Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolution

Discussions for education, teaching & parenting.

Moderators: Blip, The_Metatron

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#21  Postby mmmcheezy » Mar 31, 2010 7:12 pm

Shrunk wrote:
mmmcheezy wrote:
Warren Dew wrote:
mmmcheezy wrote:All I'm saying is that nobody should take a career that they can't do correctly. If you're a biology teacher, your job is to teach biology, which includes evolution [and has for many many years now].

If they are education majors, how are they supposed to realize that they can't teach biology correctly? They may never have been exposed to any real science, let alone evolution, so they don't have any basis to know just how critical evolution is to biology.

Well, it's things like this [and many others] that make it so OBVIOUS that our education system needs a major overhaul.


What do you think of that idea I suggested above: Making teaching into a profession that pays like medicine or law but also requires postgraduate level training, including specific training in particular areas of specialty, such as science, math etc at least to the level of a university undergrad?

Honestly, I thought that was the way it already was, so I'm pretty appalled that it's not. I don't know a great deal about what kind of requirements are in place for teachers, and it's obvious that they're not stringent enough. I think that's a reasonable idea.
http://www.rantingnraging.tumblr.com

I'm not larger than life, I'm not taller than trees
User avatar
mmmcheezy
RS Donator
 
Posts: 4171
Age: 33
Female

Country: USA
United States (us)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#22  Postby Lazar » Mar 31, 2010 7:42 pm

Shrunk wrote:
mmmcheezy wrote:
Warren Dew wrote:
mmmcheezy wrote:All I'm saying is that nobody should take a career that they can't do correctly. If you're a biology teacher, your job is to teach biology, which includes evolution [and has for many many years now].

If they are education majors, how are they supposed to realize that they can't teach biology correctly? They may never have been exposed to any real science, let alone evolution, so they don't have any basis to know just how critical evolution is to biology.

Well, it's things like this [and many others] that make it so OBVIOUS that our education system needs a major overhaul.


What do you think of that idea I suggested above: Making teaching into a profession that pays like medicine or law but also requires postgraduate level training, including specific training in particular areas of specialty, such as science, math etc at least to the level of a university undergrad?


I have mixed feelings on this. On the one hand it would be excellent to make it into a profession and there are moves toward in Australia under the various state systems (e.g. NSW Institute of Teachers). Indeed one of the things that research suggests is a large disappointment for teachers is the poor manner in which they are perceived by the community (in the words of one teacher she felt that the community saw teachers as "necessary but largely incompetent"). Raising teachers to a true profession would go some way to alleviate this.

However, one must be careful as teaching is in a delicate position. 1. Many countries face significant teacher shortages in the next few years particularly in regional areas and in particular subjects (science and math off the top of my head). 2. UK government stats suggest teaching is currently the most stressful vocation. 3. The majority of new teachers are replacements not for those who have retired but for those who have left due to health or well-being problems, stress, or decisions to try other career paths. Indeed the turnover in the first 5 years of teaching is truly remarkable and up around the 50% mark.

As you can see any change that reduces the inflow of new teachers either by making it a less attractive option, reducing the pool of potential education students, or extends the training may increase any current shortages. In addition, any professional development requirements that are a) compulsory, b) time consuming, and c) of limited utility risks losing those already in the vocation.
Image

Spinozasgalt: "And how come no one ever sigs me?"
User avatar
Lazar
 
Posts: 2280
Age: 37
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#23  Postby Lazar » Mar 31, 2010 7:46 pm

mmmcheezy wrote:
Honestly, I thought that was the way it already was, so I'm pretty appalled that it's not. I don't know a great deal about what kind of requirements are in place for teachers, and it's obvious that they're not stringent enough. I think that's a reasonable idea.


The requirements are not really that soft. University degree, practical experience from hellish practicals, and detailed professional development requirements (going from beginning teacher to professionally competent (the term for when you are not a baby teacher anymore) in Australia is pretty heavy). All teacher must also show ongoing professional development in many places in the world.
Image

Spinozasgalt: "And how come no one ever sigs me?"
User avatar
Lazar
 
Posts: 2280
Age: 37
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#24  Postby Warren Dew » Mar 31, 2010 7:48 pm

Shrunk wrote:What do you think of that idea I suggested above: Making teaching into a profession that pays like medicine or law but also requires postgraduate level training, including specific training in particular areas of specialty, such as science, math etc at least to the level of a university undergrad?

