What'cha Readin'?

Discuss books here.

Moderators: Blip, The_Metatron

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4721  Postby crazyfitter » Apr 29, 2021 4:47 pm

F96AA1AF-07D5-442D-8170-06D435662D63.jpeg
F96AA1AF-07D5-442D-8170-06D435662D63.jpeg (94.29 KiB) Viewed 349 times


So here we are in the Israel - Palestine conflict and seeing the conflict from both sides. The book is an award winner and shortlisted for more and I can understand why.

It is the story of a Bassam Aramin and Rami Elhanan and the deaths of their daughters Abir and Smadar, one with a rubber bullet to the back of the head and the other by a suicide bomber. We look at how these two men meet, their growing friendship and their campaigning for peace, which is still ongoing. We learn of the daily obstacles that Palestinians face just going to work or travelling about. The check points. The random strip searches, then having to squat over a floor mirror. The way 20 day eviction notices would be put under stones so inhabitants wouldn’t see them then the soldiers arriving to empty the dwellings into skips. At meetings the disbelief from Israelis when they hear these things and the hostility Israelis give to Rami. Having to persuade one of his sons not to go seeking vengeance. And the death threats against him.

The book is divided into 1001 chapters but many are single sentences. The subject matter covers many things like birds and their migrations, Francois Mitterrands last meal and how a rubber bullet is made. It all reads so strangely but all the apparent disparities come together and make sense.

The story has been much written about and a film made. I highly recommend it. Although the subject matter is depressing a sense of optimism comes through and the sense that the human spirit will win through in the end.
The slap in the face that is offered by anti-rationalist, pseudo-scientists and anti-intellectuals that infest much of public discourse is a sad coda to what has been achieved these centuries past by the scientific method - don’t get me started
crazyfitter
 
Posts: 899
Male

Country: Northumbria
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4722  Postby smudge » May 09, 2021 8:10 am

The Trouble with Peace, Joe Abercrombie.

(Hi all- been away for many moons)
User avatar
smudge
 
Posts: 2718
Male

Country: UK
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4723  Postby BrettA » Jun 08, 2021 11:43 pm

Evolution; The Modern Synthesis - The Definitive Edition... by Julian Huxley 1942
My Wiki Page (Contribs: photos & other): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:BrettA343
User avatar
BrettA
 
Posts: 366
Age: 74
Male

Country: Canada
Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4724  Postby Spearthrower » Jun 09, 2021 3:59 am

BrettA wrote:Evolution; The Modern Synthesis - The Definitive Edition... by Julian Huxley 1942



Assuming you've got the later print, his (and other scientists') introductions to the later editions are worth the read alone! Still a phenomenal account of the modern synthesis even after the best part of a century!
I'm not an atheist; I just don't believe in gods :- that which I don't belong to isn't a group!
Religion: Mass Stockholm Syndrome

Learn Stuff. Stuff good. https://www.coursera.org/
User avatar
Spearthrower
 
Posts: 28754
Age: 45
Male

Country: Thailand
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4725  Postby Coastal » Jun 19, 2021 3:03 pm

crazyfitter wrote:
314DB514-19E1-47B3-9257-F2B9B26A47AF.jpeg


I enjoyed the film and always knew I’d get round to reading the book one day. Except that the book, in spite of the title, is of Jack Aubrey’s exploits in the Mediterranean. My bad. Maybe I’ll get round to the book of the film eventually.
I was a bit taken aback by the style of prose but maybe it is true to the era and the middle class/ autocratic nature of military officers. If my wife had read this I’m sure she would quickly have said her favourite put down of such people ‘Oh jolly hockey sticks’, regardless of gender. Politics, double dealing and philosophy interspersed with naval escapades, what more can you want.

I was prompted to look on YouTube at a brief life of Thomas Cochrane a real life Captain and Admiral from that era and found that the exploits of the fictional Jack Aubrey were a copy of Cochrane’s. I’ll look forward to reading another of the books soon.


They used a few of the books to "compile" the screenplay of the movie. I also started reading the series because I so loved the movie and just wanted the adventures to continue. It is a good thing that you started at the first book, though. Don't worry about the prose and sea slang and phrases too much. You soon pick up enough to get along. One of my most prized possessions is the series of all 20 books and the one unfinished manuscript. POB dies at his desk, still writing. I've read the series twice and if only there was more time in-between my other reading, I would go on another "circumnavigation". I would urge you to continue the voyage, it is one of the most lovely series ever written, while being one of the most historically authentic stories of that time period you're ever likely to find.

