What'cha Readin'?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4321  Postby Macdoc » Aug 18, 2018 1:37 am

Round the Bend was very interesting ...I enjoy how he myth creates from his own pilot/engineer life.
It seems an experimental work ... :scratch:

On to

Stephen Morris & Pilotage...

Early novels only released after hos death in 1960 and a linked story.

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These two related novellas, Stephen Morris and Pilotage, were Nevil Shute’s first works of fiction and drew on his own youthful experiences. Both concern young men obsessed with the early world of aviation. Stephen Morris has just called off his engagement to the girl he loves because he is a penniless graduate with no prospects—but for his dream of building airplanes. Pil ...more


Nice tio see the review level on Goodreads
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/148 ... s_Pilotage

The man could engage you in a story like few other writers :coffee:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4322  Postby Peavey » Aug 18, 2018 3:36 am

The Believing Brain, Michael Shermer
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4323  Postby surreptitious57 » Aug 18, 2018 5:17 am

The Koran : a very helpful annotated version which provides a lot of context and clarity
And I also got Never Had It So Good I956 - I963 by Dominic Sandbrook whose Seasons In
The Sun I974 - I979
is quite simply the best social and political history I have ever read
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4324  Postby Macdoc » Aug 20, 2018 1:44 pm

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4325  Postby surreptitious57 » Aug 24, 2018 5:33 pm

Paul Auster : 4 3 2 I

On March 3 I947 Archibald Isaac Ferguson the only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson is born. From that single
beginning Fergusons life will take four simultaneous but entirely different paths. Family fortunes diverge. Loves
and friendships and passions contrast. As each version of Fergusons story rushes across the fractured terrain of mid
twentieth century America a boy grows up - again and again and again


Underworld : Don Delillo

I also wanted this but only had enough money for one. I chose the Auster as it was cheaper and had a more complex
plot although Underworld is regarded as Delillos masterpiece. Rather interestingly both are set in the same time and
place which makes comparison between them relatively easy
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4326  Postby Fallible » Aug 24, 2018 5:34 pm

I read it earlier in the year.
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4327  Postby surreptitious57 » Aug 24, 2018 5:45 pm


I asked about the plot and you said nothing at all

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4328  Postby Fallible » Aug 24, 2018 5:48 pm

You didn't ask about anything. :scratch:
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4329  Postby laklak » Aug 24, 2018 6:04 pm

Currently the "What'cha Reading" thread.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. - Mark Twain
The sky is falling! The sky is falling! - Chicken Little
I never go without my dinner. No one ever does, except vegetarians and people like that - Oscar Wilde
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4330  Postby surreptitious57 » Aug 24, 2018 6:32 pm

I was absolutely certain that I had asked you about the plot but I have
just had a look at the thread and it appears I did not not so I apologise
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4331  Postby felltoearth » Aug 27, 2018 8:40 am

laklak wrote:Currently the "What'cha Reading" thread.

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4332  Postby Dolorosa » Sep 04, 2018 11:58 am

I tend to have several books on a go, so for my work commute, I recently started Charles Pellegrino's To Hell and Back.

It's not a big book, something that would usually take me about 3 days to read but so far I've not been able to muster more than a handful of pages a day. Its content is so horrific that I've been having really disturbing nightmares for the last two nights. The image of a tap dancer seared into my brain. I close my eyes and all I see is devastation depicted in the book; though, no doubt, the reality was far more horrific than anything I could ever imagine. To think that some global powers still consider these weapons to be a viable conflict resolution method is beyond me. Just thinking about it makes me well up. I don't have the strongest of mental health constitutions and this book is clearly taking its toll but it is something that I believe has to be read (even if I have to remind myself to breathe at times.) It is a tremendous book.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4333  Postby Macdoc » Sep 08, 2018 1:53 pm

Reading this
Image

- he mentions casually two capital ships lost ...one the Hood ...did a double take

In 1938 Shute writes What Happened To The Corbetts and says HMS Hood is sunk "in a battle as big as (World War One's Battle of) Jutland." To a 1930s audience this was an unthinkable disaster.
In 1941 HMS Hood was sunk by a single shot from the Bismarck.


https://wwwitiuvacha.blogspot.com/2018/ ... t-iii.html

Bit spooky that :? - re-visiting his novels is such a treat.

On to An OId Captivity.

Image

He's getting into his stride now writing an average of a novel a year from 1940 to 1960.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4334  Postby Macdoc » Sep 11, 2018 8:55 am

Rolling through these a couple a day now. Here's the list should anyone care to take the same journey.

