other and the people who live there pay scant attention to the line when it suits them.
10. Numbers and the making of us – Caleb Everett
11. How England Made the English - Harry Mount
12. The Fear and the Freedom: How the Second World War Changed Us – Keith Lowe One of the best books I have read in years. Lowe investigates the long-term consequences of a period of organized cruelty, violence and bloodletting. The scale ranges from the intimate, personal and psychological to the global and abstract. The author is not shy about exposing the myths that peoples, societies and nations have created for themselves about the war, but rather than castigating the tellers of these myths for mendacity, deceit and denial, he explores the natural and understandable processes by which people come to create and maintain these myths and self-serving biases as a response to the trauma they experienced, whether it be personally or vicariously. Facing up to hard truths and the morally grey areas of human existence and experience is a hard task indeed for people and societies alike, but a vital one, nonetheless.
13. How Language Began: the Story of Humanity’s Greatest Invention – Daniel Everett
14. Cognitive Grammar – John R. Taylor
15. Number Words and Number Symbols: A Cultural History of Numbers – Karl Menninger
A fascinating book drawing on vast scholarship and keen insights into counting, numbers, number words, number systems and the history of calculating. Number words in various languages reveal all kinds of things about history, linguistics and human psychology. What is interesting from this is the extreme variation in the ways that different languages have gone about conceptualizing numbers and counting, which is counter-intuitive on the surface, given that we think of numbers and the language of math’s as being a ‘universal’ language that transcends culture and tradition. Far from it! The variety of systems that exist f supports the notion that counting and numbers are not an innate human mental attribute, but a cultural invention that is subject to extreme variation and can reveal real deficiencies in our way of organizing systematic thought about the world around us.
16. 1946: The Making of the Modern World – Victor Sebestyen A comprehensive description of the way the world was in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Poignant and not afraid to point fingers at the power brokers leaders who seized on the chaos and re-ordered social order to implement their own agendas, even if it meant further bloodshed and destruction. The mendacity of Stalin and his murderous regime is given full treatment, along with the hypocrisy of the Western imperialists who talked about liberation whilst trying (vainly) to hold onto their imperial possessions. The nightmare of partition is given similar nuanced treatment. The ineptitude, folly and hypocrisy of the British is set alongside the chauvinistic religious extremism of parts of both the Hindu and Muslim sectors of Indian society.
A sobering read, containing uncomfortable truths, whatever your political leanings, nationality or religious affiliation. No one gets off lightly, which just goes to show that the war continued for a long time after VE and VJ days.

17. Are Some Languages Better Than Others? – R.M.W. Dixon
18. Swearing is good for you Emma Byrne As a lifelong devotee of the art of profanity, vulgarity and verbal filth, I took great delight in this book. There appears to be a large research base out there dealing with the what, when, where, why and how of swearing. It appears that letting rip has all kinds of social, psychological and even physical benefits. It creates and maintains social bonds, reduces stress, mitigates physical pain and social exclusion and is far more widespread among both men and women than is generally recognized. Despite the widespread, frequent and laissez faire attitude to swearing that prevails in many countries and societies, it seems that in some quarters, particularly in the US, but also elsewhere, there are still those who strongly oppose any kind of strong language and think that swearing betokens low intelligence, low moral character, a poor vocabulary, a deficient education and so on. The status of swearing as a linguistic universal surely puts this pejorative attitude on the list of abnormal psychological states.
19. How We Talk: The Inner Workings of Conversation – N. J. Enfield This was an excellent overview of the current state of thinking on the social aspect and roots and workings of language. Rather than the Chomsky dogma of syntactic structures and LAD, recursion and so on, Enfield makes a case for the grounding of language not in some specialized morphological node of the brain, but in our innate hyper sociability. The universals of turn transition, repair and sense making are rooted in our need to connect with others and work in concert with them. Animals don’t communicate like humans because they are not as social as us. A great book that I will be using with students.
20. Arnhem: The Battle for Survival – John Nichol & Tony Rennell
21. The Pragmatics of Interaction – Sigurd D’hondt, Jan-Ola Östman & Jef Verschuren (Eds)
22. Number: The language of Science –Tobias Dantzig Although first published in 1930, this book is still regarded as a classic. Not being a particularly numerate type myself, I have to admit that a lot of the mathematical stuff was simply beyond my understanding. I can understand the principles of irrational numbers, infinity and orders of infinity, geometry and so on, but the details bewilder me. That said, this is so much more than a book of maths. It is also a book of history, philosophy, psychology and anthropology.
There were a few quotes that I really loved and I will set them down here, for my own purposes.

