What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#41  Postby Mike_L » Dec 18, 2017 5:22 pm

Any of you cold-clime dwellers ever experimented with the Mpemba effect...?

Boiling water flung into air at sub-zero temp = instant "snow"...

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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#42  Postby The_Piper » Dec 18, 2017 5:40 pm

The_Metatron wrote:So, this isn’t you then?

Image


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:lol: That's what I mean. At least her heels are on boots though, that helps.

I've brought this up a handful of times on this forum, but a word to the wise when traveling in the extreme cold, bring warm clothes, blanket, make sure your cell phone is charged, etc, in case you have a break down. I've had a relative travel 2 hours, half of which is in places with no cell coverage, in frigid temps, to visit and not even have a jacket with him. With sneakers on his feet. Obviously I've tried to relay this pointer to him, with a reply of "yep".
No vehicle is reliable enough to do that, imo.
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#43  Postby Mike_L » Dec 18, 2017 5:44 pm

Just done a Google Images search: "nude in the snow". It's surprising the number of photographs it brings up! :shifty:
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#44  Postby The_Piper » Dec 18, 2017 5:46 pm

Mike_L wrote:Just done a Google Images search: "nude in the snow". It's surprising the number of photographs it brings up! :shifty:
:lol: :pc:
Mike_L wrote:Any of you cold-clime dwellers ever experimented with the Mpemba effect...?

Boiling water flung into air at sub-zero temp = instant "snow"...


That would be cool to try. I'm not going out in -29f/-33c weather though, if we have any of that this year. :lol: I'll try it at something like -10f/-23c though. I've had supercooled water happen a number of times now, in 16 oz bottles of water accidentally left in the van overnight.
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#45  Postby Mike_L » Dec 18, 2017 6:01 pm

supercooled water

Yes, I've done that one with my freezer. Spectacular! :grin:

Also the supercooled brine...
Salt sprinkled on crushed ice. According to this, the temp of the brine can fall as low as -6 degrees F.
I've used the technique to make fruit sherbet. Fruit juice in a metal bowl within the salt-ice 'bath', stirring constantly to keep the crystals of fruity ice fine. Nice in summer!
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#46  Postby The_Piper » Dec 18, 2017 6:20 pm

Mike_L wrote:
supercooled water

Yes, I've done that one with my freezer. Spectacular! :grin:

Also the supercooled brine...
Salt sprinkled on crushed ice. According to this, the temp of the brine can fall as low as -6 degrees F.
I've used the technique to make fruit sherbet. Fruit juice in a metal bowl within the salt-ice 'bath', stirring constantly to keep the crystals of fruity ice fine. Nice in summer!

Yeah that makes sense, since rock salt is used to melt ice on roads and walkways. I never thought to use it in a culinary setting! :)
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#47  Postby Mike_L » Dec 18, 2017 6:46 pm

Oh yes. See here! :smile:
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#48  Postby scott1328 » Dec 18, 2017 9:27 pm

Mike_L wrote:Any of you cold-clime dwellers ever experimented with the Mpemba effect...?

Boiling water flung into air at sub-zero temp = instant "snow"...


New Year's Eve 1999, it was -20F/C in Omaha. We had some friends over and we performed that same experiment. First we flung boiling water straight up into the air: it came down exactly like the video: as snow. My friends insisted that room temperature water would do the same thing. I warned my friends, do not fling the tepid water straight up or else be soaked... did not take advice and was pelted with the water.
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#49  Postby Mike_L » Dec 19, 2017 6:46 am

scott1328 wrote:New Year's Eve 1999, it was -20F/C in Omaha. We had some friends over and we performed that same experiment. First we flung boiling water straight up into the air: it came down exactly like the video: as snow. My friends insisted that room temperature water would do the same thing. I warned my friends, do not fling the tepid water straight up or else be soaked... did not take advice and was pelted with the water.

:lol: I bet he rushed indoors pretty quickly after that!
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#50  Postby mattthomas » Dec 19, 2017 12:40 pm

I've had ~50c+ in Egypt and -17c in the UK
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#51  Postby Calilasseia » Dec 19, 2017 5:56 pm

The_Piper wrote:Cool. :lol: I have no conception of how hot that is, but it sounds bad.


Your quick guide ... :)

273 Kelvins - equals 0°C or 32°F. Freezing point of water at 1 atmosphere pressure on Earth.

373 Kelvins - equals 100°C or 212°F. Boiling point of water at 1 atmosphere pressure on Earth.

2000 Kelvins - Iron is now liquid at this temperature, along with many other metals.

5000 Kelvins - Iron, and virtually every other metal, has now boiled and become a gas at this temperature, which is the surface temperature of the Sun.

