Coal critter

The accumulation of small heritable changes within populations over time.

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Coal critter

#1  Postby Macdoc » Dec 16, 2019 1:22 pm

Image

Ancient 'coal dragon' is now the oldest parareptile ever found

Carbonodraco lundi, which lived more than 306 million years ago, unseats fossil found by P.E.I. boy

Emily Chung · CBC News · Posted: Dec 16, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago


https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/carb ... -1.5394231
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Re: Coal critter

#2  Postby Svartalf » Dec 16, 2019 1:34 pm

must be pretty early... IIRC my dinosaur period as a child, there were plenty reptilians in the carboniferous era... I always remember the dimetrodon with its big back sail.
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Re: Coal critter

#3  Postby Ironclad » Dec 16, 2019 4:29 pm

That isn't a dinosaur, fwiw. And we are a relative, by some gymnastics. It was also a childhood favourite of mine :)
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Re: Coal critter

#4  Postby Svartalf » Dec 16, 2019 4:52 pm

yeah, I know, but then again I've always been a big fan of trilobites... "dinosaurs" was just a wrapword for the larger category of interesting prehistoric animals
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Re: Coal critter

#5  Postby newolder » Dec 16, 2019 5:32 pm

... The animal, which was about 25 centimetres long from nose to tail, lived more than 306 million years ago during the Carboniferous Period...

From the image & description, the title 'coal dragon' does seem a bit grandiose.

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Re: Coal critter

#6  Postby Macdoc » Dec 16, 2019 8:09 pm

nah



they are cute
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Re: Coal critter

#7  Postby newolder » Dec 16, 2019 8:22 pm

^ You've supplied a modern, living "Forest Dragon" (something with a frilled back and that lives in a forest) in defence of the moniker of the fossilised "coal dragon" (a smooth-backed beast that lived alongside ferns) with the tag line, "they are cute". What is the disagreement with my post you think you are having here? :dunno:
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Re: Coal critter

#8  Postby Macdoc » Dec 16, 2019 8:57 pm

There are Komodo dragons
Bearded dragons
even a dragon millipede.

You've been reading too much Anne McCaffrey :coffee:
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Re: Coal critter

#9  Postby newolder » Dec 16, 2019 9:39 pm

Why do you think the Carboniferous era beast wandered about in coalfields?

If none is too much reading of A. McC. then I'm guilty as charged.
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Re: Coal critter

#10  Postby Ironclad » Dec 16, 2019 10:18 pm

Svartalf wrote:yeah, I know, but then again I've always been a big fan of trilobites... "dinosaurs" was just a wrapword for the larger category of interesting prehistoric animals
Agreed. :)
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Re: Coal critter

#11  Postby laklak » Dec 17, 2019 3:26 am

Dinosaurs. Jesus rode them. Hell, wouldn't you if you could get away with it? I fucking would and no mistake.
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Re: Coal critter

#12  Postby Macdoc » Dec 17, 2019 5:20 am

A unique fossil that is "literally a black piece of coal" found in the dump of a 19th-century coal mine


which came from swamps that eventually became coal ...argue with the authors...they started it :coffee:
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Re: Coal critter

#13  Postby newolder » Dec 17, 2019 9:53 am

Macdoc wrote:
A unique fossil that is "literally a black piece of coal" found in the dump of a 19th-century coal mine


which came from swamps that eventually became coal ...argue with the authors...they started it :coffee:


I'll argue with the contrarian who responds, thanks. The naming convention here is uniquely stupid since it implies that all fossils found in lumps of coal be named coal X (which, of course, they are not) and we know the formation of coal shows peaks in both Carbonferous and Cenozoic eras that are separated by vast time intervals.
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