The Book Thread 2022

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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#181  Postby don't get me started » May 17, 2022 3:29 am

1. Cognitive Discourse Analysis: An introduction - Thora Tenbrink
2. Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything About Race, Gender And Identity- And Why This Harms Everybody – Helen Pluckrose and James Lindsay
3. A History of the World in 12 Maps – Jerry Brotton
4. Origins of the Specious: Myths and Misconceptions of the English Language – Patricia T. O’Connor & Stewart Kellerman
5. Peer Interaction and Second Language Learning - Jenefer Philip, Rebecca Adams & Noriko Iwashita
6. Eugene Onegin - Alexander Pushkin
7. Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World - Nataly Kelly & Jost Zetzche
8. English Words: A Linguistic Introduction - Heidi Harley
9. Questions: Formal, Functional and Interactional Perspectives Jan P. de Ruiter (Ed.)
10. Persepolis Rising - James S.A. Corey
11. English Prepositions: Their meanings and uses - R.M.W. Dixon
12. Draußen vor der Tür - Wolfgang Borchert
13. Metonymy: Hidden Shortcuts in Language, Thought and Communication - Jeannette Liitlemore
14. Tiamat's Wrath - James S.A. Corey
15. Leviathan Falls - James S.A. Corey
16. The Horse, the Wheel and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World - David W. Anthony

17. The Unfortunate Traveler and Other Works - Thomas Nashe

501 pp.

Had this on my radar for a long time and have been picking away at it bit by bit for a while. A contemporary of Shakespeare, these works are written in that particular and ornate Elizabethan style, replete with many Latin quotations. The narratives veer from mockery of religious sects, to derision of the pretenses of scholars, to the contumely of foreigners, the iniquity of harlots and courtesans and much more. Bawdy, learned, suffused with slang and humor - a rollicking read. The world of the Elizabethans seems simultaneously close at hand and utterly alien.

(I have, in all good faith, to tell you my lords, that I have not been so diligent in my literary endeavor - certain passages, to my shame, have remained unread, for the volume is excessive full, tho' no disrespect should accrue to Mr Nashe;
I'faith it is my own laggardly and poor intellect, which betokens much want of proper instruction, that holds the blame - the blame being doubled for one such as myself who is wont to play the pedagogue.)

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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#182  Postby Macdoc » May 17, 2022 11:43 am

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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#183  Postby Evolving » May 17, 2022 1:59 pm

dgms: my god, what on earth is that picture on the front cover? That is seriously gruesome.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#184  Postby don't get me started » May 18, 2022 1:13 am

Evolving wrote:dgms: my god, what on earth is that picture on the front cover? That is seriously gruesome.


The blurb on the back says that it is a detail from 'Les Grandes Misères de la Guerre' by Jacques Caliot in the British Museum.

Yes, it is quite grim.
This is part of what I meant when I mentioned that the Elizabethan world is both familiar and alien to us. At some point in the 'Unfortunate Traveler' the hero describes meeting Erasmus and attending an evening of scholarly debate. Then, a few pages later, he is discoursing in graphic detail on some miscreant being broken on the wheel.

What seems to us like the pure barbarism and base cruelty, in the modern world restricted to the domain of religious lunatics like ISIS or the South American drug cartels, was, at that time viewed as the proper administration of justice combined with public entertainment.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#185  Postby Kaleid » May 18, 2022 3:02 pm

That specific Elizabethan style you describe puts me off a bit, but the subjects seem very (morbidly) interesting. I'll check out a preview.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#186  Postby Blip » May 19, 2022 8:14 am

1. A Town Called Solace by Mary Lawson
2. The Expectation Effect by David Robson
3. Crow Lake by Mary Lawson
4. Road Ends by Mary Lawson
5. A Brief History of Earth by Andrew H Knoll
6. Roseanna by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Lois Roth
7. The Man Who Went Up in Smoke by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
8. The Other Side of the Bridge by Mary Lawson
9. The Man on the Balcony by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Alan Blair
10. Rachel's Holiday by Marian Keyes
11. The Laughing Policeman by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Alan Blair
12. Monsieur Ka by Vesna Goldsworthy
13. The Fire Engine That Disappeared by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
14. Gorski by Vesna Goldsworthy
15. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz
16. Murder at the Savoy by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
17. The Abominable Man by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
18. The Forty Rules of Love by Elif Shafak
19. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl part translated by Ilse Lasch
20. The Locked Room by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Paul Britten Austin
21. Cop Killer by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Thomas Teal
22. The Wings of the Dove by Henry James
23. The Terrorists by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
24. The Other Name: Septology I-II by Jon Fosse translated by Damion Searls

