Book Challenge Thread 2019

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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#361  Postby crazyfitter » Dec 20, 2019 8:26 pm

1. Long Road From Jarrow - Stuart Maconie
2. Death Without Company - Craig Johnson
3. The Shortest History of Germany - James Hawes
4. The Last Coyote - Michael Connelly
5. Kindness Goes Unpunished - Craig Johnson
6. Lethal White - Robert Galbraith
7. The Girl in the Woods - Camilla Lackberg
8. Making Sense: The Glamorous Story of English Grammar – David Crystal
9. Another Man's Moccasins - Craig Johnson
10. Austerity. The Demolition of the Welfare State and the rise of the Zombie Economy - Kerry-Anne Mendoza
11. Space Opera - Catherynne M. Valente. I’ve abandoned this book at 90%. Please don’t waste your life with it.
12. The Steerswoman - Rosemary Kirsten
13. The Outskirters Secret - Rosemary Kirsten
14. The Lost Steersman - Rosemary Kirsten
15. The Language of Power - Rosemary Kirsten. Looking forward to the next 2 when published.
16. Personal - Lee Child
17. And The Weak Suffer What They Must? - Yanis Varoufakis
18. The Birdcage - Clive Aslet
19. Semiosis - Sue Burke
20. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
21. Light - M. John Harrison
22. Past Tense - Lee Child
23. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
24. London Rules - Mick Herron
25. The Death And Life Of Bobby Z - Don Winslow
26. The Good Detective - John McMahon
27. Transcription - Kate Atkinson
28. Permafrost - Alastair Reynolds
29. The Thieves of Manhattan - Adam Langer
30. The Clockmakers Daughter - Kate Morton
31. Underland - Robert Macfarlane
32. Let Go My Hand - Edward Docx
33. A Question of Blood - Ian Rankin
34. Rama II - Arthur C Clarke
35. Erebus. The Story of a Ship - Michael Palin
36. The Parisian - Isabella Hammad
37. The Devil’s Star - Jo Nesbo. Reread
38. The Leopard - Jo Nesbo. Reread
39. Headhunters - Jo Nesbo. Reread
40. Humans - Tom Phillips
41. All Together Now - Mike Carter
42. The Jewel in the Crown - Paul Scott
43. Spin - Robert Charles Wilson
44. Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency - Douglas Adams reread
45. The Anarchy - William Dalrymple
46. A Long Finish - Michael Dibdin Reread
47. Warship - Joshua Dalzelle
48. Call to Arms - Joshua Dalzelle
49. Counter strike - Joshua Dalzelle
50. the man who didn’t call - Rosie Walsh
51. The Paths Between Worlds - Paul Antony Jones
52. The History of Modern Britain. 10th Anniversary Edition - Andrew Marr
53. Dark Sacred Night - Michael Connelly
54. The Beekeeper of Aleppo - Christy Lefteri
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#362  Postby UncertainSloth » Dec 21, 2019 4:18 pm

1. the twisted tree - rachel burge - 6/10
2. mr splitfoot - samantha hunt - 5/10
3. a wayne in a manger - gervaise phinn - 5/10
4. the moor - sam haysom - 8/10
5. the general theory of haunting - richard easter - 9/10
6. angry people in local newspapers - alistair coleman- 8/10
7. who let the gods out? - maz evans - 6/10
8. a house of ghosts - w.c. ryan - 8/10
9. a winter haunting - dan simmons - 8/10
10. cunk on everything - philomena cunk - 8/10
11. whistle in the dark - emma healey - 9/10
12. the priest hole - amy cross
13. the book of hidden things - francesco dimitri - 8/10
14. the corset - sarah purcell - 9/10
15, the lighthouse - alison moore - 7/10
16 .comfort break - abandoned - carol mcmahon...so much potential, so little good - kindle novelette...
17. before you wake - adam nevill - 3 short stories - 8/10 -
18. moorehead manor - some bloke - meh...there;s a half decent idea in there somewhere but this author didn't find it....
19. the passage- justin cronin - 10/10 - awesomesauce...
20. hidden company -s e england - 8/10
21. dark isle - david longhorn- 6/10
22. white tears - hari kunzru - 8/10
23. the lucifer chord - fg cottam -7/10
24. the wonder - emma donoghue -8/10...
25. speak - louisa hall - 9/10
26. rotherweird - andrew caldecott- 9/10
27. wakenhyrst- michelle paver-10/10
28. lanny -max porter-9/10
29. the hoarder - jess kidd - 8/10
30. lud in the mist - hope mirrlees - 8/10
31. underland - robert macfarlane - awesome/10
32. the summer we all ran away - cassandra parkin - 8/10
33. the lingering - sj holliday - 8/10
34. the dead men stood together - 8/10
35. elevation - stephen king - 8/10
36. in the night wood - dale bailey - 10/10
37. edgar & lucy - victor lodato - 10/10
38. the glass woman - caroline lea - 8/10
39. how to be right in a world gone wrong - james o'brien - 8/10
40. the enchanted - rene denfeld - 9/10
41. grief is the thing with feathers - max porter - 9/10
42. humans - a brief history of how we fucked it all up - tom phillips - 9/10
43. the asshole survival guide - robert sutton- 7/10
44. the ghost of lily painter - caitlin davies - 8/10
45. haverscroft - sa harris - 8/10
46. don't look back - ben cheetham - 8/10
47. the warlow experiment - alix somebody - 7/10
48. house of windows - john langan - 10/10
49. the jolly corner - henry james - 8/10
50. the bone clocks - david Mitchell - 10/10
51. the auguries - fg cottam - 6/10
52. the reddening - adam nevill - 9/10
53. paperbacks from hell - grady Hendrix - 9/10
54. we don't go back: a watcher' guide to folk horror - howard ingham - 10/10
55. the pale ones - bartholomew bennett - 7/10
56. abandon - blake crouch - 8/10
57. horrorstor - grady Hendrix - 7/10
58. books, baguettes and bedbugs - jeremy mercer - 4/10
59. drift stumble fall - m jonathan lee - 8/10 - quiet, gentle book with a dark heart

