The Book Thread 2021

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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#221  Postby UncertainSloth » Oct 26, 2021 4:12 pm

1. james brogden - the narrows - 8/10
2. nora roberts - of blood and bone - 8/10
3. nora roberts - the rise of magicks - 8/10
4. karen thompsn walker - the dreamers - 7/10
5. sophie draper - cuckoo - 7/10
6. laura carlin - the wicked cometh - 7/10
7. vikram palakar - the night theatre - 7/10
8. m r carey - the trials of koli - 9/10
9. bridget collins - the binding - 9/10
10. jac jemc - the grip of it - 7/10
11. carolyn jess-cooke - the boy who could see demons - 9/10
12. daisy johnson - everything under - 7/10
13. paraic o'donnell - house on vesper sands - 7/10
14. claire north - the gameshouse - 8/10 -
15. martin edwards - the coffin trail - 6/10
16. laird hunt - neverhome - 8/10
17. jesmyn ward - sing, unburied, sing - 8/10
18. edward parnell - ghostland: in search of a haunted country - 10/10
19. james brogden - the plague stones - 8/10
20. jonathan coe - the dwarves of death - 7/10
21. catherine burns - the visitors - 8/10
22. jonathan coe - the accidental woman - 6/10
23. gemma files - we will all go down together - 10/10
24. christopher ransom - the people next door - 6/10
25. andrew pyper - the killing circle - 9/10
26. alma katsu - the hunger - 9/10
27. jess kidd - himself - 9/10
28. andrew pyper - the only child - 8/10
29. scarlett thomas - our tragic universe - 9/10 - loved mr y, no idea why it's taken me so long to get round to this as it's been on our shelves for years but i've made a vow to read most of my books before buying more...anyway, a storyless story about storyless stories and historyless histories...loved it

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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#222  Postby don't get me started » Oct 29, 2021 4:17 am

1. Pragmatic Meaning and Cognition – Sophia S.A. Marmaridou
2. Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany and Japan - Randall Hansen
3. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics – René Dirven and Marjolijn Verspoor (Eds.)
4. Age of Static: How TV Explains Modern Britain – Phil Harrison
5. The Secret of Our Success: How Culture is Driving Human Evolution, Domesticating our Species and Making us Smarter – Joseph Henrich
6. Heroic Failure and the British - Stephanie Barczewski
7. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain - Maryanne Wolf
8. Language Soup: A Taste of How Diverse People Around the World Communicate - Kathryn A. T. Knox
9. A Place for everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical order – Judith Flanders
10. Contrastive Analysis - Carl James
11. Impossible Languages- Andrea Moro
12. Languages in the World: How History, Culture and Politics Shape Language – Jukie tetel Andresen and Phillip M. Carter
13. HHhH - Laurent Binet (Translated from the French by Sam Taylor)
14. Impoliteness: Using Language to Cause Offense – Jonathan Culpeper
15. Ethosyntax: Explorations in Grammar and Culture – N. J. Enfield (Ed.)
16. Second Language Speech Fluency: From Research to Practice – Parvaneh Tavakoli & Clare Wright.
17. At Day's Close: Night in Times Past – A. Roger Ekirch
18. Language Shock: Understanding the Culture of Conversation – Michael Agar
19. Possessives in English: An Exploration in Cognitive Grammar - John R. Taylor
20. I saw the Dog: How Language Works – Alexandra Aikhenvald.
21. The German War: A Nation under Arms, 1939 – 1945 – Nicholas Stargardt
22. Civilizations – Laurent Binet
23. Adjective Classes: A Cross-linguistic Typology - R. M. W. Dixon & A. Aikhenvald (Eds.)
24. Linguistic Diversity in Space and Time – Johanna Nichols
25. How to behave badly in Elizabethan England - Ruth Goodman
26. In the Land of Invented Languages: Adventures in Linguistic Creativity, Madness and Genius – Arika Okrent
27. Foundation – Isaac Asimov
28. One Man and his Bike – Mike Carter
29. The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps – Edwards Brooke Hitching
30. Operation Mincemeat – Ben Macintyre
31. L2 interactional competence and development - J.K. Hall, J. Hellermann & S.P. Doehler, (Eds.)
32. A Natural History of negation – Laurence R. Horn
33. Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers – Mary Roach
34. Highly Irregular: Why Tough, Through, and Dough Don't RhymeAnd Other Oddities of the English Language – Arika Okrent
35. What Language Is: And What It Isn't and What It Could Be - John McWhorter