• Stephen Morris (1923, published 1961) ISBN 1-84232-297-4 (with Pilotage: a young pilot takes on a daring and dangerous mission.
• Pilotage (1924, published 1961): a continuation of "Stephen Morris."
• Marazan (1926) ISBN 1-84232-265-6: a convict rescues a downed pilot who helps him break up a drug ring.
• So Disdained (1928) ISBN 1-84232-294-X: published in the US as The Mysterious Aviator, and written soon after the General Strike of 1926, reflected the debate in British Society about socialism. The principled narrator initially chooses loyalty to a friend who betrayed Britain to Russia, over loyalty to his King and country. The book concludes with the narrator joining forces with Italian Fascists against a group of Russian spies.
• Lonely Road (1932) ISBN 1-84232-261-3: This novel deals with conspiracies and counterconspiracies, and experiments with writing styles.
• Ruined City (1938) ISBN 1-84232-290-7: US title: Kindling. A rich banker revives a town economically with a shipbuilding company through questionable financial dealings. He goes to jail for fraud, but the shipyard revives. Ruined City was distilled from Shute's experiences in trying to set up his own aircraft company.
• What Happened to the Corbetts (1938) ISBN 1-84232-302-4: U.S Title: Ordeal. Foretells the German bombing of Southampton early in WWII.
• An Old Captivity (1940) ISBN 1-84232-275-3: the story of a pilot hired to take aerial photographs of a site in Greenland, who suffers a drug-induced flashback to Viking times.
• Landfall: A Channel Story (1940) ISBN 1-84232-258-3. A young RAF pilot and a British barmaid fall in love. His career suffers a setback when he is thought to have sunk a British submarine in error, but he is vindicated.
Pied Piper (1942) ISBN 1-84232-278-8. An old man rescues seven children (one of them the niece of a Gestapo officer) from France during the Nazi invasion.
• Most Secret (1942, published 1945) ISBN 1-84232-269-9. Unconventional attacks on German forces during WWII, using a French fishing boat.
• Pastoral (1944) ISBN 1-84232-277-X. Crew relations and love at an airbase in rural surroundings in wartime England.
• Vinland the Good (film script, 1946) ISBN 1-889439-11-8
• The Seafarers (1946–7, published 2002) ISBN 1-889439-32-0. The story of a dashing British naval Lieutenant and a Wren who meet right at the end of the Second World War. Their romance is blighted by differences in social background and economic constraints; in unhappiness each turns to odd jobs in boating circles.[18]
• The Chequer Board (1947) ISBN 1-84232-248-6: A dying man looks up three wartime comrades, one of which sees Burma during Japanese occupation and in its independence period after the war. The novel contains an interesting discussion of racism in the US and in the US Army stationed in Britain: British townsfolk prefer the company of black soldiers.
• No Highway (1948) ISBN 1-84232-273-7. Set in Britain and Canada, an eccentric "boffin" at RAE Farnborough predicts metal fatigue in a new airliner, but is not believed. Interestingly, the Comet failed for just this reason several years later, in 1954.
• A Town Like Alice (1950) ISBN 1-84232-300-8: US title: The Legacy. The hero and heroine meet while both are prisoners of the Japanese in Malaya (now Malaysia). After the war they seek each other out and reunite in a small Australian town that would have no future if not for her plans to turn it into "a town like Alice."
• Round the Bend (1951) ISBN 1-84232-289-3. About a new religion developing around an aircraft mechanic. Shute considered this his best novel. It tackles racism, condemning the White Australia policy.
• The Far Country (1952) ISBN 1-84232-251-6: A young woman travels to Australia. A condemnation of British socialism and the national health service.
• In the Wet (1953) ISBN 1-84232-254-0. An Anglican priest tells the story of an Australian aviator. This embraces a drug-induced flash forward to Britain in the 1980s. The novel criticises British socialism and anti-monarchism democratic sentiment.
• Slide Rule: Autobiography of an Engineer (1954) ISBN 1-84232-291-5; (1964: Ballantine, New York)
• Requiem for a Wren (1955; US title: The Breaking Wave) ISBN 1-84232-286-9. The story of a young British woman who, plagued with guilt after shooting down a plane carrying Polish refugees in World War II, moves to Australia to work anonymously for the parents of her (now deceased) Australian lover, whilst the lover's brother searches for her in Britain. The title echoes William Faulkner's Requiem for a Nun.
• Beyond the Black Stump (1956) ISBN 1-84232-246-X: The ethical standards of an unconventional family living in a remote part of Australia are compared with those of a conventional family living in Oregon.
• On the Beach (1957) ISBN 1-84232-276-1. Shute's best-known novel, is set in Melbourne, whose population is awaiting death from the effects of an atomic war. It was serialised in more than 40 newspapers, and adapted into a 1959 film starring Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner. In 2007, Gideon Haigh wrote an article in The Monthly arguing that On the Beach is Australia's most important novel: "Most novels of apocalypse posit at least a group of survivors and the semblance of hope. On The Beach allows nothing of the kind."[19][20]
• The Rainbow and the Rose (1958) ISBN 1-84232-283-4: One man's three love stories; narration shifts from the narrator to the main character and back.
• Trustee from the Toolroom (1960) ISBN 1-84232-301-6. Shute's last novel, about the recovery of a lost legacy of diamonds from a wrecked sailboat. Set in Britain, the Pacific Islands and the US northwe