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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#363  Postby don't get me started » Dec 25, 2019 1:26 am

1. Complex Systems and Applied Linguistics – Dianne Larsen-Freeman & Lynne Cameron
2. Around the World in 80 Words: A Journey Through the English language – Paul Anthony Jones
3. Cognitive Linguistic analysis of Visual Perception Verbs in Natural Language- With Special Reference to English Verbs ‘Look’ and See’ - Mika Kubota
4. Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction - Elizabeth Holt & Rebecca Clift (Eds.)
5. Making Sense: The Glamorous Story of English Grammar – David Crystal
6.Writing Systems - Geoffrey Sampson
7. 世界の中で、愛をさけぶ。片山恭一
8. Writing Systems of the World: Alphabets, Syllabaries, Pictograms – Akira Nakanishi
9. Flashman at the Charge - George MacDonald Fraser
10. On Bullshit - Harry G. Frankfurt
11. Babel: Around the World in Twenty Languages - Gaston Dorren
12. Uneasy Rider - Mike Carter
13. Talk on the Wild Side: Why language Can't be Tamed - Lane Greene
14. Military Blunders - Saul David
15. Proxima - Stephen Baxter
16. Aliens: Science Asks: Is there Anyone out There? - Jim Al-Khalili (Ed)
17. American Notes - Charles Dickens
18. Four Words for Friend: Why Using More than One Language Matters Now More Than Ever - Marek Kohn
19. Ultima - Srephen Baxter
20. Fuzzy Grammar: A Reader - Bas Aarts, David Denison, Evelein Keizer & Gergana Popova (Eds)
21. Strange Weather in Tokyo - Hiromi Kawakami (Trans Allison Markin Powell)
22. Linguistics: Why it Matters = Geoffrey Pullum
23. Stalag Luft III: The Secret Story - Arthur A. Durand
24. Bodies and their parts: An NSM approach to semantic typology - Anna Wierzbicka
25. Towards a Cognitive Semantics. Vol II Typology and process in Concept Structuring - Leonard Talmy
26. On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth century - Timothy Snyder
27. Common Discourse particles in English Conversation Lawrence C. Schourop
28. The Long Road Home: The Aftermath of the Second World War - Ben Shephard
29. Another Fine Mess: Across the USA in a Ford Model T - Tim Moore
30. Quotatives: New Trends and Sociolinguistic Implications - Isabelle Buchstaller
31. Count and Mass Across Languages - Diane Massam (ed.)
32. Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis. - Jared Diamond
33. Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment of Americans in Hitler's Camps - Mitchell G Bard
34. Republic of Lies: American Conspiracy Theorists and their Surprising Rise to Power - Anna Merlan
35. Humans: A Brief History of How We Fucked It All Up - Tom Phillips
36. All Together Now: One Man's Walk in Search of His Father and a Lost England - Mike Carter
37. Meaning and the English Verb - Geoffrey Leech
38. Count us In: How to Make Maths Real for all of Us - Gareth Ffowc Roberts
39. The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World - J.P. Mallory and D.Q. Adams.
40. Don't Believe a Word: The Surprising Truth about language - David ShariatMadari
41. The Accidental Dictionary: The Remarkable Twists and Turns of English Words - Pail Anthony Jones
42. That's not English: Britishisms, Americanisms and what our English says about US - Erin Moor
43. A Short History of Drunkenness: How, Why, Where and When Humankind Has Got Merry from the Stone Age to the Present - Mark Forsyth
44. The Five Minute Linguist: Bite Sized Essays on Language and Linguistics - Caroline Myrick & Walt Wolfram (Eds).
45. The Origin of Language: Tracing the Evolution of the Mother Tongue - Merritt Ruhlen
46. Learner English: A Teacher's Guide to Interference and Other Problems - Michael Swan & Bernard Smith (Eds.)
47. Matter - Iain M Banks
48. The Not Terribly Good Book of Heroic Failures - Stephen Pile
49. Spin - Robert Charles Wilson]
50. Rethinking Universals: How Rarities Affect Linguistic Theory - Jan Wohlgemuth and Michael Cysouw (Eds.)
51. Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky
52. Rara and Raissma: Documenting the Fringes of Linguistic Diversity - Jan Wohlgemuth and Michael Cysouw (Eds.)
53. Kinds, Things and Stuff: Mass terms and Generics - Francis Jeffry Pelletier (Ed.)
54. Mud, Blood and Poppycock - Gordon Corrigan