36. Inner Speech: new Voices Peter Langland-Hassan & Agustín Vicente (Eds.)

336. pp

A collection of chapters by a variety of authors on the nature of inner speech, the way in which we experience thinking on a day-to-day basis. This is a topic that has long fascinated me and there was plenty to sink my teeth into in this volume. Part 1 dealt with the nature of inner speech, it’s causes and contents, including some robust discussions on the auditory nature of inner speech (it does indeed seem to have an auditory component, despite being not in anyway connected to sound waves transmitted through the medium of air). Also ‘Inner speech can be produced with one’s own or someone else’s voice’ (p. 156) lending support to the auditory nature of the phenomenon. It also seems to be the case that inner speech takes place in specific language. That is, persons experience inner speech as taking place in a language. (p.81) This goes against the notion that the experience of inner speech is merely the surface and perceptible form of what can be referred to as ‘mentalese’…thought that does not occur in any specific language. Langland Hassan explains his view that ‘Inner speech is always keyed to a specific natural language’ making a subtle distinction between being 'keyed' to a language occurring 'in' a language. The point is explained in detail in the text.

The link between inner speech and physiology was described. ‘During rest, breathing is symmetrical, with inspiration and expiration phases displaying equal duration. In overt speech, the cycle is strongly asymmetrical, with a short inspiration and long expirtioin during which speech is emitted. Conrad and Schönle have shown that inner displays a slightly prolonged expiratory phase. They concluded that motor processes are at play during inner speech.' (p. 135)

There is also the speed of inner speech to consider. Experiments show that inner speech rates can reach up to 4,000 words per minute which is ‘unattainable in overt mode. These findings suggest that verbalization is condensed at the syntactic and lexical levels. [ …] These studies suggest that some of the phonological or articulatory involved in overt speech are absent in covert mode’. (p. 134).

Some people claim to not experience inner speech, although the claims are unverifiable and the ways in which people can delude themselves about the nature of their thoughts is given ample treatment in several chapters. Leaving the discussion of whether everyone experiences inner speech or not to one side, the sheer prevalence of inner speech in our daily lives is notable. ‘Heavey and Hurlburt (2008) estimate that around one fourth of people conscious waking life consists of inner speech. This frequency illustrates the importance of this cognitive activity, as inner speech serves a host of very important cognitive functions.’ (p.278)

I’ll leave off here with an extended quote from p. 179 which I thought would be of interest to the membership here, concerning the nature of delusion.

“A presupposition is a delusion, not merely an ignorance. Ignorance is simply lacking knowledge; delusion is believing that it is not necessary to know. Ignorance is lacking skill; delusion is believing that one’s current skill is good enough. Ignorance is a vacuum whose natural tendency is to be filled up; delusion is hyperbaric pressure whose natural tendency is to resist any new content. Ignorance is created by the universe- we are born ignorant. Delusion is self-created – it arises from some prior (but inadequate) skill acquisition. […] Delusion makes it seem like you already know what you don’t actually know; makes it seem like you don’t need to know what you actually need; makes it seem like you are more skillful than you are; makes the important seem trivial; makes the trivial seem important. Delusion always seems reasonable, seems intelligent, seems necessary, seems Right with a capital R, seems Good with a capital G, seems True, seems Virtuous.”

Telling words.
O tempora o mores.

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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#223  Postby UncertainSloth » Oct 29, 2021 8:11 pm

1. james brogden - the narrows - 8/10
2. nora roberts - of blood and bone - 8/10
3. nora roberts - the rise of magicks - 8/10
4. karen thompsn walker - the dreamers - 7/10
5. sophie draper - cuckoo - 7/10
6. laura carlin - the wicked cometh - 7/10
7. vikram palakar - the night theatre - 7/10
8. m r carey - the trials of koli - 9/10
9. bridget collins - the binding - 9/10
10. jac jemc - the grip of it - 7/10
11. carolyn jess-cooke - the boy who could see demons - 9/10
12. daisy johnson - everything under - 7/10
13. paraic o'donnell - house on vesper sands - 7/10
14. claire north - the gameshouse - 8/10 -
15. martin edwards - the coffin trail - 6/10
16. laird hunt - neverhome - 8/10
17. jesmyn ward - sing, unburied, sing - 8/10
18. edward parnell - ghostland: in search of a haunted country - 10/10
19. james brogden - the plague stones - 8/10
20. jonathan coe - the dwarves of death - 7/10
21. catherine burns - the visitors - 8/10
22. jonathan coe - the accidental woman - 6/10
23. gemma files - we will all go down together - 10/10
24. christopher ransom - the people next door - 6/10
25. andrew pyper - the killing circle - 9/10
26. alma katsu - the hunger - 9/10
27. jess kidd - himself - 9/10
28. andrew pyper - the only child - 8/10
29. scarlett thomas - our tragic universe - 9/10
30. melissa bailey - the medici mirror - 7/10 - half decent idea, half decently written about...the darkness of it all bumps it up a point or two

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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#224  Postby Blip » Oct 30, 2021 8:12 am

