What'cha Readin'?

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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4501  Postby don't get me started » Mar 31, 2020 2:07 pm

crazyfitter wrote:
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He goes on to deal with pigmentation, IQ, sport, and modern subtle racism.



I'm just picking away at a book called 'The Secret Lives of Colour' which I'll review in the other thread when I have finished it.
One of the chapters dealt with the ways that 'skin tone' has been dealt with by people whose business it is to measure colour.
The author mentioned the 'humanae' project in which artist Angelica Dass photographed people against a plain backdrop that corresponded with the Pantone classification for the colour of their skin as measured by pixel matching. It looked really interesting and led me to this website:

https://www.angelicadass.com/humanae-project

Edit for typo
Last edited by don't get me started on Apr 01, 2020 5:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4502  Postby crazyfitter » Mar 31, 2020 9:32 pm

That’s a great little video, I’ve passed it on.
Reading your other review about language I’m reminded of my English teacher back in the 60’s in my SM school. She expressed regret that the invention of the printing press had to some extent ‘frozen’ languages and there was less dynamic change in them since. I’ve often wondered on the truth of it because the language of Shakespeare is far different to current. I suppose it’s all relative.
I was unfortunate once to work near some guys who could barely read and write, their sentences were short and stilted and usually shouted. Often they communicated by grunts and other noises accompanied with lots of facial expressions shrugs and gesticulations. Surely worthy of academic investigation but it would be a brave person who would want to get involved.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4503  Postby Macdoc » Mar 31, 2020 11:18 pm

texting has changed the language and still is, plus English is the great sponge. The French keep trying to freeze thier language ...English just rolls on absorbing and expanding.
Also there are so many dialects even in Merrie Olde
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4504  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 05, 2020 3:11 pm

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Wonderful book. The story of two young gay Irishmen escaping ‘the hunger’ to America where they soon join the Union Army. After fighting Indians they then find themselves fighting fellow Irishmen in the ‘butternut army’; then fighting Indians again. After reading Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee this story has authenticity about it.

It has a happy ending as they settle down on a Tennessee farm with the young Indian girl they adopted as a daughter.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4505  Postby felltoearth » Apr 05, 2020 6:33 pm

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"Walla Walla Bonga!" — Witticism
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4506  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 06, 2020 2:24 pm

Wow, I’m not the only one then!
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4507  Postby Fallible » Apr 06, 2020 4:38 pm

So much this.
She battled through in every kind of tribulation,
She revelled in adventure and imagination.
She never listened to no hater, liar,
Breaking boundaries and chasing fire.
Oh, my my! Oh my, she flies!
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4508  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 13, 2020 4:44 pm

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This is a reread and probably my favourite Grisham novel. Somehow it’s always nice to see the FBI get stiffed.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4509  Postby Macdoc » Apr 13, 2020 11:13 pm

Image

looking forward to it ....but ....when?? - too many books, not enough time. :waah:

Description:
A consideration of all things paper—its invention that revolutionized human civilization; its thousand-fold uses (and misuses), proliferation, and sweeping influence on society; its makers, shapers, collectors, and pulpers—written by the admired cultural historian and author of the trilogy on all things book-related: A Gentle Madness; Patience and Fortitude (“How could any intelligent, literate person not just love this book?”—Simon Winchester); and A Splendor of Letters (“Elegant, wry, and humane”—André Bernard, New York Observer).

Nicholas Basbanes writes about paper, from its invention in China two thousand years ago to its ideal means, recording the thoughts of Islamic scholars and mathematicians that made the Middle East a center of intellectual energy; from Europe, by way of Spain in the twelfth century and Italy in the thirteenth at the time of the Renaissance, to North America and the rest of the inhabited world.

Basbanes writes about the ways in which paper has been used to record history, make laws, conduct business, and establish identities . . . He makes clear that without paper, modern hygienic practice would be unimaginable; that as currency, people will do almost anything to possess it . . . that the Industrial Revolution would never have happened without paper on which to draw designs and blueprints.

We see paper’s crucial role in the unfolding of historical events, political scandals, and sensational trials: how the American Revolution which took shape with the Battle of Lexington and Concord, began with the Stamp Act of 1765 . . . the Dreyfus Affair and the forged memorandum known as “the bordereau” . . . America’s entry into World War I with the Zimmerman Telegram . . . the Alger Hiss spy case and Whittaker Chambers’s testimony involving the notorious Pumpkin Papers . . . Daniel Ellsberg's release of the Pentagon Papers in 1971 and the scandal of Watergate.