55. Watching War Films With my Dad: A memoir- Al Murray

Murray is well known in the UK for his stand up character 'The pub landlord' who regales his audience with stream of consciousness bombast, hyper patriotic rants about the superiority of the British and dodgy historical accounts to back up his ludicrous prejudice. In this book he steps out of character and deals with the way that consciousness of military history, especially British WW2 history permeated his childhood and shaped his worldview. He recounts joint viewings of staple WW2 films with his dad that are accompanied by a constant background of nitpicking over vehicle types and markings, uniforms, and the finer points of historical accuracy that are the hallmarks of the true nerd. He also engages in some pretty interesting historical discussions about the nature of history, its recollection and partisanship. Underneath the anecdotage, humour, wit and self- deprecation there are some very interesting points made.

There was a good blast of nostalgia when he recounted his childhood days spent playing with Action Man and making Airfix and Tamiya models. Ahhh...the Stug III with side skirts and Das Reich Kursk markings that I spent so much time on that Christmas in the early 80's. Where are the snows of yesteryear?

The tone of the book was a little uneven in places especially at the beginning and the author's day job as comedian relying on improvisation, digression and going for the laugh was in evidence. The writing settled down a bit in the later part of the book and despite his best efforts at distraction, his intelligence and deep knowledge of the subject matter showed through.
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#364  Postby Fallible » Dec 27, 2019 12:46 am

1. The Terror - Dan Simmons.
2. Milkman - Anna Burns.
3. The Long Take - Robin Robertson.
4. The Witchfinder's Sister - Beth Underdown.
5. The Tattooist of Auschwitz - Heather Morris.
6. Bellman & Black - Dianne Setterfield.
7. The Outrun - Amy Liptrot.
8. Origin - Dan Brown.
9. Bodies of Water - V.H. Leslie.
10. The Fireman - Joe Hill.
11. Melmoth - Sarah Perry.
12. Devil's Day - Andrew Michael Hurley.
13. Imagine Me Gone - Adam Haslett.
14. Slade House - David Mitchell.
15. Fire and Blood: 300 Years Before A Game of Thrones (A Targaryen History) - George R.R. Martin.
16. Arrowood - Laura McHugh.
17. The Hoarder - Jess Kidd.
18. Wakenhyrst - Michelle Paver.
19. The Leftovers - Tom Perrotta.
20. How to be Right - James O’Brien.
21. Chavs: the Demonisation of the Working Class - Owen Jones.
22. Number 11 - Jonathan Coe.
23. The Warlow Experiment - Alix Nathan.
24. The Gatekeeper - Russ Kane. Garbage.
25. In the Night Wood - Dale Bailey.
26. Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology - Leah Remini.
27. The Green Man - Kingsley Amis.
28. The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood. Re-read
29. The Institute - Stephen King.
30. White Fragility:Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism - Robin DiAngelo.
31. The House of Sleep - Jonathan Coe.
32. Books, Baguettes and Bedbugs: the Left Bank World of Shakespeare and Co. - Jeremy Mercer.
33. She Said - Jodi Kantor & Megan Twohey.
34. Brave - Rose McGowan.
35. Northern Lights - Philip Pullman. re-read.
36. The Subtle Knife - Philip Pullman. re-read
37. The Amber Spyglass - Philip Pullman. re-read
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#365  Postby felltoearth » Dec 27, 2019 10:46 pm

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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#366  Postby Fallible » Dec 27, 2019 10:58 pm