1. The Calcutta Chromosome by Amitav Ghosh
2. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
3. Thrush Green by Miss Read
4. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
5. Winter in Thrush Green by Miss Read
The Shortest Day by Colm Tóibín
6. The Binding by Bridget Collins
7. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
8. The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu translated by Joel Martinsen
9. Death's End by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
10. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
11. The Ebony Tower by John Fowles
12. The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier translated by Robin Buss
13. Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan
14. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende
15. From a Low and Quiet Sea by Donal Ryan
16. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
17. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
18. Front Page News by Sadie Gordon Richmond
19. The Split by Sharon Bolton
20. Outline by Rachel Cusk
21. Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell
22. The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
23. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
24. The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
25. The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey
26. Battles at Thrush Green by Miss Read
27. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota
28. If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor
29. Still Life by Sarah Winman
30. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
31. Elmet by Fiona Mozley
32. Bosworth: the birth of the Tudors by Chris Skidmore
33. The Guest List by Lucy Foley
34. A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam
35. Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak
36. Second Place by Rachel Cusk
37. An Island by Karen Jennings
38. Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford
39. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead
40. Bewilderment by Richard Powers

Another from the shortlist: the narrator, an astrobiologist, is a widower whose wife was an animal activist and whose young son has behavioural problems. I liked the writing a lot, but the themes seemed a little muddled to me: climate change, activism, right wing populism, and personal loss interwoven with two types of science fiction. That said, much of this is our reality now, I suppose, and it is an absorbing read.
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#225  Postby don't get me started » Nov 03, 2021 11:41 pm

1. Pragmatic Meaning and Cognition – Sophia S.A. Marmaridou
2. Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany and Japan - Randall Hansen
3. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics – René Dirven and Marjolijn Verspoor (Eds.)
4. Age of Static: How TV Explains Modern Britain – Phil Harrison
5. The Secret of Our Success: How Culture is Driving Human Evolution, Domesticating our Species and Making us Smarter – Joseph Henrich
6. Heroic Failure and the British - Stephanie Barczewski
7. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain - Maryanne Wolf
8. Language Soup: A Taste of How Diverse People Around the World Communicate - Kathryn A. T. Knox
9. A Place for everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical order – Judith Flanders
10. Contrastive Analysis - Carl James
11. Impossible Languages- Andrea Moro
12. Languages in the World: How History, Culture and Politics Shape Language – Jukie tetel Andresen and Phillip M. Carter
13. HHhH - Laurent Binet (Translated from the French by Sam Taylor)
14. Impoliteness: Using Language to Cause Offense – Jonathan Culpeper
15. Ethosyntax: Explorations in Grammar and Culture – N. J. Enfield (Ed.)
16. Second Language Speech Fluency: From Research to Practice – Parvaneh Tavakoli & Clare Wright.
17. At Day's Close: Night in Times Past – A. Roger Ekirch
18. Language Shock: Understanding the Culture of Conversation – Michael Agar
19. Possessives in English: An Exploration in Cognitive Grammar - John R. Taylor
20. I saw the Dog: How Language Works – Alexandra Aikhenvald.
21. The German War: A Nation under Arms, 1939 – 1945 – Nicholas Stargardt
22. Civilizations – Laurent Binet
23. Adjective Classes: A Cross-linguistic Typology - R. M. W. Dixon & A. Aikhenvald (Eds.)
24. Linguistic Diversity in Space and Time – Johanna Nichols
25. How to behave badly in Elizabethan England - Ruth Goodman
26. In the Land of Invented Languages: Adventures in Linguistic Creativity, Madness and Genius – Arika Okrent
27. Foundation – Isaac Asimov
28. One Man and his Bike – Mike Carter
29. The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps – Edwards Brooke Hitching
30. Operation Mincemeat – Ben Macintyre
31. L2 interactional competence and development - J.K. Hall, J. Hellermann & S.P. Doehler, (Eds.)
32. A Natural History of negation – Laurence R. Horn
33. Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers – Mary Roach
34. Highly Irregular: Why Tough, Through, and Dough Don't RhymeAnd Other Oddities of the English Language – Arika Okrent
35. What Language Is: And What It Isn't and What It Could Be - John McWhorter
36. Inner Speech: new Voices Peter Langland-Hassan & Agustín Vicente (Eds.)

37. The Painted Bird – Jerzy Kosinski

234 pp.

This is a novel describing the wanderings of an unnamed boy in an unnamed country in Eastern Europe in World War two. Sent to the countryside by his parents for safety, he finds himself in a deeply rural part of this country (understood to be Poland). The old woman who has taken him in soon dies and thus begins his wanderings.