As an aside, and as a fellow fan of the movie, I quite enjoyed this review. The only criticism is that he didn't mention that the historical authenticity of the movie was because of its source material, the novels. He was soon corrected in the comments though :grin:

Last edited by Coastal on Jun 20, 2021 8:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Coastal
 
Posts: 663
Age: 45
Male

Country: South Africa
South Africa (za)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4726  Postby Coastal » Jun 19, 2021 3:38 pm

Been getting back into reading (hooray). The last few book I've read:

The Saints of Salvation by Peter F. Hamilton
The Trouble With Peace by Joe Abercrombie
Rhythm of War by Brandon Sanderson
N.K. Jemisin - The Broken Earth Trilogy
Salvation Lost (Salvation Sequence Series, n. 2) by Peter F. Hamilton

Currently reading the Machineries of Empire trilogy by Yoon Ha Lee
User avatar
Coastal
 
Posts: 663
Age: 45
Male

Country: South Africa
South Africa (za)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4727  Postby Challenger007 » Jul 28, 2021 11:14 am

I purchased the novel The second life of Uwe by Frederick Buckman. I liked the adaptation, but the books are usually much more interesting and detailed.
Challenger007
 
Name: Alex Johnson
Posts: 38

Country: Illinois
United States (us)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4728  Postby murshid » Aug 24, 2021 6:28 pm

The God Virus by Darrel W. Ray.

Image
.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" – Douglas Adams
User avatar
murshid
 
Name: Murshid
Posts: 8756
Age: 39
Male

Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4729  Postby Macdoc » Aug 25, 2021 9:09 am

Total escape - having been to the Snowy Mountains recently where it is set just lets me drift right into the books and learn a fair bit.
Drifts more to YA than children's books as some Bambi moments but great adventure written from a wild brumby's view.

Silver Brumby Series
12 primary works
The Silver Brumby series is a collection of fiction children's books by Australian author Elyne Mitchell. They recount the life and adventures of Thowra, a magnificent pale brumby stallion, and his descendants, and are set in the Snowy Mountains region of Australia.


and

Image
Insanely innovative on a wide variety of aspects. Enjoying on audio books.
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
 
Posts: 17190
Age: 73
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4730  Postby Macdoc » Aug 25, 2021 9:19 am

crazyfitter wrote:
314DB514-19E1-47B3-9257-F2B9B26A47AF.jpeg

I enjoyed the film and always knew I’d get round to reading the book one day. Except that the book, in spite of the title, is of Jack Aubrey’s exploits in the Mediterranean. My bad. Maybe I’ll get round to the book of the film eventually.
I was a bit taken aback by the style of prose but maybe it is true to the era and the middle class/ autocratic nature of military officers. If my wife had read this I’m sure she would quickly have said her favourite put down of such people ‘Oh jolly hockey sticks’, regardless of gender. Politics, double dealing and philosophy interspersed with naval escapades, what more can you want.


There are 21 books in the series and they are mesmerizing - Patrick O'Brian is considered the best historical fiction writer around and he indeed gets you into the language of the time. I learned so much as each book is based loosely on actual events and the insights into a sea captain at home are hilarious.

Patrick O'Brian's twenty-one-volume Aubrey/Maturin series has delighted generations of devoted fans, inspired a blockbuster film, and sold millions of copies in twenty-four languages. These five omnibus volumes, beautifully produced and boxed, contain 7,000 pages of what has often been described as a single, continuous narrative. They are a perfect tribute for such a literary achievement, and a perfect gift for the O'Brian enthusiast.
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
 
Posts: 17190
Age: 73
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4731  Postby BrettA » Aug 29, 2021 3:34 am

Spearthrower wrote:
BrettA wrote:Evolution; The Modern Synthesis - The Definitive Edition... by Julian Huxley 1942 (updated a few times to get to the Definitive Edition, © 2010)

Assuming you've got the later print, his (and other scientists') introductions to the later editions are worth the read alone! Still a phenomenal account of the modern synthesis even after the best part of a century!

Thanks muchly for the tip, received just now, Spearthrower :-).
My Wiki Page (Contribs: photos & other): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:BrettA343
User avatar
BrettA
 
Posts: 366
Age: 74
Male

Country: Canada
Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4732  Postby Macdoc » Sep 02, 2021 6:58 pm

double post
Last edited by Macdoc on Sep 02, 2021 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
 
Posts: 17190
Age: 73
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4733  Postby Macdoc » Sep 02, 2021 7:03 pm

Some books are seminal and change one's perception in a large way ...this is one.

snip
The science of baking developed alongside the seed harvests. Richard Fullagar, at the Australian Museum, and Judith Field, at the University of New South Wales, found grindstones at Cuddie Springs, near Walgett, in western New South Wales, which had been used to grind seeds more than 30,000 years ago. This makes these people the world's oldest bakers by almost 15,000 years, as the Egyptians, the next earliest, didn't bake until 17,000 BC.27 Other peoples ground tubers to extract starch, but it seems that Aboriginal people were the first to discover the alchemy of baking bread from the flour of grass seeds.
And this baking was not a one-off occurrence. Archaeologists have found a 25,000-year-old grindstone at distant Kakadu in the Northern Territory: the bakers of antiquity. Why don't our hearts fill with wonder and pride?


Image

https://www.booktopia.com.au/dark-emu-b ... 48016.html
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
 
Posts: 17190
Age: 73
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: What'cha Readin'?

#4734  Postby Macdoc » Sep 08, 2021 2:38 am

Three books The Dry, Force of Nature and this all by Jane Harper. A bit formulaic but enjoy the setting on them all ...this set one not far west from Cairns....

Image
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
 
Posts: 17190
Age: 73
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Previous

Return to Books

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 4 guests