1. The Terror - Dan Simmons.
2. Milkman - Anna Burns.
3. The Long Take - Robin Robertson.
4. The Witchfinder's Sister - Beth Underdown.
5. The Tattooist of Auschwitz - Heather Morris.
6. Bellman & Black - Dianne Setterfield.
7. The Outrun - Amy Liptrot.
8. Origin - Dan Brown.
9. Bodies of Water - V.H. Leslie.
10. The Fireman - Joe Hill.
11. Melmoth - Sarah Perry.
12. Devil's Day - Andrew Michael Hurley.
13. Imagine Me Gone - Adam Haslett.
14. Slade House - David Mitchell.
15. Fire and Blood: 300 Years Before A Game of Thrones (A Targaryen History) - George R.R. Martin.
16. Arrowood - Laura McHugh.
17. The Hoarder - Jess Kidd.
18. Wakenhyrst - Michelle Paver.
19. The Leftovers - Tom Perrotta.
20. How to be Right - James O’Brien.
21. Chavs: the Demonisation of the Working Class - Owen Jones.
22. Number 11 - Jonathan Coe.
23. The Warlow Experiment - Alix Nathan.
24. The Gatekeeper - Russ Kane. Garbage.
25. In the Night Wood - Dale Bailey.
26. Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology - Leah Remini.
27. The Green Man - Kingsley Amis.
28. The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood. Re-read
29. The Institute - Stephen King.
30. White Fragility:Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism - Robin DiAngelo.
31. The House of Sleep - Jonathan Coe.
32. Books, Baguettes and Bedbugs: the Left Bank World of Shakespeare and Co. - Jeremy Mercer.
33. She Said - Jodi Kantor & Megan Twohey.
34. Brave - Rose McGowan.
35. Northern Lights - Philip Pullman. re-read.
36. The Subtle Knife - Philip Pullman. re-read
37. The Amber Spyglass - Philip Pullman. re-read
38. An 80s Childhood: From He-Man to Shell Suits - Michael A. Johnson.
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#367  Postby don't get me started » Dec 28, 2019 12:46 am

1. Complex Systems and Applied Linguistics – Dianne Larsen-Freeman & Lynne Cameron
2. Around the World in 80 Words: A Journey Through the English language – Paul Anthony Jones
3. Cognitive Linguistic analysis of Visual Perception Verbs in Natural Language- With Special Reference to English Verbs ‘Look’ and See’ - Mika Kubota
4. Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction - Elizabeth Holt & Rebecca Clift (Eds.)
5. Making Sense: The Glamorous Story of English Grammar – David Crystal
6.Writing Systems - Geoffrey Sampson
7. 世界の中で、愛をさけぶ。片山恭一
8. Writing Systems of the World: Alphabets, Syllabaries, Pictograms – Akira Nakanishi
9. Flashman at the Charge - George MacDonald Fraser
10. On Bullshit - Harry G. Frankfurt
11. Babel: Around the World in Twenty Languages - Gaston Dorren
12. Uneasy Rider - Mike Carter
13. Talk on the Wild Side: Why language Can't be Tamed - Lane Greene
14. Military Blunders - Saul David
15. Proxima - Stephen Baxter
16. Aliens: Science Asks: Is there Anyone out There? - Jim Al-Khalili (Ed)
17. American Notes - Charles Dickens
18. Four Words for Friend: Why Using More than One Language Matters Now More Than Ever - Marek Kohn
19. Ultima - Srephen Baxter
20. Fuzzy Grammar: A Reader - Bas Aarts, David Denison, Evelein Keizer & Gergana Popova (Eds)
21. Strange Weather in Tokyo - Hiromi Kawakami (Trans Allison Markin Powell)
22. Linguistics: Why it Matters = Geoffrey Pullum
23. Stalag Luft III: The Secret Story - Arthur A. Durand
24. Bodies and their parts: An NSM approach to semantic typology - Anna Wierzbicka
25. Towards a Cognitive Semantics. Vol II Typology and process in Concept Structuring - Leonard Talmy
26. On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth century - Timothy Snyder
27. Common Discourse particles in English Conversation Lawrence C. Schourop
28. The Long Road Home: The Aftermath of the Second World War - Ben Shephard
29. Another Fine Mess: Across the USA in a Ford Model T - Tim Moore
30. Quotatives: New Trends and Sociolinguistic Implications - Isabelle Buchstaller
31. Count and Mass Across Languages - Diane Massam (ed.)
32. Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis. - Jared Diamond
33. Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment of Americans in Hitler's Camps - Mitchell G Bard
34. Republic of Lies: American Conspiracy Theorists and their Surprising Rise to Power - Anna Merlan
35. Humans: A Brief History of How We Fucked It All Up - Tom Phillips
36. All Together Now: One Man's Walk in Search of His Father and a Lost England - Mike Carter
37. Meaning and the English Verb - Geoffrey Leech
38. Count us In: How to Make Maths Real for all of Us - Gareth Ffowc Roberts
39. The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World - J.P. Mallory and D.Q. Adams.
40. Don't Believe a Word: The Surprising Truth about language - David ShariatMadari
41. The Accidental Dictionary: The Remarkable Twists and Turns of English Words - Pail Anthony Jones
42. That's not English: Britishisms, Americanisms and what our English says about US - Erin Moor
43. A Short History of Drunkenness: How, Why, Where and When Humankind Has Got Merry from the Stone Age to the Present - Mark Forsyth
44. The Five Minute Linguist: Bite Sized Essays on Language and Linguistics - Caroline Myrick & Walt Wolfram (Eds).
45. The Origin of Language: Tracing the Evolution of the Mother Tongue - Merritt Ruhlen
46. Learner English: A Teacher's Guide to Interference and Other Problems - Michael Swan & Bernard Smith (Eds.)
47. Matter - Iain M Banks
48. The Not Terribly Good Book of Heroic Failures - Stephen Pile
49. Spin - Robert Charles Wilson]
50. Rethinking Universals: How Rarities Affect Linguistic Theory - Jan Wohlgemuth and Michael Cysouw (Eds.)
51. Children of Time - Adrian Tchaikovsky
52. Rara and Raissma: Documenting the Fringes of Linguistic Diversity - Jan Wohlgemuth and Michael Cysouw (Eds.)
53. Kinds, Things and Stuff: Mass terms and Generics - Francis Jeffry Pelletier (Ed.)
54. Mud, Blood and Poppycock - Gordon Corrigan
55. Watching War Films With my Dad: A memoir- Al Murray