The area is backwards and undeveloped. The medieval levels of poverty and deprivation are matched only by the medieval levels of superstition and ignorance. Hated wherever he goes the boy is persecuted, beaten, pursued and harassed at every turn. Drunken peasants delight in setting their dogs on him, village boys give chase, old crones spit at him to ward off the evil eye of the ‘gypsy bastard’.

Occasionally given shelter by some other outcast and surviving run ins with partisans the occupying Germans he somehow survives, living by his wits and constantly in the presence of death. The final orgy of bloodshed and destruction carried out by retreating German auxiliaries is described in graphic detail and accords with non-fiction accounts I have read. The arrival of the Red Army brings some kind of release, but after his years of desperation our hero is a wild and savage creature. His reintegration into normal life and his reunion with his parents does not go smoothly and the violence, depravity, thievery and deceit that shaped his wartime years are not so easily dispelled from his world view.

Although fictional, the author hints at autobiographical elements. It turns out that he and his family (Polish Jews) were given shelter by sympathetic Poles during the war. When first published in 1965 the book was roundly condemned by the Polish authorities, giving as it does, a very unflattering picture of life in rural Poland, the Catholic church, and the Red Army. The ban on the book in Poland was only lifted after the fall of communism.

Not a light or easy read. The best comparison I can make is to Cormack McCarthy’s ‘The Road’ in its sense of unending bleakness and the nature of a society forced by the dictates of pure survival into a total moral collapse.

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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#226  Postby NamelessFaceless » Nov 05, 2021 1:20 pm

Audiobooks in Italics

1. Lying Next To Me - Gregg Olsen
2. I Can't Make This Up - Kevin Hart
3. Beloved - Toni Morrison
4. In Our Time - Ernest Hemingway
5. Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf
6. Hollywood - Charles Bukowski
7. The Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka
8. A Simple Favor - Darcey Bell
9. David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
10. The Sorrows of Young Werther - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

11. The Hunchback of Notre Dame - Victor Hugo
12. Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Dafoe
13. Swann's Way - Marcel Proust
14. Fear of Flying - Erica Jong
15. The Wave - Todd Strasser
16. Kidnapped - Robert Louis Stevenson
17. This Side of Paradise - F. Scott Fitzgerald
18. The Piazza Tales - Herman Melville
19. Unspeakable Things - Jess Lourey
20. The Memoir of Thomas Jefferson - Thomas Jefferson
21. There is Confusion - Jessie Redmon Fauset
22. Mob Rule in New Orleans - Ida B. Wells-Barnett
23. The House Behind the Cedars - Charles W. Chesnutt

24. All the King's Men - Robert Penn Warren
25. Cleo McDougal Regrets Nothing - Allison Winn Scotch
26. The Conjure Woman - Charles W. Chesnutt
27. Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
28. The Fire in the Flint - Walter Francis White
29. Ethan Frome - Edith Wharton
30. Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. Heidi - Johanna Spyri
32. We Have Always Lived In the Castle - Shirley Jackson
33. The Red House Mystery - A.A. Milne
34. War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence - Ronan Farrow
35. Little Men - Louisa May Alcott
36. Capital Gaines - The Smart Things I've Learned Doing Stupid Stuff - Chip Gaines

37. The Prophet - Kahlil Gibran
38. The Scarlet Letter - Nathaniel Hawthorne

39. The Invisible Man - H.G. Wells
40. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Baroness Emmuska Orczy

41. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin - Erik Larson
42. Anne of Green Gables - L.M. Montgomery
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#227  Postby Blip » Nov 06, 2021 5:08 pm

1. The Calcutta Chromosome by Amitav Ghosh
2. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
3. Thrush Green by Miss Read
4. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
5. Winter in Thrush Green by Miss Read
The Shortest Day by Colm Tóibín
6. The Binding by Bridget Collins
7. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
8. The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu translated by Joel Martinsen
9. Death's End by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
10. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
11. The Ebony Tower by John Fowles
12. The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier translated by Robin Buss
13. Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan
14. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende
15. From a Low and Quiet Sea by Donal Ryan
16. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
17. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
18. Front Page News by Sadie Gordon Richmond
19. The Split by Sharon Bolton
20. Outline by Rachel Cusk
21. Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell
22. The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
23. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
24. The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
25. The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey
26. Battles at Thrush Green by Miss Read
27. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota
28. If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor
29. Still Life by Sarah Winman
30. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
31. Elmet by Fiona Mozley
32. Bosworth: the birth of the Tudors by Chris Skidmore
33. The Guest List by Lucy Foley
34. A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam
35. Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak
36. Second Place by Rachel Cusk
37. An Island by Karen Jennings
38. Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford
39. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead
40. Bewilderment by Richard Powers
41. The Fortune Men by Nadifa Mohamed

