What'cha Readin'?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2341  Postby NilsGLindgren » Feb 16, 2012 2:04 pm

Nicko wrote:
DeepSpaceDreamer wrote:The Silmarillion- J.R.R. Tolkien. But I can only read parts at a time, otherwise I begin to get misty eyed and am apt to become overwhelmed with the urge to write a long, flowery poem about whatever is around me at that moment, and float around my house and hum "Concerning Hobbits", or say strange things- oh, well I do that anyway.
Many good- and bad- pieces of poetry have resulted from this.


Funny. It overwhelmed me with the urge to read something else.

Can't blame you. COmpletely lacking in comic relief. No hobbitses. Everything ends in tears while elves look nobly on. Meh.
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What'cha Readin'?

#2342  Postby Ironclad » Feb 17, 2012 10:56 pm

Are Lost Tales = Silmarillion? Same, regurgitated?
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2343  Postby j.mills » Feb 17, 2012 11:36 pm

Errr, I think yer Lost Tales are things assembled and 'embellished' for JRRT's notes and wotnot. Whereas yer Silmarillion is a finished work?
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2344  Postby smudge » Feb 18, 2012 8:17 am

Just finished Last Argument of Kings, final part of The First Law trilogy, Joe Abercrombie.
I really enjoyed the series and Mr Abercrombie goes onto my list of must read Authors.
After the relentless pace of the first two books it slowed a bit for the first half of this. The pace change was welcome as the threads tied together and the whole thing ended at breakneck speed. Many plot turns I’d seen way back, many I had not. Many characters back to the mud (dead) by the end and others awaiting a sequel I’d happily read should it appear. I think part of what I enjoyed about this is that his ‘heroes’ are not just ‘flawed’ but often totally bloody evil! But somehow, ‘heroes’ they are, and I loved and identified with them!
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2345  Postby Mazille » Feb 18, 2012 10:09 am

smudge wrote:Just finished Last Argument of Kings, final part of The First Law trilogy, Joe Abercrombie.
I really enjoyed the series and Mr Abercrombie goes onto my list of must read Authors.
After the relentless pace of the first two books it slowed a bit for the first half of this. The pace change was welcome as the threads tied together and the whole thing ended at breakneck speed. Many plot turns I’d seen way back, many I had not. Many characters back to the mud (dead) by the end and others awaiting a sequel I’d happily read should it appear. I think part of what I enjoyed about this is that his ‘heroes’ are not just ‘flawed’ but often totally bloody evil! But somehow, ‘heroes’ they are, and I loved and identified with them!

:cheers: Absolutely agree.
Just so you know, there are two sequels out already: Best Served Cold and The Heroes.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2346  Postby Fallible » Feb 18, 2012 1:33 pm

j.mills wrote:Errr, I think yer Lost Tales are things assembled and 'embellished' for JRRT's notes and wotnot. Whereas yer Silmarillion is a finished work?


Oui, c'est ca, c'est vrai. Just trying to picture what is up in my loft, there are at least 4 volumes of Lost Tales, perhaps 5, perhaps more. I haven't looked in them since my late teens/early twenties, however.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2347  Postby j.mills » Feb 18, 2012 2:22 pm

Are they growing old and mouldy while you remain startlingly youthful? :ask:
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Where one becomes many through struggle and strife,
But the Mother of Mysteries is another man's call:
Why is there something 'stead of nothing at all?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2348  Postby Fallible » Feb 18, 2012 6:29 pm

Yes, I am in fact 92. You have now sealed your fate. :coffee:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2349  Postby j.mills » Feb 18, 2012 6:54 pm

:shock: Erm. [Edges away.] :whistle:
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Where one becomes many through struggle and strife,
But the Mother of Mysteries is another man's call:
Why is there something 'stead of nothing at all?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2350  Postby smudge » Feb 18, 2012 7:02 pm

Mazille wrote:
Just so you know, there are two sequels out already: Best Served Cold and The Heroes.



Thanks Mazille! :cheers:
I was aware of those novels but unaware they were 'First Law' related! I look forward to reading them all the more now! Though I have some other stuff I want to get through first....
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2351  Postby NilsGLindgren » Feb 19, 2012 10:19 am

Fallible wrote:
j.mills wrote:Errr, I think yer Lost Tales are things assembled and 'embellished' for JRRT's notes and wotnot. Whereas yer Silmarillion is a finished work?


Oui, c'est ca, c'est vrai. Just trying to picture what is up in my loft, there are at least 4 volumes of Lost Tales, perhaps 5, perhaps more. I haven't looked in them since my late teens/early twenties, however.

Apaprently a collection of old laundry lists and receipts from the grocery store frequented by the good professor is being edited by a distant relative of the Tolkien family. A rumour that Peter Jackson has bought the movie rights is seriously unfounded.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2352  Postby j.mills » Feb 19, 2012 12:42 pm

^ To be called Hoard of the Things.

Best I could do, given what I had to work with. :dunno:
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There is grandeur in this view of life
Where one becomes many through struggle and strife,
But the Mother of Mysteries is another man's call:
Why is there something 'stead of nothing at all?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2353  Postby j.mills » Feb 19, 2012 5:47 pm

Somebody (smudge?) was interested to see how I found the Dee Brown book I was reading, Hear That Lonesome Whistle Blow: four stars:
It's the 1860s and the West is just opening up: there are gold-digging settlements in California, the odd ranching town, but essentially the huge sweep of the mid-West remains home "only" to Native Americans and buffalo. Control and settlement of this vast country urgently requires infrastructure, to enable faster, safer and higher-volume transport than can be achieved by wagon train or long shipping routes. The land is ripe for the picking when the railroad men step in, hastily throwing down thousands of miles of track and picking up, in return, enormous government subsidies and eye-popping land grants that extend tens of miles to either side of their lines.