56. Negation in English and Other languages = Otto Jespersen

151 pp.

This is a volume in the series 'forgotten Books' that produces a facsimile copy of a long out of print work. This book dates from 1917 and it was a challenge to read for a variety of different reasons. The print on the page varied considerably in readabiity from crisp and neat to photocopy of a photocopy blurry. The style of the book was also a bit of a challenge. Scholarly writing a century ago was done very differently.

Jespersen (who was a giant of early 20th century linguistics), gives examples from a variety of different languages- but without translations! I was more or less able to get the German examples, but the other examples of the finer points of negation in French and Danish and other European languages passed me by. The examples from languages outside Europe was sparse. Eurocentrism of the early 20th century may be a factor, but also a lack of data on Amazonian and Papuan languages was undoubtedly part of the equation as well.

Another marked difference from modern linguistics was the reliance on literary examples. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen, Dickens and the others are very widely cited. (And the citation style was pretty hard on the eyes.) It illustrates once again that before the invention of reliable, high quality and portable recording equipment, linguistic investigations were largely based on intuition and literary sources. No corpus and concordances at the click of a mouse for these guys.

So, the material itself was very interesting. Negation is a very nuanced thing in languages, with a variety of strategies for making things negative being observed. Jespersen describes the cycle whereby negative particles get reduced to a tiny stub and then get added to in order to make the hearable again - French 'ne' being a classic example, being reduced to marginal hearability before the addition of 'pas' to give the modern ne ...pas' literally 'Not a step'. English went through the same cycle with ne > ne a wit (like not a jot)> nawit > nought > not.

Jespersen also tackles the thorny issue of double negatives and despite the logicians' assertions that two negatives make a positive, notes that double negation with negative meaning (I ain't done nothing, I haven't spoke to no-one etc.) is a very widespread feature in natural languages. Language ain't logic it seems. :think:

There is also an interesting chapter on the negative prefixes in English 'un' and 'in/im/il/ig'. On page 144 the author notes 'Still, the rule obtains in English as in other languages that most adjectives with un- or in- have a deprecatory sense: we have 'unworthy', 'undue', 'imperfect' etc. but it is not possible to form similar adjectives from 'wicked', 'foolish' or 'terrible'.'

This points to an underlying sense that a negative is something that exists in a somehow adjunct sense to the positive, a function carried out after the positive has been conceived, rather than the positive being an operation carried out on a basic negative perception of some aspect of the world.

An interesting book, despite the challenges. I've ordered a few more up-to date books on linguistic negation to see where we are a century on from this book.
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#368  Postby crazyfitter » Dec 30, 2019 4:01 pm