A chilling tale of a miscarriage of justice, causing a man to be hanged for a murder he did not commit. It took me a while to get into it, and I would have liked more sense of place for Cardiff's Tiger Bay in the 1950s, but it's a compelling read.
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#228  Postby Blip » Nov 09, 2021 9:41 am

1. The Calcutta Chromosome by Amitav Ghosh
2. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
3. Thrush Green by Miss Read
4. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
5. Winter in Thrush Green by Miss Read
The Shortest Day by Colm Tóibín
6. The Binding by Bridget Collins
7. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
8. The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu translated by Joel Martinsen
9. Death's End by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
10. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
11. The Ebony Tower by John Fowles
12. The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier translated by Robin Buss
13. Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan
14. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende
15. From a Low and Quiet Sea by Donal Ryan
16. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
17. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
18. Front Page News by Sadie Gordon Richmond
19. The Split by Sharon Bolton
20. Outline by Rachel Cusk
21. Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell
22. The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
23. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
24. The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
25. The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey
26. Battles at Thrush Green by Miss Read
27. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota
28. If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor
29. Still Life by Sarah Winman
30. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
31. Elmet by Fiona Mozley
32. Bosworth: the birth of the Tudors by Chris Skidmore
33. The Guest List by Lucy Foley
34. A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam
35. Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak
36. Second Place by Rachel Cusk
37. An Island by Karen Jennings
38. Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford
39. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead
40. Bewilderment by Richard Powers
41. The Fortune Men by Nadifa Mohamed
42. No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood

The interaction of life and the Twitterverse, in political and personal spheres. There's a genuinely poignant account of the short life of a baby born with fatal birth defects in the second section, but the first part did little for me beyond the observation that right wing populists exploit social media and I couldn't get to grips with the style.
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#229  Postby NamelessFaceless » Nov 12, 2021 2:21 pm

Audiobooks in Italics

1. Lying Next To Me - Gregg Olsen
2. I Can't Make This Up - Kevin Hart
3. Beloved - Toni Morrison
4. In Our Time - Ernest Hemingway
5. Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf
6. Hollywood - Charles Bukowski
7. The Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka
8. A Simple Favor - Darcey Bell
9. David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
10. The Sorrows of Young Werther - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

11. The Hunchback of Notre Dame - Victor Hugo
12. Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Dafoe
13. Swann's Way - Marcel Proust
14. Fear of Flying - Erica Jong
15. The Wave - Todd Strasser
16. Kidnapped - Robert Louis Stevenson
17. This Side of Paradise - F. Scott Fitzgerald
18. The Piazza Tales - Herman Melville
19. Unspeakable Things - Jess Lourey
20. The Memoir of Thomas Jefferson - Thomas Jefferson
21. There is Confusion - Jessie Redmon Fauset
22. Mob Rule in New Orleans - Ida B. Wells-Barnett
23. The House Behind the Cedars - Charles W. Chesnutt

24. All the King's Men - Robert Penn Warren
25. Cleo McDougal Regrets Nothing - Allison Winn Scotch
26. The Conjure Woman - Charles W. Chesnutt
27. Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
28. The Fire in the Flint - Walter Francis White
29. Ethan Frome - Edith Wharton
30. Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. Heidi - Johanna Spyri
32. We Have Always Lived In the Castle - Shirley Jackson
33. The Red House Mystery - A.A. Milne
34. War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence - Ronan Farrow
35. Little Men - Louisa May Alcott
36. Capital Gaines - The Smart Things I've Learned Doing Stupid Stuff - Chip Gaines

37. The Prophet - Kahlil Gibran
38. The Scarlet Letter - Nathaniel Hawthorne

39. The Invisible Man - H.G. Wells
40. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Baroness Emmuska Orczy

41. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin - Erik Larson
42. Anne of Green Gables - L.M. Montgomery
43. The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True - Richard Dawkins
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#230  Postby Blip » Nov 15, 2021 9:31 am

1. The Calcutta Chromosome by Amitav Ghosh
2. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
3. Thrush Green by Miss Read
4. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
5. Winter in Thrush Green by Miss Read
The Shortest Day by Colm Tóibín
6. The Binding by Bridget Collins
7. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
8. The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu translated by Joel Martinsen
9. Death's End by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
10. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
11. The Ebony Tower by John Fowles
12. The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier translated by Robin Buss
13. Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan
14. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende
15. From a Low and Quiet Sea by Donal Ryan
16. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
17. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
18. Front Page News by Sadie Gordon Richmond
19. The Split by Sharon Bolton
20. Outline by Rachel Cusk
21. Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell
22. The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
23. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
24. The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
25. The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey
26. Battles at Thrush Green by Miss Read
27. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota
28. If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor
29. Still Life by Sarah Winman
30. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
31. Elmet by Fiona Mozley
32. Bosworth: the birth of the Tudors by Chris Skidmore
33. The Guest List by Lucy Foley
34. A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam
35. Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak
36. Second Place by Rachel Cusk
37. An Island by Karen Jennings
38. Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford
39. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead
40. Bewilderment by Richard Powers
41. The Fortune Men by Nadifa Mohamed
42. No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood
43. The Promise by Damon Galgut