We learned these at an age when we were interested in the ‘how’ of things. By the time we were old enough to ask ‘why’, these rules, through constant use, had become such an intimate part of our mental equipment that they were taken for granted. (p.62)

When, after a thousand-year stupor, European thought shook of the effect of the sleeping powders so skillfully administered by the Christian fathers, the problem of infinity was one of the first to be revived. (p.134)

This definitely disposed of the problem of squaring the circle, without, of course dampening in the least the ardor of the circle-squarers. For it is characteristic of these people that their ignorance equals their capacity for self-deception. (p.121)

23. Is English Changing? – Steve Kleinedler
24. The Kingdom of Speech – Tom Wolfe Breezy writing with a distinctly iconoclastic tone, Wolfe cuts to the heart of the matter from the outset. The natural selection outlook on the speciation of the natural world holds sway in much of the educated world at the present time. But, even from its first articulation, the issue of human language has posed a problem. How could such a remarkable thing as human language have arisen? Wolfe Charts the various attempts to account for human language, starting with Darwin and his contemporaries and going through a ‘dark age’ where the question was more or less out of bounds. The next phase was the ‘scientification’ of linguistics headed up by Chomsky and his followers. Wolfe details the utter failure of this program to come up with any substantial results, culminating with a 2014 article by eight leading linguists admitting failure and simply declaring that language was an enigma. All the while, mind you, discounting the proposal made by Daniel Everett that language was not evolved at all, but is a cultural artifact, an invention like the wheel and the bow and arrow. Our minds didn’t evolve to make language any more than our hands evolved to use keyboards. Both are happy results of existing facts of human existence that were laid down long before there were words or word processors. Great read.
25. The Semantics of Nouns – Ye Zhengdao
26. Why is English Like That? Historical Answers to Hard ELT Questions – Norbert Schmitt and Richard Marsden.
27. Words in the Mind: How Words Capture Human Experience – Barbara Malt and Phillip Wolff (Eds.) A broad look at the question of linguistic relativity. The range of chapters is quite wide, dealing with colour terms, body parts, causality and others. The papers range in tone from dense academic prose to a more lightweight style. The languages dealt with are the main ‘big’ languages such as English, Chines, German, Japanese and Korean, to some of the ‘exotic’ languages that will be familiar to all students of linguistic relativity: Paraha, Dyirbal, Yucatec, Arrernte and so on. One issue that I’d like to see fleshed out is a multi-modal comparison between two languages. The verb framed vs path framed contrast between Spanish and English is a well-researched field. I’d like to see a broad-spectrum description of things like, space, time, number, counting, causality and so on with reference to just two languages all the way through, to see how they relate in total. All in all a good, varied, occasionally challenging read.
28. The Local: A History of the English Pub. – Paul Jennings. This was a thoroughly researched history of the pub in England from about the 17th Century to the modern period. The narrative clearly lays out the changing fortunes and definitions of the ‘pub’ across the centuries. From the alehouses and beer shops to the gin palaces and modern gastro-pubs it is clear that the pub has been a central part of English social life for hundred s of years, but the precise definition of what the quintessential pub is remains elusive. That being said, when you are in a good pub, you know it, and when you travel abroad and enter something styling itself as a ‘British Pub’ but doesn’t quite get it right, you also know it. The efforts of all kinds of temperance reformers, moralists, busybodys, zealous magistrates and interfering politicians over the centuries have never really dented the desire of people in England (and the UK at large) to socialize while consuming alcohol.