1. Long Road From Jarrow - Stuart Maconie
2. Death Without Company - Craig Johnson
3. The Shortest History of Germany - James Hawes
4. The Last Coyote - Michael Connelly
5. Kindness Goes Unpunished - Craig Johnson
6. Lethal White - Robert Galbraith
7. The Girl in the Woods - Camilla Lackberg
8. Making Sense: The Glamorous Story of English Grammar – David Crystal
9. Another Man's Moccasins - Craig Johnson
10. Austerity. The Demolition of the Welfare State and the rise of the Zombie Economy - Kerry-Anne Mendoza
11. Space Opera - Catherynne M. Valente. I’ve abandoned this book at 90%. Please don’t waste your life with it.
12. The Steerswoman - Rosemary Kirsten
13. The Outskirters Secret - Rosemary Kirsten
14. The Lost Steersman - Rosemary Kirsten
15. The Language of Power - Rosemary Kirsten. Looking forward to the next 2 when published.
16. Personal - Lee Child
17. And The Weak Suffer What They Must? - Yanis Varoufakis
18. The Birdcage - Clive Aslet
19. Semiosis - Sue Burke
20. The Art of War - Sun Tzu
21. Light - M. John Harrison
22. Past Tense - Lee Child
23. Nobody Walks - Mick Herron
24. London Rules - Mick Herron
25. The Death And Life Of Bobby Z - Don Winslow
26. The Good Detective - John McMahon
27. Transcription - Kate Atkinson
28. Permafrost - Alastair Reynolds
29. The Thieves of Manhattan - Adam Langer
30. The Clockmakers Daughter - Kate Morton
31. Underland - Robert Macfarlane
32. Let Go My Hand - Edward Docx
33. A Question of Blood - Ian Rankin
34. Rama II - Arthur C Clarke
35. Erebus. The Story of a Ship - Michael Palin
36. The Parisian - Isabella Hammad
37. The Devil’s Star - Jo Nesbo. Reread
38. The Leopard - Jo Nesbo. Reread
39. Headhunters - Jo Nesbo. Reread
40. Humans - Tom Phillips
41. All Together Now - Mike Carter
42. The Jewel in the Crown - Paul Scott
43. Spin - Robert Charles Wilson
44. Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency - Douglas Adams reread
45. The Anarchy - William Dalrymple
46. A Long Finish - Michael Dibdin Reread
47. Warship - Joshua Dalzelle
48. Call to Arms - Joshua Dalzelle
49. Counter strike - Joshua Dalzelle
50. the man who didn’t call - Rosie Walsh
51. The Paths Between Worlds - Paul Antony Jones
52. The History of Modern Britain. 10th Anniversary Edition - Andrew Marr
53. Dark Sacred Night - Michael Connelly
54. The Beekeeper of Aleppo - Christy Lefteri
55. Little Siberia - Antti Tuomainen

That’s my lot for the year, most I’ve ever read and quite pleased with myself.
Happy new year to you all.
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#369  Postby don't get me started » Dec 31, 2019 1:10 am

Yes, I think I've reached my total for the year...I'm unlikely to get through the next few hundred pages of my current read in the last few hours of this year. (I'll be pursuing moderate to advanced levels of intoxication later in the day.) :drunk:

A reasonably good year with some pretty heavyweight academic books among the titles. I'm quite satisfied with the list. Although the number 50 is fairly arbitrary, I enjoy the discipline it imposes on me. I also like the fact that my little boy sees me sitting down to get on with a book on a regular basis. I hope that it serves to kindle his interest in reading and that he comes to see it as a thing that people just 'do'. (Unlike some other members of my family in the UK who don't have any books in the house...bizarre, right?)

He is just embarking on the decade long process of learning to be literate in Japanese, but he already loves looking in books about countries of the world, the human body, space and the solar system (but not dinosaurs, funnily enough...unlike his dad at that age!). We often read together and he can already beat me on flag recognition games! ( 'Why don't you know the flag of Kiribati, even though you are a professor?' he asked me the other day!) :lol:

I've got a few thousand yen left in my book budget from the uni, so I'll go on a spree and stock up on some of the items that have been sitting on my wish list for a while. 2020 may have a slightly lower book total. I've been working on my own book for a couple of years now and I'm up to about 25,000 words, which is a little under halfway by my reckoning. 2020 might be the year I make a big push and try to get it finished. That will require a lot of re-reading and referencing so I might not make it to 50 books in the 2020 challenge.

Anyways, congrats to all the other book challengers, whatever number you reached. Thank you for your efforts which have constantly inspired me. I hope that my write-ups have been at least occasionally interesting to the readership here.

Happy new year to you all. :cheers:
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#370  Postby Blip » Dec 31, 2019 2:02 pm

1. Bang!: The Complete History of the Universe by Brian May, Patrick Moore and Chris Lintott
2. Unsheltered by Barbara Kingsolver
3. Wakenhyrst by Michelle Paver
4. Experimental Film by Gemma Files
5. Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney
6. The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen
7. The Green Road by Anne Enright
8. Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín
9. The Man Who Spoke Snakish by Andrus Kivirähk, translated by Christopher Moseley
10. The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry
11. Hope: A Tragedy by Shalom Auslander
12. West by Carys Davies
13. The Overstory by Richard Powers
14. Quichotte by Salman Rushdie
15. The Testaments by Margaret Atwood
16. Round Ireland with a Fridge by Tony Hawks
17. Black Leopard Red Wolf by Marlon James
18. John Crow's Devil by Marlon James
19. Stay with Me by Ayobami Adebayo
20. Harvest by Jim Crace

Finishing the year on a high note with that one, even though my list was so short for the second year running. Thanks to my fellow readers for sharing their lists and here's to more of them in 2020. :cheers:
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#371  Postby UncertainSloth » Dec 31, 2019 11:24 pm