A worthy winner: I gather the judges were unanimous in their decision. A white South African family navigate the end of apartheid; a promise made years before to a black servant seems not to be binding for several of them. Galgut tackles weighty themes with humour and verve; the narration is original and engaging.
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#231  Postby NamelessFaceless » Nov 16, 2021 2:55 pm

Audiobooks in Italics

1. Lying Next To Me - Gregg Olsen
2. I Can't Make This Up - Kevin Hart
3. Beloved - Toni Morrison
4. In Our Time - Ernest Hemingway
5. Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf
6. Hollywood - Charles Bukowski
7. The Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka
8. A Simple Favor - Darcey Bell
9. David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
10. The Sorrows of Young Werther - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

11. The Hunchback of Notre Dame - Victor Hugo
12. Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Dafoe
13. Swann's Way - Marcel Proust
14. Fear of Flying - Erica Jong
15. The Wave - Todd Strasser
16. Kidnapped - Robert Louis Stevenson
17. This Side of Paradise - F. Scott Fitzgerald
18. The Piazza Tales - Herman Melville
19. Unspeakable Things - Jess Lourey
20. The Memoir of Thomas Jefferson - Thomas Jefferson
21. There is Confusion - Jessie Redmon Fauset
22. Mob Rule in New Orleans - Ida B. Wells-Barnett
23. The House Behind the Cedars - Charles W. Chesnutt

24. All the King's Men - Robert Penn Warren
25. Cleo McDougal Regrets Nothing - Allison Winn Scotch
26. The Conjure Woman - Charles W. Chesnutt
27. Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
28. The Fire in the Flint - Walter Francis White
29. Ethan Frome - Edith Wharton
30. Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
31. Heidi - Johanna Spyri
32. We Have Always Lived In the Castle - Shirley Jackson
33. The Red House Mystery - A.A. Milne
34. War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence - Ronan Farrow
35. Little Men - Louisa May Alcott
36. Capital Gaines - The Smart Things I've Learned Doing Stupid Stuff - Chip Gaines

37. The Prophet - Kahlil Gibran
38. The Scarlet Letter - Nathaniel Hawthorne

39. The Invisible Man - H.G. Wells
40. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Baroness Emmuska Orczy

41. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin - Erik Larson
42. Anne of Green Gables - L.M. Montgomery
43. The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True - Richard Dawkins
44. Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
45. Appointment in Samarra - John O'Hara
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#232  Postby Blip » Nov 22, 2021 1:00 pm

1. The Calcutta Chromosome by Amitav Ghosh
2. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
3. Thrush Green by Miss Read
4. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
5. Winter in Thrush Green by Miss Read
The Shortest Day by Colm Tóibín
6. The Binding by Bridget Collins
7. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
8. The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu translated by Joel Martinsen
9. Death's End by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
10. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
11. The Ebony Tower by John Fowles
12. The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier translated by Robin Buss
13. Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan
14. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende
15. From a Low and Quiet Sea by Donal Ryan
16. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
17. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
18. Front Page News by Sadie Gordon Richmond
19. The Split by Sharon Bolton
20. Outline by Rachel Cusk
21. Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell
22. The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
23. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
24. The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
25. The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey
26. Battles at Thrush Green by Miss Read
27. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota
28. If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor
29. Still Life by Sarah Winman
30. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
31. Elmet by Fiona Mozley
32. Bosworth: the birth of the Tudors by Chris Skidmore
33. The Guest List by Lucy Foley
34. A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam
35. Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak
36. Second Place by Rachel Cusk
37. An Island by Karen Jennings
38. Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford
39. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead
40. Bewilderment by Richard Powers
41. The Fortune Men by Nadifa Mohamed
42. No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood
43. The Promise by Damon Galgut
44. The Magician by Colm Tóibín

This fictionalised biography of Thomas Mann focuses mostly on his family life in the context of the major world events that were unfolding at the time: the First World War, the rise of Hitler, the Second World War, the partition of Germany and the Cold War.