I think an undergraduate degree in the subject being taught should be sufficient. Hopefully people don't get undergraduate degrees in biology without knowing about evolution.
User avatar
Warren Dew
 
Posts: 5550
Age: 61
Male

Country: Somerville, MA, USA
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#25  Postby cursuswalker » Mar 31, 2010 7:56 pm

An idea: start them off on antibiotic resistance and let that bed in.

Who knows, they might catch a clue from that.
Image http://www.caerabred.org/

Space Corps Directive 723. 'Terraformers are expressly forbidden from recreating Swindon.'
User avatar
cursuswalker
 
Posts: 3311
Age: 54
Male

Country: England
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#26  Postby byofrcs » Mar 31, 2010 7:57 pm

Warren Dew wrote:
Shrunk wrote:What do you think of that idea I suggested above: Making teaching into a profession that pays like medicine or law but also requires postgraduate level training, including specific training in particular areas of specialty, such as science, math etc at least to the level of a university undergrad?

I think an undergraduate degree in the subject being taught should be sufficient. Hopefully people don't get undergraduate degrees in biology without knowing about evolution.


Well they could but they could imagine that all the little arrows,



e.g. HCl + H2O → H3O+ + Cl is the finger of the "Holy Spirit".

Then it is a consistent set of worldviews. I mean *someone* must be moving all those electrons around. Causality and all that.
In America the battle is between common cents distorted by profits and common sense distorted by prophets.
User avatar
byofrcs
RS Donator
 
Name: Lincoln Phipps
Posts: 7906
Age: 57
Male

Country: Tax, sleep, identity ?
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#27  Postby cakrit » Mar 31, 2010 10:17 pm

byofrcs wrote:
Well they could but they could imagine that all the little arrows,



e.g. HCl + H2O → H3O+ + Cl is the finger of the "Holy Spirit".

Then it is a consistent set of worldviews. I mean *someone* must be moving all those electrons around. Causality and all that.


:rofl:
"Those who seek should not stop seeking until they find. When they find, they will be disturbed".
Jesus
User avatar
cakrit
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 230
Age: 45
Male

Greece (gr)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#28  Postby Tyrannical » Apr 01, 2010 7:55 am

My HS Biology teacher went to a very conservative Berean Baptist Church, and he had no problem teaching evolution.
Good fences make good neighbors
User avatar
Tyrannical
Banned Troll
 
Posts: 6708
Male

United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#29  Postby Varangian » Apr 01, 2010 9:16 am

Warren Dew wrote:
Shrunk wrote:What do you think of that idea I suggested above: Making teaching into a profession that pays like medicine or law but also requires postgraduate level training, including specific training in particular areas of specialty, such as science, math etc at least to the level of a university undergrad?

I think an undergraduate degree in the subject being taught should be sufficient. Hopefully people don't get undergraduate degrees in biology without knowing about evolution.


Depends on their teachers... ;)
Image

"Bunch together a group of people deliberately chosen for strong religious feelings,
and you have a practical guarantee of dark morbidities." - H.P. Lovecraft
User avatar
Varangian
RS Donator
 
Name: Björn
Posts: 7298
Age: 56
Male

Country: Sweden
Sweden (se)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#30  Postby Shrunk » Apr 01, 2010 12:32 pm

Varangian wrote:
Warren Dew wrote:
I think an undergraduate degree in the subject being taught should be sufficient. Hopefully people don't get undergraduate degrees in biology without knowing about evolution.


Depends on their teachers... ;)


I doubt it's at all common for university level instructors to be ignorant of evolution. Outside of evangelical clown colleges like Liberty "University", of course.
"A community is infinitely more brutalised by the habitual employment of punishment than it is by the occasional occurrence of crime." -Oscar Wilde
User avatar
Shrunk
 
Posts: 26170
Age: 56
Male

Country: Canada
Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#31  Postby Varangian » Apr 01, 2010 12:36 pm

Shrunk wrote:
Varangian wrote:
Warren Dew wrote:
I think an undergraduate degree in the subject being taught should be sufficient. Hopefully people don't get undergraduate degrees in biology without knowing about evolution.