1. the twisted tree - rachel burge - 6/10
2. mr splitfoot - samantha hunt - 5/10
3. a wayne in a manger - gervaise phinn - 5/10
4. the moor - sam haysom - 8/10
5. the general theory of haunting - richard easter - 9/10
6. angry people in local newspapers - alistair coleman- 8/10
7. who let the gods out? - maz evans - 6/10
8. a house of ghosts - w.c. ryan - 8/10
9. a winter haunting - dan simmons - 8/10
10. cunk on everything - philomena cunk - 8/10
11. whistle in the dark - emma healey - 9/10
12. the priest hole - amy cross
13. the book of hidden things - francesco dimitri - 8/10
14. the corset - sarah purcell - 9/10
15, the lighthouse - alison moore - 7/10
16 .comfort break - abandoned - carol mcmahon...so much potential, so little good - kindle novelette...
17. before you wake - adam nevill - 3 short stories - 8/10 -
18. moorehead manor - some bloke - meh...there;s a half decent idea in there somewhere but this author didn't find it....
19. the passage- justin cronin - 10/10 - awesomesauce...
20. hidden company -s e england - 8/10
21. dark isle - david longhorn- 6/10
22. white tears - hari kunzru - 8/10
23. the lucifer chord - fg cottam -7/10
24. the wonder - emma donoghue -8/10...
25. speak - louisa hall - 9/10
26. rotherweird - andrew caldecott- 9/10
27. wakenhyrst- michelle paver-10/10
28. lanny -max porter-9/10
29. the hoarder - jess kidd - 8/10
30. lud in the mist - hope mirrlees - 8/10
31. underland - robert macfarlane - awesome/10
32. the summer we all ran away - cassandra parkin - 8/10
33. the lingering - sj holliday - 8/10
34. the dead men stood together - 8/10
35. elevation - stephen king - 8/10
36. in the night wood - dale bailey - 10/10
37. edgar & lucy - victor lodato - 10/10
38. the glass woman - caroline lea - 8/10
39. how to be right in a world gone wrong - james o'brien - 8/10
40. the enchanted - rene denfeld - 9/10
41. grief is the thing with feathers - max porter - 9/10
42. humans - a brief history of how we fucked it all up - tom phillips - 9/10
43. the asshole survival guide - robert sutton- 7/10
44. the ghost of lily painter - caitlin davies - 8/10
45. haverscroft - sa harris - 8/10
46. don't look back - ben cheetham - 8/10
47. the warlow experiment - alix somebody - 7/10
48. house of windows - john langan - 10/10
49. the jolly corner - henry james - 8/10
50. the bone clocks - david Mitchell - 10/10
51. the auguries - fg cottam - 6/10
52. the reddening - adam nevill - 9/10
53. paperbacks from hell - grady Hendrix - 9/10
54. we don't go back: a watcher' guide to folk horror - howard ingham - 10/10
55. the pale ones - bartholomew bennett - 7/10
56. abandon - blake crouch - 8/10
57. horrorstor - grady Hendrix - 7/10
58. books, baguettes and bedbugs - jeremy mercer - 4/10
59. drift stumble fall - m jonathan lee - 8/10
60, and the last: other words for smoke - sarah maria griffin - 8/10 - an odd little book, part ya, part dark horror, part magical realism, part magical...one of those that turned much darker in the second half.....reminded me of a book I've read that I now can't remember the name of...

anyway, book of the year? toss up between underland & the passage, I think...

happy new year, readers everywhere - see you in the new thread & thanks for being excellent company in here.... :cheers:

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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#372  Postby Spearthrower » Jan 02, 2020 6:56 am

don't get me started wrote:
How are you getting on with the Thai copulas? (เป็น bpen, อยู่ yuu and คือ keu) I've been looking at 'be verbs' and copulas in various languages (they are the same in English but not so in other languages) and the Thai ones are a bit of a head scratcher to be honest.


Sorry for the aside here folks:



เป็น bpen - the closest to the English sense of be, i.e. to be something
-I am your father, Luke
-It's a pen

คือ keu - most simple way is to think of this as 'equals'.
-1+1=2 (you can use keu)

But also works when 2 parts of a sentence equate
-That house is my home (keu)
-My favourite drink is coffee

Personally, I only use this when I am doing mathematics in Thai (rarely) or when I am asking what something means: คืออะไร

อยู่ yuu - to be somewhere in the sense of a location or here, to stay

Even works in more complex ways than how we would use 'be'.