The third in this series has just been listed for the International Booker, so I thought I'd try the first. The ideas about identity and the different potential paths a life can take do interest me but the style, stream-of-consciousness with no full stops, is really offputting. I feel I should persist with the series though.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#187  Postby NamelessFaceless » May 19, 2022 1:28 pm

Audiobooks in Italics

1. Hope of Heaven - John O'Hara
2. Pal Joey - John O'Hara
3. Invitation to a Beheading - Vladimir Nabokov
4. Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever - Bill O'Reilly
5. Haroun and the Sea of Stories - Salman Rushdie
6. Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
7. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd - Agatha Christie
8. The Innocence of Father Brown - G.K. Chesterton
9. The Lost World - Arthur Conan Doyle
10 The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
11. The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway

12. A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
13. The Idiot - Fyodor Dostoevsky
14. A Study in Scarlet - Arthur Conan Doyle

15. Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert (a re-read, this time listened)
16. Around the World in Eighty Days - Jules Vernes (I was really surprised at how much I enjoyed this!)
17. Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte (another re-read, this time listened)

18. The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde (another one I previously read and have now listened)
19. Treasure Island - Robert Louis Stevenson
20. The Greatest Show on Earth - Richard Dawkins
21. The Forward Collection: The Last Conversation (Paul Tremblay); Emergency Skin (N.K. Jemisin); Summer Frost (Blake Crouch); Ark (Veronica Roth); Randomize (Andy Weir); You Have Arrived at Your Destination (Amor Towles)
22. Beyond Good and Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche :yuk:
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#188  Postby don't get me started » May 22, 2022 10:01 am

1. Cognitive Discourse Analysis: An introduction - Thora Tenbrink
2. Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything About Race, Gender And Identity- And Why This Harms Everybody – Helen Pluckrose and James Lindsay
3. A History of the World in 12 Maps – Jerry Brotton
4. Origins of the Specious: Myths and Misconceptions of the English Language – Patricia T. O’Connor & Stewart Kellerman
5. Peer Interaction and Second Language Learning - Jenefer Philip, Rebecca Adams & Noriko Iwashita
6. Eugene Onegin - Alexander Pushkin
7. Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World - Nataly Kelly & Jost Zetzche
8. English Words: A Linguistic Introduction - Heidi Harley
9. Questions: Formal, Functional and Interactional Perspectives Jan P. de Ruiter (Ed.)
10. Persepolis Rising - James S.A. Corey
11. English Prepositions: Their meanings and uses - R.M.W. Dixon
12. Draußen vor der Tür - Wolfgang Borchert
13. Metonymy: Hidden Shortcuts in Language, Thought and Communication - Jeannette Liitlemore
14. Tiamat's Wrath - James S.A. Corey
15. Leviathan Falls - James S.A. Corey
16. The Horse, the Wheel and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World - David W. Anthony
17. The Unfortunate Traveler and Other Works - Thomas Nashe

18. A A Qualitative Approach to the Validation of Oral Language Tests (Studies in Language Testing, Series Number 14) - Anne Lazarton

223. pp

Although a little bit old now (pub.2002), this book is an interesting take on the business of how we can measure the language proficiency of second/foreign language learners. The author argues for a qualitative rather than a quantitive approach, using the methodology of conversation analysis. This methodology is focused on collecting raw data of unscripted, unrehearsed spoken interactions and transcribing them to a very high degree of detail.

The view of CA is that questions of grammar and lexis do not constitute the base line of language proficiency. The highly detailed transcripts produced by CA reveal that people simply do not speak in a way that matches the standards of the written form of the language. (Which leads us to the moral question: Is it right that language teachers and testers hold up a model of language that native speakers of that language do not adhere to? I believe not).

Spoken interaction is locally managed by the participants themselves, and meanings are jointly constructed by the participants for the participants, such meanings being emergent at that time, in that place and with those participants. Spoken language is characterized by robust and identifiable systems of turn-taking, means for the identification and repair of trouble sources, judicious deployment of backchannels and response tokens, nuanced use of discourse markers and much more. Learners who can demonstrate orientation to these interactional resources may be scored down on more traditional language tests- the emphasis often falling on the learner producing on-demand utterances that are ‘correct’ by some narrow lexico-grammatical criteria. (I’m looking at you the formal Japanese language education…)

I teach CA methodology as a specialized content course, and I use it CA as a base for my actual language teaching. This book was very much preaching to the converted with this reader, but a nice overview of how CA can be applied.