Depends on their teachers... ;)


I doubt it's at all common for university level instructors to be ignorant of evolution. Outside of evangelical clown colleges like Liberty "University", of course.


Yeah, but it's one thing to know about evolution, and another to teach about it. A creationist university professor could have the "it's just one theory" approach. Still, I guess most legit universities have competent departments.
Image

"Bunch together a group of people deliberately chosen for strong religious feelings,
and you have a practical guarantee of dark morbidities." - H.P. Lovecraft
User avatar
Varangian
RS Donator
 
Name: Björn
Posts: 7298
Age: 56
Male

Country: Sweden
Sweden (se)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#32  Postby Paul G » Apr 01, 2010 12:40 pm

byofrcs wrote:As a European then I'm very pleased that educationalists in the US are vacillating on teaching fiction. Given for the next 50 years there is going to be a shitstorm of money to be made in genetic-based biotech, that teachers educate US students to think God-did-it pretty well hands that pie to the rest of us on a plate.

Yeah Florida. God really really did it and in 6 days. :dance:


Maybe they'll come around once they realise they're missing out on the $$$$, it's the US after all.
User avatar
Paul G
 
Name: Beef Joint
Posts: 9836
Age: 38
Male

England (eng)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#33  Postby Shrunk » Apr 01, 2010 1:24 pm

Varangian wrote:
Yeah, but it's one thing to know about evolution, and another to teach about it. A creationist university professor could have the "it's just one theory" approach. Still, I guess most legit universities have competent departments.


There are no creationist professors, remember? They all get "Expelled." :grin:
"A community is infinitely more brutalised by the habitual employment of punishment than it is by the occasional occurrence of crime." -Oscar Wilde
User avatar
Shrunk
 
Posts: 26170
Age: 56
Male

Country: Canada
Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#34  Postby MoonLit » Apr 01, 2010 6:16 pm

Seriously fucked up. You can't really teach or even understand biology without Evolution as well.
Image Image Image Image
Click the eggs please!
User avatar
MoonLit
RS Donator
 
Name: Andi
Posts: 3417
Age: 32
Female

Country: Peyton, CO
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#35  Postby NineOneFour » Apr 02, 2010 11:13 pm

chairman bill wrote:I see evolution as a foundational issue in understanding biology. Rejecting it because of the writings of some Bronze Age goat-herders is far from a scientific, critical analysis. Ergo, they are not fit to teach science.


Their immediate resignation and suicide would be useful.
Citizen of the (future) People's Social Democratic Republic of Cascadia.
cascadianow.org

For help managing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), go here. I am able to manage it, and so can you.
User avatar
NineOneFour
 
Name: Yes, I'm an asshole.
Posts: 20906
Age: 51
Male

Country: Cascadia
Jolly Roger (arr)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#36  Postby Lazar » Apr 03, 2010 12:05 am

NineOneFour wrote:
chairman bill wrote:I see evolution as a foundational issue in understanding biology. Rejecting it because of the writings of some Bronze Age goat-herders is far from a scientific, critical analysis. Ergo, they are not fit to teach science.


Their immediate resignation and suicide would be useful.


:what:
Image

Spinozasgalt: "And how come no one ever sigs me?"
User avatar
Lazar
 
Posts: 2280
Age: 37
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#37  Postby MattHunX » Apr 05, 2010 7:45 am

cakrit wrote:http://ecographica.blogspot.com/2010/03/views-of-biology-teachers-towards.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+ResearchBloggingAllEnglish+(Research+Blogging+-+English+-+All+Topics)&utm_content=Google+Reader

A Few of the Findings:
20% of Florida’s biology teachers are NOT COMFORTABLE with even INCLUDING evolution as a required science standard
17% of the teachers felt that biology COULD be taught and understood WITHOUT teaching evolution
17% DISAGREED that the earth is at least 4 billion years old (34% of those that disagreed believed that the earth is only between 4,000 and 40,000 years old)
34% felt that believing in God MEANS rejecting evolution
72% of the respondents reported that they HAD NEVER BEEN criticized by other teachers or school administrators in regards to HOW they taught evolution
44% of the teachers indicated that their teaching of evolution HAS BEEN criticized by students or parents


How can someone be allowed to be a biology teacher when they don't believe in evolution? Is anyone fighting to get laws passed against this? Creationists are using all their might to make creationism accepted in schools and - thankfully - have not succeeded yet. Isn't it time someone fought back so that these ignorant fools can be relieved of duty?