-What are you doing?
-I am working -ทำงานอยู่ (work here)


None of them help adjectives - you either just add an adjective to a subject, or use have มี (mee) - i.e I am happy -มีความสุข
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#373  Postby NamelessFaceless » Jan 02, 2020 2:38 pm

Audiobooks in Italics

1. The Hound of the Baskervilles - Arthur Conan Doyle
2. The Secret Adversary - Agatha Christie
3. The Quiet American - Graham Greene
4. Baltimore Blues - Laura Lippman
5. People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished From the Streets of Tokyo - And The Evil That Swallowed Her Up - Richard Lloyd Parry
6. Miao Dao - Joyce Carol Oates
7. Catch Me if You Can - Frank W. Abegnale
8. Some Do Not . . . - Ford Madox Ford
9. Mafia Prince - Phillip Leonetti, Scott Burnstein, and Christopher Graziano
10. Alex Rider: Skeleton Key - Anthony Horowitz
11. No More Parades - Ford Madox Ford
12. A Man Could Stand Up - Ford Madox Ford
13. The Mystery of Edwin Drood - Charles Dickens
14. Animal Farm - George Orwell
15. Bloodchild and Other Stories - Octavia E. Butler
16. The End of Eternity - Isaac Asimov
17. Shards of Honor - Lois McMaster Bujold
18. Last Post - Ford Madox Ford
19. Farewell: The Greatest Spy Story of the Twentieth Century - Sergei Kostin, Eric Raynaud
20. A Tale of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
21. A Higher Call - Adam Makos
22. Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
23. What It Is Like to Go to War - Karl Marlantes
24. Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
25. SEAL Team Six - Howard E. Wasdin, Stephen Templin

26. Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
27. Goodbye, Darkness - William Manchester
28. Silas Marner - George Eliot
29. Tess of the D'Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
30. The Magdalen Girls - V.S. Alexander
31. Ivanhoe - Sir Walter Scott
32. Finegan's Wake - James Joyce :dance: :dance: :dance:
33. Finegan's Wake: A Plot Summary - John Gordon :dopey:
34. All the Lasting Things - David Hopson
35. The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
36. The Book of the Unnamed Midwife - Meg Elison
37. The Satanic Verses - Salmon Rushdie
38. The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights - Sir James Knowles
39. Walden - Henry David Thoreau
40. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Ken Kesey
41. Arrowsmith - Sinclair Lewis
42. Fear - L. Ron Hubbard
43. The Time Machine - H.G. Wells
44. The Body in the Dales - J.R. Ellis
45. Those Who Wander: America's Lost Street Kids - Vivian Ho
46. Little Women - Louisa May Alcott
47. The Testaments - Margaret Atwood
48. Disturbed - Jennifer Jaynes
49. Jacob's Room - Virginia Woolf
50. The Castle of Otranto - Horace Walpole
51. A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
52. Doctrine & Covenants - Joseph Smith, et al (I've been reading this a little at a time for the last 2-3 years, but I finally finished it!)
53. The King in Yellow - Robert W. Chambers
54. The Lady With the Dog and Other Stories - Anton Chekhov
55. The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Volume I - Edgar Allan Poe
56. The Man Who Was Thursday - G.K. Chesterton
57. Cane - Jean Toomer
58. Bright Line Eating - Susan Pierce Thompson
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Re: Book Challenge Thread 2019

#374  Postby don't get me started » Jan 02, 2020 3:01 pm

Spearthrower wrote:
don't get me started wrote:
How are you getting on with the Thai copulas? (เป็น bpen, อยู่ yuu and คือ keu) I've been looking at 'be verbs' and copulas in various languages (they are the same in English but not so in other languages) and the Thai ones are a bit of a head scratcher to be honest.


Sorry for the aside here folks:



เป็น bpen - the closest to the English sense of be, i.e. to be something
-I am your father, Luke
-It's a pen

คือ keu - most simple way is to think of this as 'equals'.
-1+1=2 (you can use keu)

But also works when 2 parts of a sentence equate
-That house is my home (keu)
-My favourite drink is coffee

Personally, I only use this when I am doing mathematics in Thai (rarely) or when I am asking what something means: คืออะไร

อยู่ yuu - to be somewhere in the sense of a location or here, to stay

Even works in more complex ways than how we would use 'be'.

-What are you doing?
-I am working -ทำงานอยู่ (work here)


None of them help adjectives - you either just add an adjective to a subject, or use have มี (mee) - i.e I am happy -มีความสุข



Thanks Spearthrower. Much appreciated.
I've watched a few videos on Thai be verbs and its always good to get the material presented by a different presenter. I hadn't seen that one before.
I made the mistake of tracking down some papers on Thai copulas in Google Scholar...talk about muddying the waters. There is a lot to take in with this topic, including negation of existential verbs.
As far as adjectives go, it is a bit like Russian. In that language you just drop the copula in the present tense (I happy, you happy, etc) but you have to use it in the past tense...Hungarian uses it in all tenses except for the third person present tense (singular and plural) where it is omitted...just for shits and giggles it seems.

I'm well impressed that you can attempt arithmetic in Thai... I can count a bit in Thai but only in sequence. Three and four are the (almost the)same as Japanese (san, shi) but apart from that I have to start at one and work my way through to ten to get the number I want.
Anyways, thanks for the post. I'll have an attempt next time I'm there in a few weeks and see how I get on. Probably mess it up and then be told ไม่เป็นไร...
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