As I always tell my new students at the beginning of the new semester. The question in language after language is ‘Do you SPEAK English? PARLEZ-vous français? SPRECHEN sie Deutsch?, Говорите ли вы по-русски? and so on. And when we say ‘speak’ we really mean ‘interact’. When we test language learners, we should certainly be testing their ability to interact.

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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#189  Postby Blip » May 24, 2022 8:00 am

1. A Town Called Solace by Mary Lawson
2. The Expectation Effect by David Robson
3. Crow Lake by Mary Lawson
4. Road Ends by Mary Lawson
5. A Brief History of Earth by Andrew H Knoll
6. Roseanna by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Lois Roth
7. The Man Who Went Up in Smoke by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
8. The Other Side of the Bridge by Mary Lawson
9. The Man on the Balcony by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Alan Blair
10. Rachel's Holiday by Marian Keyes
11. The Laughing Policeman by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Alan Blair
12. Monsieur Ka by Vesna Goldsworthy
13. The Fire Engine That Disappeared by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
14. Gorski by Vesna Goldsworthy
15. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz
16. Murder at the Savoy by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
17. The Abominable Man by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
18. The Forty Rules of Love by Elif Shafak
19. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl part translated by Ilse Lasch
20. The Locked Room by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Paul Britten Austin
21. Cop Killer by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Thomas Teal
22. The Wings of the Dove by Henry James
23. The Terrorists by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
24. The Other Name: Septology I-II by Jon Fosse translated by Damion Searls
25. I Is Another: Septology III-V by Jon Fosse translated by Damion Searls

It's such an interesting idea that I'm persisting despite the writing technique.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#190  Postby NamelessFaceless » May 24, 2022 2:22 pm

Audiobooks in Italics

1. Hope of Heaven - John O'Hara
2. Pal Joey - John O'Hara
3. Invitation to a Beheading - Vladimir Nabokov
4. Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever - Bill O'Reilly
5. Haroun and the Sea of Stories - Salman Rushdie
6. Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
7. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd - Agatha Christie
8. The Innocence of Father Brown - G.K. Chesterton
9. The Lost World - Arthur Conan Doyle
10 The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle
11. The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway

12. A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
13. The Idiot - Fyodor Dostoevsky
14. A Study in Scarlet - Arthur Conan Doyle

15. Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert (a re-read, this time listened)
16. Around the World in Eighty Days - Jules Vernes (I was really surprised at how much I enjoyed this!)
17. Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte (another re-read, this time listened)

18. The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde (another one I previously read and have now listened)
19. Treasure Island - Robert Louis Stevenson
20. The Greatest Show on Earth - Richard Dawkins
21. The Forward Collection: The Last Conversation (Paul Tremblay); Emergency Skin (N.K. Jemisin); Summer Frost (Blake Crouch); Ark (Veronica Roth); Randomize (Andy Weir); You Have Arrived at Your Destination (Amor Towles)
22. Beyond Good and Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche
23. Sarah - J.T. LeRoy
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#191  Postby Kaleid » May 25, 2022 7:03 pm

1. The Five - Hallie Rubenhold
2. The Time Traveller's Guide to Regency Britain - Ian Mortimer
3. War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
4. The Golden Strangers - Henry Treece
5. White - Marie Darrieussecq
6. Villette - Charlotte Brontë
7. The Dark Island - Henry Treece
8. Fat Chance - Simon Gray
9. The Expedition of Humphry Clinker - Tobias Smollett
10. Red Queen, White Queen - Henry Treece

11. Moby-Dick - Herman Melville

I always gear myself up to be slightly disappointed when I tackle 'classics' that I haven't got round to. When I read Treasure Island I identified all the piratical stereotypes that it birthed, but I didn't find it a gripping read. Moby-Dick has the fantastical story but I found it too metaphorical and meandering for its own good. A hard read.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#192  Postby Blip » May 26, 2022 8:08 am

I see a cake. Happy Birthday, UncertainSloth!
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#193  Postby don't get me started » May 26, 2022 1:35 pm

Yes indeed. many happy returns of the day, you book challenge stalwart, you!
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#194  Postby UncertainSloth » May 26, 2022 3:27 pm

Blip wrote:I see a cake. Happy Birthday, UncertainSloth!



whay thank you, kind blip - yes indeed, my 49th...currently resisting the urge to buy more books with some birthday money when i still have a massive backlog... :grin:


don't get me started wrote:Yes indeed. many happy returns of the day, you book challenge stalwart, you!


thank you kindly, good sir :cheers:
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#195  Postby don't get me started » May 26, 2022 11:41 pm

UncertainSloth wrote:

currently resisting the urge to buy more books with some birthday money when i still have a massive backlog... :grin:


Nah, buy those books mate.
You'd be in good company....