In this it is very good indeed although you may find yourself reflecting that the novel does not have much to say about Mann's work, and therefore the basis of his reputation and success.
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#233  Postby UncertainSloth » Nov 22, 2021 8:20 pm

1. james brogden - the narrows - 8/10
2. nora roberts - of blood and bone - 8/10
3. nora roberts - the rise of magicks - 8/10
4. karen thompsn walker - the dreamers - 7/10
5. sophie draper - cuckoo - 7/10
6. laura carlin - the wicked cometh - 7/10
7. vikram palakar - the night theatre - 7/10
8. m r carey - the trials of koli - 9/10
9. bridget collins - the binding - 9/10
10. jac jemc - the grip of it - 7/10
11. carolyn jess-cooke - the boy who could see demons - 9/10
12. daisy johnson - everything under - 7/10
13. paraic o'donnell - house on vesper sands - 7/10
14. claire north - the gameshouse - 8/10 -
15. martin edwards - the coffin trail - 6/10
16. laird hunt - neverhome - 8/10
17. jesmyn ward - sing, unburied, sing - 8/10
18. edward parnell - ghostland: in search of a haunted country - 10/10
19. james brogden - the plague stones - 8/10
20. jonathan coe - the dwarves of death - 7/10
21. catherine burns - the visitors - 8/10
22. jonathan coe - the accidental woman - 6/10
23. gemma files - we will all go down together - 10/10
24. christopher ransom - the people next door - 6/10
25. andrew pyper - the killing circle - 9/10
26. alma katsu - the hunger - 9/10
27. jess kidd - himself - 9/10
28. andrew pyper - the only child - 8/10
29. scarlett thomas - our tragic universe - 9/10
30. melissa bailey - the medici mirror - 7/10
31. joe hill - nos4r2 - 8/10 - i dropped a point at the beginning for such a clunky title but i enjoyed hill's 'the fireman' and this is good as well - can't say the apple has fallen far from the tree ideas-wise but i think a fair bit of it may be more to do with the fact tabitha proof-reads both their works and makes suggestions as well

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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#234  Postby Blip » Nov 28, 2021 8:49 am

1. The Calcutta Chromosome by Amitav Ghosh
2. The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro
3. Thrush Green by Miss Read
4. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
5. Winter in Thrush Green by Miss Read
The Shortest Day by Colm Tóibín
6. The Binding by Bridget Collins
7. The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
8. The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu translated by Joel Martinsen
9. Death's End by Cixin Liu translated by Ken Liu
10. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
11. The Ebony Tower by John Fowles
12. The Lost Estate (Le Grand Meaulnes) by Henri Alain-Fournier translated by Robin Buss
13. Strange Flowers by Donal Ryan
14. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende
15. From a Low and Quiet Sea by Donal Ryan
16. Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende translated by Margaret Sayers Peden
17. Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
18. Front Page News by Sadie Gordon Richmond
19. The Split by Sharon Bolton
20. Outline by Rachel Cusk
21. Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell
22. The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota
23. Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor
24. The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
25. The Satapur Moonstone by Sujata Massey
26. Battles at Thrush Green by Miss Read
27. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota
28. If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor
29. Still Life by Sarah Winman
30. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
31. Elmet by Fiona Mozley
32. Bosworth: the birth of the Tudors by Chris Skidmore
33. The Guest List by Lucy Foley
34. A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam
35. Three Daughters of Eve by Elif Shafak
36. Second Place by Rachel Cusk
37. An Island by Karen Jennings
38. Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford
39. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead
40. Bewilderment by Richard Powers
41. The Fortune Men by Nadifa Mohamed
42. No One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood
43. The Promise by Damon Galgut
44. The Magician by Colm Tóibín
45. Songs in Ursa Major by Emma Brodie
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Re: The Book Thread 2021