29. The Fallout: How a Guilty Liberal Lost his Innocence – Andrew Anthony.
30. Prisoners of the Sun – Hergé A classic Tintin adventure featuring stunning landscapes, strange mysteries, plotting villains and a real ‘feel’ for place and character. I had to look it up but this was originally written/drawn in the mid to late 40’s. The political outlook is nuanced and humanistic and the natives of Peru are portrayed with sympathy and respect, without any virtue signaling or post-colonial baggage. Can’t believe I read this when I was a child and have come back to it all these years later. I’ll be revisiting other Tintin adventures shortly I feel sure!
31. The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life – Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson.
32. Grammar in Everyday Talk: Building Responsive Actions – Sandra A. Thompson, Barbara A. Fox and Elizabeth Couper-Kulen.
33. Flashman and the Dragon – George MacDonald Fraser. Vintage Flashman and well worth the re-read. The un-PC language and sentiments of the dastardly, cowardly, craven, lustful and deeply selfish Flashman will no doubt put the books beyond the pale for many modern readers, but careful reading will reveal a subtle and nuanced view on the ages of Victorian imperialism and a vivid and eye-opening description of a civilization ‘as old as the flood’ and in its own way as arrogant, racist and despicable as those who came to conquer it. But, on top of the cultural insights, politicking and historical descriptions, what holds the whole thing together is the humor of the writing: ironic, sardonic, given to preposterous overexaggerations, wry similes and scandalous character assassinations. The unwritten volumes of the Flashman saga are a great loss to the reading public, but fortunately, such is the quality of the writing, re-reads are always a rewarding endeavor.
34. English as a Second F*cking Language – Sterling Johnson.
35. Things Can Only get Worse: Twenty Confusing years in the Life of a Labour Supporter – John O’Farrell. I’ve read some of O’Farrell’s history books and really enjoyed his writing style. This book was just as engaging and the author delivers his story with a canny ear for the cadences of spoken language, and an eagle eye for the bizarre and eccentric which he delivers with dry with and telling turns of phrase. I particularly enjoyed his description of being met at the door while canvasing for his beloved Labour party by a mid-morning tippler who he said appeared to have mastered the art of sleeping rough indoors. The author is not shy about detailing his doubts and uncertainties and is open about the burdens that come from having a progressive political outlook. His discomfort at hearing an African-American detailing the systematic homophobia that exists in many African American communities brings him to conclude that liberals just can’t handle hearing prejudice and discrimination from those who they feel have been the victims of systematic persecution themselves. ‘We’re just not programmed to cope with it.` All in all a good read and a keen insight into the progressive mind as it tries to deal with the messiness of the world: unlike the non-progressive mind that is certain of all things.
36. Mouse or Rat – Umberto Eco.
37. Don’t Sleep, There are Snakes- Daniel Everett