Brown spends the first half of the book describing how the first transcontinental line was laid: the engineering challenges, the savage competition between the companies building from opposite ends, the outright disregard for native rights, and most of all the shameless swindling of the public purse by the scoundrels at the top. For bribed politicians and ruthless railway tycoons alike, the railroad was only the means to an end - not of conquering the land, but of making themselves immensely rich by scandalous financial arrangements, to which building and running railways was merely an afterthought, a minor legal hoop to jump through. Consequently the lines were poorly and rapidly built, taking routes chosen not for speed or safety but to maximise the rewards from completing the miles:
As for Dr. Durant and his cronies, there is no record of what they sang as they collected the $16,000 per mile from the government for the track laid by the workmen, the $25,000 per mile of excess profits from Credit Mobilier, the 12,800 acres of land per mile, and whatever else they were able to divert from the sales of stocks and bonds.

[A government examiner's] report to Congress, however, like most honest reports that might interfere with the exploitation of the public, was filed away and quickly forgotten by the people's representatives in Washington.

Notwithstanding these distasteful machinations, there is a spirit of adventure in these escapades and a true sense of achievement, albeit tempered by the job being done badly for greed instead of well for progress. The two sides of this coin are perfectly symbolised when the tracks from the east and west are to be joined by a golden spike: executives from both companies, concerned only with finance and not at all with engineering, swing their sledgehammers and miss!

After this first conquest, the book explores other aspects of the railroads' impact: the experiences of travellers, the Hell On Wheels towns that followed the construction teams, the southern and northern lines, the conning of migrants into buying worthless land and their further exploitation through high freight-rates for their meagre produce. The picture is colourful but not pretty, and Brown shows how the outrageous huckstering and profiteering led to the miserable, vestigial railways that drearily cross the USA today, undermaintained, underdeveloped and underused - yet paid for by public taxes several times over.

Although his milieu is the 19th-century, Dee Brown's books teach political lessons that seem ageless. If reading them is sobering, it is nonetheless most certainly educational: we can't learn these things often enough. - Oh, and it's a rollicking good read too.
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There is grandeur in this view of life
Where one becomes many through struggle and strife,
But the Mother of Mysteries is another man's call:
Why is there something 'stead of nothing at all?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2354  Postby NilsGLindgren » Feb 19, 2012 7:48 pm

j.mills wrote:^ To be called Hoard of the Things.

Best I could do, given what I had to work with. :dunno:

:rofl:
j.mills, it's a shame your taste in filmatizations of Lord of the Rings is so execra ... exec ... bad because, you know, sometimes I find that I like you.


I have to be three drinks drunk though.


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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2355  Postby smudge » Feb 19, 2012 8:35 pm

j.mills wrote:Somebody (smudge?) was interested to see how I found the Dee Brown book I was reading, Hear That Lonesome Whistle Blow



Thanks JM, guilty m'lud!

That sounds great, right up my street (as it were).
I'll add it to the list (rather than the pile)! I can't reach the top of the pile anyway....
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2356  Postby Macdoc » Feb 20, 2012 5:03 am

Looking for some modern sailing adventures - racing etc especially at world cup level or the around the world races.

Have read a few and would like more. Prefer non-fiction but a good novel will do.

Just finished the Search for Erewhon and while interesting was a bit trite.

I'd consider another naval series but have read both O'Brian series of 21 books ( the Aubrey-Maturin Series), the Richard Bolitho Novels by Kent and the Ramage series.

Maybe something more modern - Southern Ocean sailing adventures of course are top notch and even some search and rescues etc would do.

This was good for instance as an incredible story of survival ( interesting back story from the modern day as the journal came to light of one of the survivors only a few years back )

The Whaleship Essex: The True Story of Moby Dick ...

maybe will do some hunting here

http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/ssc/books/
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2357  Postby Macdoc » Feb 20, 2012 6:19 am

The Prince of Nothing trilogy ( at least so far a trilogy ).

Interesting - some memorable characters and ideas and images but perhaps too pat.....mixed on it. Pretty unique, perhaps to much parallel with the Crusades - get the first one, see what you think.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2358  Postby surreptitious57 » Feb 20, 2012 6:40 am

Why E Equals M C Squared
Made accessible to those who
are interested in physics like me
but who do not have a degree in the
subject : only couple of dozen diagrams
The writing is fluid and clear and captivates
the reader : book I can thoroughly recommend
Like it enough to want to read it twice and the only
authors I have ever done that for are : Alistair Reynolds
whose best work is Revelation Space and Sven Hassel whose
best is Wheels Of Terror though I prefer Legion Of The Damned
A MIND IS LIKE A PARACHUTE : IT DOES NOT WORK UNLESS IT IS OPEN
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2359  Postby Darkchilde » Feb 20, 2012 12:39 pm

I started Definitely Dead (Sookie Stackhouse #6) by Charlaine Harris.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#2360  Postby Nicko » Feb 20, 2012 12:53 pm

Darkchilde wrote:I started Definitely Dead (Sookie Stackhouse #6) by Charlaine Harris.


I've only ever seen the TV series, True Blood (AKA Dead People in Heat). How do the books compare?
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