Basbanes writes of his travels to get to the source of the story—to China, along the Burma Road, and to Japan, whose handmade paper, washi, is as much an expression of the human spirit as it is of craftsmanship . . . to Landover, Maryland, home of the National Security Agency and its one hundred million ultra secret documents, pulped by cryptologists and sent to be recycled as pizza boxes and egg cartons . . . to the Crane Paper mill of Dalton, Massachusetts, a seventh-generation family-owned enterprise, the exclusive supplier of paper for American currency since 1879 . . . and to the Kimberly-Clark mill in New Milford, Connecticut, manufacturer daily of one million boxes of Kleenex tissue and as many rolls of Scott kitchen towels.

Entertaining, illuminating, irresistible, a book that masterfully guides us through paper’s inseparability from human culture . . .
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Re: The Book Thread 2020

#4510  Postby NamelessFaceless » Apr 17, 2020 4:21 pm

Animavore wrote:I got that Malazan audiobook today and listened to it to, during, and from the gym. I now think audiobooks are better than music for the gym because you get lost in the story and notice the pain less. The audiobook is fantastic. The first thing I noticed, before it even began, is that the narrator said, "Performed by Ralph Lister." Not "Read by Ralph Lister." And what a performance! He does voices and accents for all the characters.

Speaking of getting lost in the story. I also got lost in reality on the way home from the gym while listening to it. I must've taken a wrong turn somewhere because at one point I looked up and I didn't know where the hell I was.

Which makes me question why anyone would listen to it on a motorcycle.


This is why I listen to audiobooks while doing my gardening. I can spend hours pulling out weeds and not really thinking about it because I'm engrossed in an audiobook.

And you're right about the performance. You should really listen to Ulysses or Moby Dick. There's also a version of Tom Sawyer performed by Nick Offerman that's outstanding.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4511  Postby chairman bill » Apr 17, 2020 5:43 pm

I'm currently reading Richard Dawkins' The Greatest Show on Earth. Really good read, full of fascinating facts. Highly recommended.
“There is a rumour going around that I have found God. I think this is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.” Terry Pratchett
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4512  Postby Ironclad » Apr 17, 2020 9:45 pm

I got the CDs for me mamma a few xmases past. I think she pawned it.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4513  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 20, 2020 12:29 pm

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I found The Testaments to be a strange book. On the one hand the characterisations and the scheming were well done but the whole concept of the USA turning into this mad religious autocratic Gilead was just too much. I found myself checking how many pages I had left to read and that’s never a good sign.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4514  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 22, 2020 5:12 pm

Mary Carruthers The Book of Memory.

Second Edition
. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 70. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008; ebook 2013.
The Medieval Craft of Memory: An Anthology of Texts and Pictures
(a collection of translated medieval texts, edited with Jan Ziolkowski).

Material Texts series. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002.
"We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4515  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 22, 2020 5:22 pm

"We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4516  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 22, 2020 5:40 pm

This subject appears to have been badly infested by fasco Christians of the homeschooling type, and I found that fascinating as it only an educational tool that has been badly neglected along with the general habit of seeing anything medieval as not good. I think it has very important lessons about why we are consistently getting things so badly wrong for example about injustice and ecosystems
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4517  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 22, 2020 5:42 pm

Wiki and Britannica are very very poor and misleading on this subject
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4518  Postby BrettA » Apr 25, 2020 3:59 am

Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee - An Indian History of the American West by Dee Brown, Copyright 1970 with new Forward.

A very worthwhile read and it's on The Guardian's Best 100 Non-Fiction Book List.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4519  Postby Svartalf » Apr 25, 2020 7:16 pm

got a buncha books on mummies, egyptian and other, out of my shelves and am getting ready to tackle them.
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Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4520  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 26, 2020 12:09 pm

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I’m about halfway through this and I’m amazed at what I didn’t know and I mean on a big scale as well as the small nitty gritty. What staggers me is the amount of polity that went on over the dining table. I believe that breakfast, lunch and dinner were invented purely to discuss diplomatic policy and war. Why couldn’t everyone stay at home and make themselves beans on toast?

Another shock was the age of some of the people involved. Some of them were dying of cancer. Some generals on the battlefield died of heart attacks. The shear incompetence of politicians and battlefield managers was staggering.

It’s put me in a dark place reading this, I might just go and drink some bleach.
No not really.
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