38. The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting up a Generation for Failure – Greg Lukianoff & Jonathon Haidt. A timely and well argued thesis about how we are going about the business of promoting a rationalistic society that values free speech, critical thinking and tolerance- or not. A lot of the ideas here are already out there, but seeing them organized into a general thesis about the state of modern society, (what is it like, where is it failing and how did we get here?) was refreshing. The notions of safetyism, overprotection, the conflation of intellectual or emotional discomfort with violence, binary and tribalistic thinking, call-out culture and the dangers of social media both to the body politic and to the individual mind are well described. As one of the counters to this malaise I particularly like the concept for anti-fragile which is the idea that if a mind/body/intellect/social system is not subject to some amount of stress and pressure it will atrophy. It is good to meet with adversity…physical, emotional, societal, intellectual and so on.
I’m glad I have always been wary of social media and have always either rejected it outright or kept it at arms distance. It is no substitute of actual social interaction, and I will be striving to pass this outlook on to my kids.


39. Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning – Timothy Snyder
40. The Alien World: The Complete Illustrated Guide – Steven Eisler
41. The Semantics of English Prepositions – Andrea Tyler and Vyvian Evans. A very technical book, written in a dense academic style. The authors take on the task of teasing out the meanings of spatial prepositions in English. While paying due respect to the metaphor theories of Lakoff and Johnson, they propose that the prepositions have at their origin in idealized ‘principled polysemy’ model that posits a kind of spatial schema which lies at the root of each prepositional concept and that speakers draw on these models to extend the meanings to other, often non-special meanings and usages. A lot to digest here, but I enjoyed the explication of over and am inclined towards the ‘influence realm/ non-influence realm distinction posited for above and over, versus under and below. I had a ‘Oh, yeah, that’s right’ in the mention that ‘out’ is only rarely used a pure preposition (the cat is out the bag….) and almost always appears with ‘of’ or as part of a phrasal verb construction. What is in is in, but what is out, the nature or being out is a much more varied and fuzzy conceptual category it seems.
42. The Handbook of Conversation Analysis – Jack Sidnell and Tanya Stivers (Eds.)
43. Number – Greville G. Corbett The breadth of scholarship on display here is astonishing. Examples to illustrate the points made are drawn from hundreds of different languages, from major languages such as English, Arabic and Russian to small languages from technologically undeveloped tribal languages. It seems that the Single plural distinction we are used to in English is just one way fo representing number in language. Other languages have single, dual, trial, paucal and plural (p.25). The author also argues convincingly for an animacy hierarchy, that goes: speaker, addressee, 3rd person, kin, human, animate, inanimate. (p.57) This manifests itself in marking for number on these categories. If a language marks a category, then it will automatically mark all categories above it, but not necessarily all categories below it. There is also an interesting section on plurality in verbs. Some verbs like massacre (as opposed to kill) and mandate plural objects and some intransitive verbs, like scatter, mandate plural subjects. Other languages have ways for marking multiple subjects, objects or, and this is interesting, multiple occurrences of the action.
There is a lot to digest here and this book will have to be referenced and re-read again in the future.

44. You are Now Less Dumb: How to Conquer Mob Mentality, How to Buy Happiness And All The Other Ways to Outsmart Yourself-David McCareny.
45. Direct and Indirect Speech - F. Coulmas (Ed.)
46. Discourse markers: Descriptions and Theory - Andreas Jucker and Yael Ziv (Eds.)
47. Semantics for Counting and Measuring – Susan Rothstein
48. It’s a Wonderful Word: The Real Origin of Our Favorite Words From Anorak to Zombie – Albert Jack
49. Long Road from Jarrow – Stuart Maconie A thoughtful, impassioned and deeply moving account of the author’s retracing of the route of the famous Jarrow Crusade of October 1936 when 200 men from the town marched to London to present a petition requesting investment in jobs in their town. From the hard bitten towns of the post-industrial north and Midlands to the prosperous home counties, Maconie observes the state of the nation in 2016. The themes of Brexit and the election of Trump figure large, and the author is not shy about airing his leftist sentiments. His ire towards Trump is plain, but he is more nuanced than most about Brexit, seeing the pro-leave’s strong showing as a testament to the sense of rage and abandonment felt by many outside the comfortable and prosperous south east heartlands. Maconie makes some cutting and insightful comments on the conservative world view. Describing his own escape from the low cultural expectations that were the lot of the working class of yore, he credits his appreciation for the products of high culture with the accessibility that was provided by state funding. That state is pejoratively labelled as the ‘nanny state’ by many. Maconie comments acidy that this slur is usually issued by those who actually had nannies. He also comments on a young woman who was told by some Tory MP during a visit to Parliament that ‘university wasn’t for everyone’ or words to that effect. Maconie’s disgust is clear as he muses in the brass neck of those who have had the best education money can buy lecturing working class people from disadvantaged areas of the nation on not daring to aspire for a tertiary education. The author also muses on ‘post-truth’ (p.236) and discerns that it doesn’t so much mean ‘after’ as it ‘implies and atmosphere in which the notion is irrelevant.’
On page 335 Maconie gives vent to his frustration and ire over the anti-progressive world view that infects the body politic: ‘Of all the queasy,weaselly, mealy-mouthed lickspittle dismissials in modern English, nothing compares to that phrase the ‘politics of envy. Effectively it reduces people’s desire for proper schools, houses, jobs and healthcare to no more than a jealousy for some nice brogues they once saw in GQ.’ Well said!
A very worthwhile read and I shall be reading some of the other books by the same author.