100,000 Kelvins - At this temperature, neutral atoms all cease to exist. All the chemical elements are now totally ionised plasmas, with atomic nuclei moving around in seas of electrons.

10,000,000 Kelvins - at this temperature, nuclear fusion can take place between Deuterium and Tritium. (You have to increase the temperature to 15 million Kelvins if you want proton-proton fusion).

340,000,000 Kelvins - at this temperature, the Triple-Alpha Process can take place, in which three Helium nuclei undergo fusion to form Carbon. Additionally, some of the Carbon nuclei will fuse with another Helium nucleus to produce Oxygen. If you want other fusion reactions, such as the production of Neon, you have to increase the temperature beyond this, to around 500 million Kelvins.

Start going beyond 1010 Kelvins, and you're into realms where weird particles start appearing spontaneously for macroscopic time periods. When you hit 1020 Kelvins, you start seeing particles such as charmed protons appearing (albeit fairly briefly). Reach 1040 Kelvins, and this is the sort of temperature needed for the extra-exotic particles of supersymmetric particle theories to put in an appearance. Here, you start seeing such oddities as Vector Higgs Bosons, the various "inos", such as winos, zinos and Higgsinos, and possibly the squarks (yes, such particles are postulated by physicists).
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#52  Postby surreptitious57 » Dec 19, 2017 6:22 pm

I no longer have any heating on in winter because I find that natural cold is more preferable to artificial warmth
Rather conveniently the last four winters over here have been rather mild which is even less reason to have it on
This winter there have been no more than five cold days and so hopefully this trend shall continue for a long time
And men walking around wearing insufficient clothing is not just limited to Scousers because I am exactly the same
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#53  Postby Just A Theory » Dec 21, 2017 1:50 am

For cold, the lowest I got to was about -20C (-4F) at the top of the Matterhorn.

Hottest was +45C (113F) in Newcastle, Australia just before its famous earthquake. Ridiculously hot day.
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#54  Postby surreptitious57 » Dec 21, 2017 11:32 am

minus 8 / plus 30 probably

Very cold has one advantage over very hot in that if all else fails you can simply go to sleep
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#55  Postby The_Piper » Dec 21, 2017 12:58 pm

surreptitious57 wrote:I no longer have any heating on in winter because I find that natural cold is more preferable to artificial warmth
Rather conveniently the last four winters over here have been rather mild which is even less reason to have it on
This winter there have been no more than five cold days and so hopefully this trend shall continue for a long time
And men walking around wearing insufficient clothing is not just limited to Scousers because I am exactly the same

What do you do when your toilet freezes over?
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#56  Postby surreptitious57 » Dec 21, 2017 1:18 pm

I have no objection to using heat for any reason as long as it is not to keep me warm
So heating up water pipes is acceptable even though I have only had to do this twice
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#57  Postby The_Piper » Dec 21, 2017 4:42 pm

surreptitious57 wrote:I have no objection to using heat for any reason as long as it is not to keep me warm
So heating up water pipes is acceptable even though I have only had to do this twice

Mind if I ask why you're opposed to using heat to keep yourself warm?
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#58  Postby Macdoc » Dec 21, 2017 4:49 pm

He wants to live forever...


Being cool: how body temperature influences ageing and longevity
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486781/
by G Keil - ‎2015 - ‎Cited by 19 - ‎Related articles
Apr 2, 2015 - Many life-extending manipulations in rodents, such as caloric restriction, also decrease core body temperature. .... In the lab, two classic studies by Walford and colleagues on the effect of temperature on the longevity of the short-lived fish Cynolebias showed that a 5 and 6 °C drop in temperature increased ...
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#59  Postby surreptitious57 » Dec 21, 2017 5:32 pm

I do not like artificial heating methods and so I prefer to leave it to nature
This has the advantage of making myself slightly more resilient to the cold
I can tolerate temperatures below freezing so have a degree of resistance
Winters pass so it is just a question of having the will to see them through

I have no intention of living beyond eighty so have only twenty seven years to go
Although given how I walk every where that might inadvertently add a few years
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Re: What's the most extreme temperatures you've experienced?

#60  Postby The_Piper » Dec 21, 2017 6:58 pm

surreptitious57 wrote:I do not like artificial heating methods and so I prefer to leave it to nature
This has the advantage of making myself slightly more resilient to the cold
I can tolerate temperatures below freezing so have a degree of resistance
Winters pass so it is just a question of having the will to see them through

I have no intention of living beyond eighty so have only twenty seven years to go
Although given how I walk every where that might inadvertently add a few years

That wouldn't work here on days like today. It's sunny, windy, and -11c. It was about -20c this morning.
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