Sitting at Pied Piper beginning just now.

I liked Shute early on in my reading and now a few decades later I enjoy the stories even further after becoming a pilot, spending time in Australia plus extensive WW II reading. He's writing from what he knew and the resulting verisimilitude shows.

Rewarding to see I'm not the only fan

The Nevil Shute Norway Foundation web site is dedicated to the writing, wisdom and philosophy of Nevil Shute Norway. It is a tribute to his skill that more than 55 years after his death, Nevil Shute's works are still enjoyed by so many people around the world.

The Nevil Shute Norway Foundation web site is for, by, and of Nevil Shute readers everywhere. It exists primarily for the exchange of news, opinions, and similar information among readers. Those interested in researching specific aspects of Nevil Shute's life and work will find the site an excellent place to start. It serves as a means of contact with other Shutists, as well as providing much specific Shute related information.

Writings, reviews, comments, biographies, pictures and other information regarding Nevil Shute and the Foundation may be found by clicking on the links at left. The search window can be used to access directly site references containing a given word or phrase.

http://www.nevilshute.org/index.php

:coffee:
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4335  Postby Macdoc » Sep 18, 2018 4:24 pm

Yikes - sucker punched by this - hope no unsuspecting kid falls into this before bed ....

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Brilliant
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4336  Postby surreptitious57 » Sep 26, 2018 5:10 pm

Fallible wrote:
I am interested to see whether you get through the entirety of The Female Eunuch

Raw and brutal and ranty and absolutely delicious. It suffers from stereotyping every women as having unfulfilled potential but as this is the raison d etre of the entire book I can forgive her that particular limitation. It is also of its time but that is not her fault either. She may have fallen from grace since then but this is her crowning achievement and I will definitely be re reading it and others by her also. Shame they dropped that iconic cover which was fucking A. I remember the first time I saw it it made me want to read it to find out just what the hell it was about. And I was not disappointed since there was no way I was not going to finish such a classic piece of modern literature as it even though I had never actually read her before And it is surprisingly rather nuanced in places amid all the anger so there is some balance in there too. So finish it if you can
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4337  Postby Macdoc » Sep 26, 2018 6:17 pm

On the Beach (1957) ISBN 1-84232-276-1. Shute's best-known novel, is set in Melbourne, whose population is awaiting death from the effects of an atomic war. It was serialised in more than 40 newspapers, and adapted into a 1959 film starring Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner. In 2007, Gideon Haigh wrote an article in The Monthly arguing that On the Beach is Australia's most important novel: "Most novels of apocalypse posit at least a group of survivors and the semblance of hope. On The Beach allows nothing of the kind."[19][20]


Part way through and Shute's maturity as a writer shows as the end of the world polite madness sets into Melbourne.
Planting trees, having babies, going to school when they know all will die within a 3-9 month period.
Trying to keep semblance of civilization when the entire north from mid Australia to the North Pole is devoid of any kind of life ....human or animal.

ugh - I hope he's not a prescient about a nuclear war as he was about the Hood. :think:

Takes one down a gloomy path ......and this rise of nationalism, a idiot in the US at the helm .... :yuk: :nono: :?
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4338  Postby smudge » Sep 27, 2018 6:05 am

The Plague, Albert Camus.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4339  Postby Macdoc » Sep 27, 2018 6:16 am

Hmmph and I thought I was on a gloom trip.

Here's a good followup for you

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Outsi ... lin_Wilson)
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4340  Postby crazyfitter » Sep 27, 2018 7:13 pm

I read On the Beach and Round the Bend when at school in the 60’s, the latter 3 times over the years. I never realised he was such a prolific writer. Must revisit.
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