Does immigration hurt support for the welfare state?

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Re: Does immigration hurt support for the welfare state?

#61  Postby FACT-MAN-2 » Jun 27, 2013 10:47 pm

Loren Michael wrote:

Aside from the unemployment rate rising from 5.0 in April 1980 to 7.1 in July, which should be expected with such a large increase of workers, the actual damage to the economy was marginal and followed trends across the United States at the time. When observing data from 1979 to 1985 on the Miami labor market and comparing it to similar data from several other major cities across the United States focusing on wages it is clear that the effects of the boatlift were marginal.[5]

The wages for Caucasians remained steady in both Miami and comparative cities. Likewise the wage rates for African Americans were relatively steady from 1979 to 1985 when in comparable cities it dropped. Aside from a dip in 1983, wage rates for Non-Cuban Hispanics were stable, when in comparable cities it fell approximately six percent.

There is no evidence of a negative effect on wage rates for other groups of Hispanics in Miami. Wages for Cubans demonstrated a steady decline especially compared to other groups in Miami at the time, however, this can be attributed exclusively to the 'dilution' of the group with the new, less-experienced and lower-earning Mariel immigrants, meaning that there is also no evidence of a negative effect on wage rates for Cubans already residing in Miami prior to 1980.[/i]


You're explicitly ignoring evidence now. You say something without evidence, I show evidence that you're wrong, and you maintain your original opinion. That's not trustworthy behavior, that's you ignoring reality.

Bullshit. I didn't even mention the depressive effect of in-migrating Cubans on others in the exising South Florida economy. My point had to do with the nature of that in-migrations effects of displacing low wage workers out of the South Florida economy, a point you either missed completely or ignored.
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Re: Does immigration hurt support for the welfare state?

#62  Postby Loren Michael » Jun 28, 2013 5:15 am

FACT-MAN-2 wrote:
Loren Michael wrote:

Aside from the unemployment rate rising from 5.0 in April 1980 to 7.1 in July, which should be expected with such a large increase of workers, the actual damage to the economy was marginal and followed trends across the United States at the time. When observing data from 1979 to 1985 on the Miami labor market and comparing it to similar data from several other major cities across the United States focusing on wages it is clear that the effects of the boatlift were marginal.[5]

The wages for Caucasians remained steady in both Miami and comparative cities. Likewise the wage rates for African Americans were relatively steady from 1979 to 1985 when in comparable cities it dropped. Aside from a dip in 1983, wage rates for Non-Cuban Hispanics were stable, when in comparable cities it fell approximately six percent.

There is no evidence of a negative effect on wage rates for other groups of Hispanics in Miami. Wages for Cubans demonstrated a steady decline especially compared to other groups in Miami at the time, however, this can be attributed exclusively to the 'dilution' of the group with the new, less-experienced and lower-earning Mariel immigrants, meaning that there is also no evidence of a negative effect on wage rates for Cubans already residing in Miami prior to 1980.[/i]


You're explicitly ignoring evidence now. You say something without evidence, I show evidence that you're wrong, and you maintain your original opinion. That's not trustworthy behavior, that's you ignoring reality.

Bullshit. I didn't even mention the depressive effect of in-migrating Cubans on others in the exising South Florida economy. My point had to do with the nature of that in-migrations effects of displacing low wage workers out of the South Florida economy, a point you either missed completely or ignored.


If wages remained steady, that suggests what you're talking about didn't happen.

Not that you've shown any evidence anyways. I'm extending you a lot of goodwill by taking your word for this stuff. You've shown no evidence whatsoever, only opinion.
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