Do Patents Impede Later Innovation? (Loren ITT NAO!)

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Do Patents Impede Later Innovation? (Loren ITT NAO!)

#1  Postby GT2211 » May 16, 2013 2:34 am

Overall, our findings show that patent rights block cumulative innovation only in very specific environments, and this suggests that remedial government policies should be targeted. A ‘broad based’ scaling back of patent rights is unlikely to be the most appropriate policy. It is preferable to design policies and institutions that facilitate more efficient licensing, and thereby promote cumulative innovation without diluting the innovation incentives that patent rights provide. One interesting example of such institutions are the biological resource centers in the US studied by Furman and Stern (2011), which reduce the ‘transactional’ costs of accessing knowledge inputs.

http://www.voxeu.org/article/do-patent- ... innovation

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Re: Do Patents Impede Later Innovation? (Loren ITT NAO!)

#2  Postby Macdoc » May 16, 2013 2:37 am

I'd agree with the snippet. "only specific" and think that predation prevention should be vigorously pursued ( submarine patents ).
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Re: Do Patents Impede Later Innovation? (Loren ITT NAO!)

#3  Postby Loren Michael » May 16, 2013 2:50 am

I think that innovation is one of the problems with patents, but I don't see anything wrong with the notion of patents as such; I think they're appropriate sometimes, but are also clearly something that can be misused, and some of that misuse may result in a loss of innovation. My primary concern is with respect to costs to consumers (which is itself partially informed by a loss of innovation representing opportunity costs...)
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