#235  Postby don't get me started » Dec 02, 2021 12:53 am

2021 book 38

1. Pragmatic Meaning and Cognition – Sophia S.A. Marmaridou
2. Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany and Japan - Randall Hansen
3. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics – René Dirven and Marjolijn Verspoor (Eds.)
4. Age of Static: How TV Explains Modern Britain – Phil Harrison
5. The Secret of Our Success: How Culture is Driving Human Evolution, Domesticating our Species and Making us Smarter – Joseph Henrich
6. Heroic Failure and the British - Stephanie Barczewski
7. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain - Maryanne Wolf
8. Language Soup: A Taste of How Diverse People Around the World Communicate - Kathryn A. T. Knox
9. A Place for everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical order – Judith Flanders
10. Contrastive Analysis - Carl James
11. Impossible Languages- Andrea Moro
12. Languages in the World: How History, Culture and Politics Shape Language – Jukie tetel Andresen and Phillip M. Carter
13. HHhH - Laurent Binet (Translated from the French by Sam Taylor)
14. Impoliteness: Using Language to Cause Offense – Jonathan Culpeper
15. Ethosyntax: Explorations in Grammar and Culture – N. J. Enfield (Ed.)
16. Second Language Speech Fluency: From Research to Practice – Parvaneh Tavakoli & Clare Wright.
17. At Day's Close: Night in Times Past – A. Roger Ekirch
18. Language Shock: Understanding the Culture of Conversation – Michael Agar
19. Possessives in English: An Exploration in Cognitive Grammar - John R. Taylor
20. I saw the Dog: How Language Works – Alexandra Aikhenvald.
21. The German War: A Nation under Arms, 1939 – 1945 – Nicholas Stargardt
22. Civilizations – Laurent Binet
23. Adjective Classes: A Cross-linguistic Typology - R. M. W. Dixon & A. Aikhenvald (Eds.)
24. Linguistic Diversity in Space and Time – Johanna Nichols
25. How to behave badly in Elizabethan England - Ruth Goodman
26. In the Land of Invented Languages: Adventures in Linguistic Creativity, Madness and Genius – Arika Okrent
27. Foundation – Isaac Asimov
28. One Man and his Bike – Mike Carter
29. The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps – Edwards Brooke Hitching
30. Operation Mincemeat – Ben Macintyre
31. L2 interactional competence and development - J.K. Hall, J. Hellermann & S.P. Doehler, (Eds.)
32. A Natural History of negation – Laurence R. Horn
33. Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers – Mary Roach
34. Highly Irregular: Why Tough, Through, and Dough Don't RhymeAnd Other Oddities of the English Language – Arika Okrent
35. What Language Is: And What It Isn't and What It Could Be - John McWhorter
36. Inner Speech: new Voices Peter Langland-Hassan & Agustín Vicente (Eds.)

37. The Painted Bird – Jerzy Kosinski
38. Interactional Linguistics: Studying Language in Social Interaction – Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen & Margaret Selting

632.pp

Well, it looks like I won’t be reaching 50 books this year, but I’m okay with that. This book was a real treasure trove and I really took my time, reading and re-reading several sections to get the maximum uptake. In addition, I also took time off reading the actual book to chase down papers and book chapters from the very extensive reference list. (I actually sat down when I had finished and read the reference list from beginning to end, marking sources that I wanted to read.)

So, what is the book about? As the title suggests, this is a view of language based not on the intuition of the researcher and an analysis of concocted ‘John and Mary’ sentences. (This is the ‘methodology’ of linguistics at the Chomsky end of the spectrum.) Rather, the authors base their analyses on real data. Minutely detailed transcripts of mundane social interactions are the starting point. The micro-analysis of these data, looking at every pause, hesitation, repetition, overlap, pitch and volume shift (among other phenomena) reveals that mundane spoken interaction is orderly and systematic in ways that are largely beyond the intuition of speakers and not available to casual introspection. Participants in talk-in-interaction are keenly aware of the kinds of discourse they are involved in and construct their turns in a delicate manner to be both responsive to the previous turn at talk and also to adumbrate what kind of turn will be expected in response to the current turn. Because talk happens in real time and is irreversible, participants must attend to the universal turn- taking procedures to ensure that progressivity is maintained. During talk there are frequent troubles in speaking, hearing and understanding, and participants must have at their disposal robust and identifiable means of carrying out repair of these trouble sources. It turns out that these repair practices (self- or other- initiated and self- or other completed) are more or less universal across languages – give or take a little local calibration.

(One of the) strength(s) of this book is the cross-linguistic support for the theories advanced by conversation analysists. Data from English is prominent, but the authors make ample reference to data from a wide variety of other languages. For example, English and German are what is termed ‘early projection’ languages. That is, the shape of a turn at talk, and it’s likely ending point emerges fairly early in the turn, allowing other participants to predict when turn transition is upcoming and thus prepare their own next turn so that they can achieve precision timing (‘no gap, no overlap’). By contrast, Japanese is a late projection language (being as it is a verb final language.) This means that turn shape is a lot less predictable. This accounts for the large number of turn final particles in that language which perform a variety of marking and epistemic status functions and also help listeners to identify upcoming turn transition.

The authors also pay close attention to the prosody of daily conversation. For example, English has what is termed a ‘change of state token’ – the word ‘Oh’ and despite its minuscule size, this word fulfills a number of very important interactional functions. The functions are often differentiated by the prosody. (Think of how many different ways you can pronounce this word to convey surprise, agreement, epistemic convergence, just come to mind relevant facts etc.) Other languages have a number of different words to cover various sub-functions covered by the single English word. (The authors mention German ‘Ach so’ and Japanese ‘Ahhh, sou’, among change of state tokens in numerous other languages.)

So, all in all a very satisfying read. Even though this is my research field and a lot of the underlying methodology and ideology were familiar to me, there was still a wealth of new material and excellent examples from the literature. Got through a few packs of post-its in annotating this volume and it will remain close at hand as a vital resource in my own research and writing.

(* Extra bonus, despite the highly academic theme, the writing style was crisp and accessible. Not something that can be said for all of the papers and books in the field.)

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