A Congo Witchcraft Business Model

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A Congo Witchcraft Business Model

#1  Postby Loren Michael » Apr 09, 2013 5:03 am

http://worldcrunch.com/culture-society/ ... WOf95NmiSo

It should be noted that the witchcraft trials are not free, and are an important source of revenue for the tribal chief. Before the dispute can be brought to the court, each party has to pay a mandatory fee of $200 – the price of a cow – whether they can afford it or not.

The headmaster of a primary school situated in Rubanga, 10 kilometers from the village of Lemera, says the witchcraft trials are just a way to exploit the local poor farmers in order to generate revenue for the tribal chief. “It would be naïve to think this is a real test of witchcraft. The tribal judges, who are pawns of the
Mwami, are bribed to hand out false verdicts,” he says.
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Re: A Congo Witchcraft Business Model

#2  Postby Ihavenofingerprints » Apr 09, 2013 5:14 am

To detect signs of witchcraft, the “judge” uses a nylon thread that is “extraordinary and resistant,” explained the tribal elders that we spoke to. The thread is put on a metal plate, which is heated with fire. If the thread breaks, the person on trial is a witch.


Well, can't argue with that. :coffee:
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Re: A Congo Witchcraft Business Model

#3  Postby Loren Michael » Apr 09, 2013 6:09 am

Thread made of wool is civilization.

Nylon is for cargo cults.
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Re: A Congo Witchcraft Business Model

#4  Postby Matt_B » Apr 09, 2013 11:15 am

I suppose it's just the old adage that it's more important for justice to be seen to be done than whether it actually is or not.

When you unravel what can sometimes go in inside courts of law in the developed world, the process isn't exactly that dissimilar. And you'd be very lucky to get off with less than the price of a cow in legal fees.
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