Adoptions

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Re: Adoptions

#21  Postby Elena » Mar 21, 2010 10:32 pm

pcCoder wrote:In high school, I had a teacher who him and his wife adopted a child from somewhere overseas instead of the U.S. because it was so much easier of a process.

The process is not easier in international adoption. It's much more demanding in terms of paperwork, expenses and time. You may need to travel aborad more than once, for several weeks. Plus, a country may decide to close its international adoption program just when you've been cleared and are only waiting on your child. It happened to us. That means you need to start the process from scratch. Each country is different and has its own requirements. Also, translations of documents need to be in the country's main/official language.

What is much higher when adopting abroad is the likelihood of adopting a relatively healthy baby or toddler within a sane period of time (say, 1.5-3 years since beginning paperwork).
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Re: Adoptions

#22  Postby Warren Dew » Mar 21, 2010 11:32 pm

Elena wrote:What is much higher when adopting abroad is the likelihood of adopting a relatively healthy baby or toddler within a sane period of time (say, 1.5-3 years since beginning paperwork).

Yes. Also, the finality of the adoption is stronger, because it's harder for overseas parents to sue to get back their kids if they change their minds.
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Re: Adoptions

#23  Postby Millefleur » Mar 22, 2010 12:17 am

Warren Dew wrote:
Elena wrote:What is much higher when adopting abroad is the likelihood of adopting a relatively healthy baby or toddler within a sane period of time (say, 1.5-3 years since beginning paperwork).

Yes. Also, the finality of the adoption is stronger, because it's harder for overseas parents to sue to get back their kids if they change their minds.



Can people actually do that?! I believe in the UK its binding?

My neighbour (single female, very close to 50) adopted a little girl 18-ish months ago, the process itself took a couple of years I think and was very intrusive but obviously so worth it. She's had alot of lows, being a single and working new parent but once they reach 3+ they're very portable and there's alot of fun to be had adventuring and exploring together.

Good luck :cheers:
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Re: Adoptions

#24  Postby LIFE » Mar 22, 2010 12:35 am

Warren Dew wrote:
LIFE wrote:And there's millions of orphaned children who need a home, I don't consider my reduced freedom to be a sacrifice there. Just a shift in experiences ;)

I don't think the situation is as simple as that. Here's a good discussion from RDF:

http://forum.richarddawkins.net/viewtop ... 2&t=102268

I especially recommend the post from Halkieria on p4 or so.


Whoa, thanks for the pointer, very insightful indeed :thumbup:
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Re: Adoptions

#25  Postby Elena » Mar 22, 2010 12:46 am

Warren Dew wrote:
Elena wrote:What is much higher when adopting abroad is the likelihood of adopting a relatively healthy baby or toddler within a sane period of time (say, 1.5-3 years since beginning paperwork).

Yes. Also, the finality of the adoption is stronger, because it's harder for overseas parents to sue to get back their kids if they change their minds.

US parents can sue all they want after the adoption is final. The child placed in adoption is not returnable. That's why US birth mothers, for example, having selected during their pregnancy the adoptive parents they want for their child, cannot sign the parental right termination until 72 hs of the birth of the child. The birth mother must meet him/her child. Once she signs, it's final. Birth fathers can sign or fail to appear after public notices have been posted; their rights end either way.

OTOH, if the birth mother changes her mind, the newborn stays with her.
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Re: Adoptions

#26  Postby Warren Dew » Mar 22, 2010 2:13 am

Elena wrote:That's why US birth mothers, for example, having selected during their pregnancy the adoptive parents they want for their child, cannot sign the parental right termination until 72 hs of the birth of the child. The birth mother must meet him/her child. Once she signs, it's final. Birth fathers can sign or fail to appear after public notices have been posted; their rights end either way.

I was thinking more of the case of adopting out of foster care, which I believe represents a much bigger proportion of the pool of adoptable children in the U.S. In those cases, the child may have originally been taken away from the mother against her will, even if she later changes her mind, and you may have the child with you for quite a while before the adoption become final.
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Re: Adoptions

#27  Postby katja z » Mar 22, 2010 12:43 pm

Elena wrote:
pcCoder wrote:In high school, I had a teacher who him and his wife adopted a child from somewhere overseas instead of the U.S. because it was so much easier of a process.

The process is not easier in international adoption. It's much more demanding in terms of paperwork, expenses and time.

Probably depends on where you live and where you go to adopt a child. I know that relatively many people from Slovenia prefer to adopt a child from Russia, because it's easier and quicker (but you're right about the expenses!). In Slovenia the legal procedure is complicated and often foster care is preferred to adoption, so very few children are actually adopted (I think this system, which sets the parents' rights above the child's needs, is very bad, but ...). I don't know about Germany though. I suppose each country has its own policies when it comes to adoption so it's difficult to generalize.

Good luck Life! :cheers:
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Re: Adoptions

#28  Postby Elena » Mar 22, 2010 1:38 pm

Warren Dew wrote:
Elena wrote:That's why US birth mothers, for example, having selected during their pregnancy the adoptive parents they want for their child, cannot sign the parental right termination until 72 hs of the birth of the child. The birth mother must meet him/her child. Once she signs, it's final. Birth fathers can sign or fail to appear after public notices have been posted; their rights end either way.

I was thinking more of the case of adopting out of foster care, which I believe represents a much bigger proportion of the pool of adoptable children in the U.S. In those cases, the child may have originally been taken away from the mother against her will, even if she later changes her mind, and you may have the child with you for quite a while before the adoption become final.

The pool may be larger, but in the US adoption from foster care represents only 15-16% of all adoptions. And only 2% of those children are infants. Life has not indicated that he'd prefer an older child, or to expose himself to the risk of a legal battle that may arise in the foster care v. adoption v. return to birth parents conundrum.

But anyway, all this is rather irrelevant to Germany :tongue:
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