50. Purity and Danger – Mary Douglas
51. Pies and Prejudice: In Search of the North – Stuart Maconie Funny, opinionated, insightful and funny. Stuart Maconie tours the North of England ladling out acerbic one liners, caustic judgments, wry praise and fulsome acclaim in equal measure. Given his background in music journalism, it was perhaps inevitable that he would discourse at length on the pop music traditions of Liverpool, Manchester (Madchester!) and all the rest of it. Not my most central aspect of northern identity, but then again, I’m a bit odd in regards music. His take on the Yorkshire/Lancashire feud is just the right balance of partisanship, justification, humor and secret admiration of the terrible foe on the other side of the Penines. Although he gives the industrial heartlands of the North a good write up and spends some time discoursing on the ‘posh’ north of Cheshire and Harrogate, and thence on to the joys of Geordieland and the North east in general, but the treatment of Cumbria was a bit scant: the county town and historical heart of the borderlands was omitted entirely. Apart from that, a lively, well-paced book that charts a nice line between ‘it’s grim up north’ and ‘hearts of gold’ stereotypes, often with tongue firmly in cheek. A great read.

52. British as a Second Language
– David Bennun. The blurb on the cover warns you that this book is laugh-out-loud funny. And indeed, it is. The author has a keen eye and an insight as a ‘returnee’ that allows him to see things that native Brits might miss. Bennun is perhaps more British than he likes to admit as he immerses himself in that strange land. It is not a tale of polite county types and kindly old dears on the bus, of stout yeomen and quaintly eccentric old maids. No, this is a nation of drinking, fighting, swearing. Of fractious lunatic girlfriends, brain-addled substance abusers, chronically inept employees, and faddy counter-culture types all living in dilapidated buildings and eating vile muck out of habit and to soak up the booze. The author gives short shrift to the virtue signaling lefties and cause-for-a-day activists and also the drawling home counties types, Diana mourners, casual and not-so casual racists and bigots that he has encountered over the years. But, still, despite all of this, he seems, somehow to have conceived a fondness for the place. Excellent read.
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Re: Book Challenge 2018

#220  Postby crazyfitter » Dec 27, 2018 1:06 pm

1. The Associate - John Grisham. A nice re-read in my sickbed.
2. Galveston - Nic Pizzolatto
3. Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz
4. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
5. A Darkness More Than Night - Michael Connelly
6. Reconstruction - Mick Herron
7. Death in the Rainy Season - Anna Jaquirty
8. Down Cemetery Road - Mick Herron
9. The Courier - Ava McCarthy
10. Locked Rooms - Laurie R. King
11. The Venetian Game - Philip Gwynne Jones
12. Dodgers - Bill Beverly
13. Hack - Kieran Crowley
14. Stasi Child - David Young
15. The Player of Games - Iain M Banks. Reread
16. The Whisperers - John Connolly. Reread
17. A Legacy of Spies - John leCarre
18. Leviathan Wakes - James S.A. Corey
19. Before the Dawn - Jake Woodhouse
20. The Rooster Bar - John Grisham
21. The City & The City - China Mieville
22. The Tailor of Panama - John le Carre

I've just got my internet connection back after a break of about 5 weeks. My wife says she has been keeping an eye on me and doesn't think I've come to any harm, after all I've kept busy reading. Will pop out shortly and meet my new friends in the Flat Earth Society.

23. Revenge - Martina Cole
24. Phantoms - Dean R. koontz
25. The Tin Roof Blowdown - James Lee Burke
26. Dead Souls - Ian Rankin
27. The Billion Dollar Spy - David E. Hoffman
28. Contact - Carl Sagan
29. A Cold Day For Murder - Dana Stabenow
30. Purged - Peter Laws
31. Rather Be The Devil - Ian Rankin
32. Macbeth - Jo Nesbo
33. Why Does E=mc2 - Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw
34. Heaven’s Prisoners - James Lee Burke
35. Hannibal Rising - Thomas Harris
36. The Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Elison
37. The Book of Etta - Meg Elison
38. Bite - Nick Louth
39. The Ritual - Adam Nevill
40. The Katharina Code - Jorn Lier Horst
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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