“When I have a little money, I buy books; and if I have any left, I buy food and clothes.” - Erasmus.

On a semi-serious note, books are the only items I have any kind of acquisitive feelings about. I'm not interested in high-end goods, designer brands or any other such things. Don't want a Rolex or a Ferrari or a 10,000 dollar suit or any of the other paraphernalia of so-called 'success'. I don't have any expensive hobbies like golf or scuba diving. I don't spend my money on premium concert tickets, season ticket for big sporting clubs, attending formula 1 races or anything like that. I have no interest in eating at Michelin starred restaurants or spending huge sums on bottles of vintage wine, or expensive champagne. Yachts, helicopters, country estates do not interest me in the slightest- even if I could afford them.

But books...yeah. (And not some leather bound and signed first edition, or any other 'value adding' bullshit. A tattered old paperback will do the trick. The value of a book are the contents...)

Having a backlog of books that you intend to get round to is a fine thing, in my estimation.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#196  Postby Blip » May 27, 2022 8:12 am

1. A Town Called Solace by Mary Lawson
2. The Expectation Effect by David Robson
3. Crow Lake by Mary Lawson
4. Road Ends by Mary Lawson
5. A Brief History of Earth by Andrew H Knoll
6. Roseanna by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Lois Roth
7. The Man Who Went Up in Smoke by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
8. The Other Side of the Bridge by Mary Lawson
9. The Man on the Balcony by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Alan Blair
10. Rachel's Holiday by Marian Keyes
11. The Laughing Policeman by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Alan Blair
12. Monsieur Ka by Vesna Goldsworthy
13. The Fire Engine That Disappeared by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
14. Gorski by Vesna Goldsworthy
15. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz
16. Murder at the Savoy by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
17. The Abominable Man by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
18. The Forty Rules of Love by Elif Shafak
19. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl part translated by Ilse Lasch
20. The Locked Room by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Paul Britten Austin
21. Cop Killer by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Thomas Teal
22. The Wings of the Dove by Henry James
23. The Terrorists by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö translated by Joan Tate
24. The Other Name: Septology I-II by Jon Fosse translated by Damion Searls
25. I Is Another: Septology III-V by Jon Fosse translated by Damion Searls
26. A New Name: Septology VI-VII by Jon Fosse translated by Damion Searls

So, this trilogy offers genuinely original and thought-provoking ideas about the nature of self, identity and time. The protagonist coexists with his past and future selves as well as another version of himself that developed along the way, as does another character. The stream of consciousness delivery is highly convincing but, for me at least, distracting to read. Still, I've never read anything quite like this, and it undoubtedly has merit.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#197  Postby Evolving » May 27, 2022 10:48 am

Kaleid wrote:...
11. Moby-Dick - Herman Melville

I always gear myself up to be slightly disappointed when I tackle 'classics' that I haven't got round to. When I read Treasure Island I identified all the piratical stereotypes that it birthed, but I didn't find it a gripping read. Moby-Dick has the fantastical story but I found it too metaphorical and meandering for its own good. A hard read.


Agreed on Moby Dick.

I too read Treasure Island as an adult (in fact I read it because I had signed up to a pirate-themed Mafia game on this very forum - hi, Blip!). One thing that I hadn't expected, but probably should have, was the brutality and primitivity of the pirates. I thought that was rather well done.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#198  Postby UncertainSloth » May 27, 2022 10:59 am

really intrigued by that jon fosse one, blip - it seems a collection of the whole septology is coming later in the year so will pick up then
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#199  Postby Macdoc » May 28, 2022 2:36 am

Ah yes but the lyrical aspect of Moby Dick is incredible and you have to set yourself back to when it was written. Marvelous piece of literature with enduring imagery.

Black Sails is a fun retelling of Mr Silver and company.

Second science book improving my knowledge ....How we got to Now- Six Innovations that made the Modern World.

just wonderful

listening to Book 5 of Eve 14 ...a well told tale of humans and robots over millenia.
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Re: The Book Thread 2022

#200  Postby Evolving » May 28, 2022 8:42 am

Heptology. :snooty:
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