The question is, how are they able to get a degree? Who is (ir)responsible for that anyway? Who on Earth allows these infantile pests to get any sort of qualifications!? :nono:
User avatar
MattHunX
 
Posts: 10947

Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#38  Postby MattHunX » Apr 05, 2010 7:50 am

NineOneFour wrote:
chairman bill wrote:I see evolution as a foundational issue in understanding biology. Rejecting it because of the writings of some Bronze Age goat-herders is far from a scientific, critical analysis. Ergo, they are not fit to teach science.


Their immediate resignation and suicide would be useful.


AMEN,to THAT!!! :thumbup: :cheers:

No need for them to have any kind of off-springs as stupid and deluded as they are. Well, they could turn out to be atheist, but that's not a strong possibility. But, pests like these not having any off-springs at all, is a good way to outnumber them on the long run. Strong possibility of a secular Earth.
User avatar
MattHunX
 
Posts: 10947

Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#39  Postby cursuswalker » Apr 07, 2010 7:36 pm

I think English teachers should be able to object to teaching a language with its roots in imperialism.

Fair enough?
Image http://www.caerabred.org/

Space Corps Directive 723. 'Terraformers are expressly forbidden from recreating Swindon.'
User avatar
cursuswalker
 
Posts: 3311
Age: 54
Male

Country: England
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: Florida biology teachers not comfortable teaching evolut

#40  Postby Lazar » Apr 07, 2010 8:00 pm

MattHunX wrote:
NineOneFour wrote:
chairman bill wrote:I see evolution as a foundational issue in understanding biology. Rejecting it because of the writings of some Bronze Age goat-herders is far from a scientific, critical analysis. Ergo, they are not fit to teach science.


Their immediate resignation and suicide would be useful.


AMEN,to THAT!!! :thumbup: :cheers:

No need for them to have any kind of off-springs as stupid and deluded as they are. Well, they could turn out to be atheist, but that's not a strong possibility. But, pests like these not having any off-springs at all, is a good way to outnumber them on the long run. Strong possibility of a secular Earth.


Horse shit what vitriolic nonsense.

Now back on topic recent research disturbingly suggests that up to 50% of pre service teachers think kids should be taught creationism either in the "Teach the controversy" mode or even in place of evolution. Importantly, having took a college level course in biology did not make a difference. Strong misconceptions about evolution were present as was a general lack of understanding of evolution. Interestingly, a fairly small percentage of teachers suggested evolution conflicted with their religious beliefs. Taken together I think this suggests that much of the fault can be laid squarely at the feet of poor teacher training.

Despite considerable focus on evolution knowledge–belief relationships,
little research has targeted populations with strong content backgrounds, such as undergraduate
degrees in biology. This study (1) measured precertified biology and non-biology
teachers’ (n=167) knowledge of evolution and the nature of science; (2) quantified teacher
preferences for the teaching of creationism in schools; (3) examined the associations among
knowledge and belief variables; and (4) contrasted the knowledge and beliefs of prospective
biology teachers with those of non-biology teachers. Methodologically, teacher knowledge
was quantified by using three measures and studied in relation to certification area, selfreported
religiosity, personal conflict concerning science and religion, and completion of
an evolution course. We found (1) generally low levels of knowledge of evolution and
the nature of science—and high misconception magnitudes—in both biology and nonbiology
teachers; (2) comparable antievolutionary positions in biology and non-biology
teachers: nearly half of the teachers in both groups advocated for the inclusion of creationism
in school; (3) weak association between knowledge and preference/belief variables;
and (4) no difference in preference for teaching creationism between those teachers who
had taken an evolution course and those who had not. Overall, biology and non-biology
teachers were found to display “mixed” and “novice naturalistic” evolutionary reasoning
patterns.


Nehm, Kim, & Sheppard (2009). Academic Preparation in Biology and Advocacy for Teaching Evolution: Biology Versus
Non-Biology Teachers. Science Education, vol 93, pp. 1122-1146.
Image

Spinozasgalt: "And how come no one ever sigs me?"
User avatar
Lazar
 
Posts: 2280
Age: 37
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

PreviousNext

Return to Parenting & Education

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 1 guest