Dyslexia

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Dyslexia

#1  Postby HAJiME » Dec 11, 2010 1:28 pm

Just wanted to see who else has Dyslexia and their experiences with it.

I don't think my writing is too bad, and whilst my reading could be much better it's not too bad, but I still struggle with it.
With reading; I'm slow, the page appears to glow (especially the holes in letters), my eyes jump around the page confusedly, I find it difficult to find the next line of text in a block of text, if there are images in the text they confuse me because my eye wants to look at them the whole time, I assume what words are going to say and often get them wrong.

I have trouble with the relationship of spoken and written words. For example, I'm pretty sure that where I live people pronounce chimney "chimley" and so for years and years I thought it was indeed chimley and when I saw chimney written down I was like, wtf is this word...? I think a lot of my trouble is that people do not speak clearly or properly where I live in South London.

It frustrates me that words are not spelt how they sound to no end. I get angry about it. I'd be fine if everything was phonetic and everyone spoke properly.

Why is atheist ei when the rule says "i before e except after c"? :(

I struggle with maths ridiculously. I find it hard to think of numbers as abstract things. 1 HAS to mean 1 thing. It can't just be 1. That makes no sense to me. So obviously when you take larger numbers I can't mentally keep track of them and it becomes impossible.
I cannot do anything except adding. When I need to subtract, I take the lower number and count up to the higher number. I cannot understand how subtracting can possibly be easier than this, but everyone thinks I'm mad.
I still can't read an analogue clock face. Well, I can, but it takes SO long that by the time I have it's changed time, so it's pointless.

My memory is appalling. (Appalling is one of those words I just can't remember how to spell, despite using it all the time. It should be "appauling" given how people pronounce it and even when I do remember the u, I forget it has 2 l's. Sigh.) I think poor memory is why everything else is so hard. I forget everything. It's frustrating for me and those around me.

I've been diagnosed 3 times and always received support. Recently, I received a Macbook Pro, printer, scanner, dictaphone, software and some other stuff for free. (Don't see how any of it helps with my dyslexia on my uni course since dyslexia doesn't effect my ability to illustrate in the slightest, but I shan't say no.)

How does dyslexia affect you?
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Re: Dyslexia

#2  Postby pilot » Dec 11, 2010 9:36 pm

Mild compared to you, in my case but not diagnosed until my thirties and is why I failed academically to get into higher education. It results in poor spelling (saved by word processors) primarily difficulty in linking sounds to letters. Most significantly it prevented me writing with any confidence until the word processor came along. The word processor (microsoft word) allowed me to flow but then go back and sort the incomprehensible mess out fairly easily. General I over compensate to avoid misunderstanding by over describing and unnecessary detail. It seems to get worse at stressful times, but surprisingly I get more of a flow going with words when I'm tired.
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Re: Dyslexia

#3  Postby fuzzyom » Dec 12, 2010 3:49 am

I was first diagnosed with dyslexia in school then later in college, doesn't sound like mine is as bad as yours, but I can relate to many of the points you raise.

HAJiME wrote:my eyes jump around the page confusedly, I find it difficult to find the next line of text in a block of text,


I find it very easy to lose track of where I am when reading and will start the same paragraph three or so times in a row, also very easily distracted and will lose my place again.

HAJiME wrote:I have trouble with the relationship of spoken and written words. For example, I'm pretty sure that where I live people pronounce chimney "chimley" and so for years and years I thought it was indeed chimley and when I saw chimney written down I was like, wtf is this word...?
It frustrates me that words are not spelt how they sound to no end. I get angry about it. I'd be fine if everything was phonetic and everyone spoke properly.


Pretty much agree but think it's not so much that words aren't spelt phonetically but it's that written english seems to use multiply phonetic systems on top of each other, so when you try to sound out a word you have no idea which system to use.

HAJiME wrote:Why is atheist ei when the rule says "i before e except after c"? :(


I've never tried to prove it but I'm fairly confident that every rule in written english will have at least one exception to it.

HAJiME wrote:I struggle with maths ridiculously.


HAJiME wrote:When I need to subtract, I take the lower number and count up to the higher number. I cannot understand how subtracting can possibly be easier than this, but everyone thinks I'm mad.


I was ok with maths, did alright in school with it but subtraction does not come naturally to me and I could never learn the times tables by heart.

HAJiME wrote:My memory is appalling. (Appalling is one of those words I just can't remember how to spell, despite using it all the time. It should be "appauling" given how people pronounce it and even when I do remember the u, I forget it has 2 l's. Sigh.) I think poor memory is why everything else is so hard. I forget everything. It's frustrating for me and those around me.


I think bad memory goes with the territory of dyslexia and as for if a word has a double letter in it or not I'm hopeless, there's a few words where I can see a use for it but most of the time it seems unnecessary. Which reminds me 'necessary' gah I hate this word, every time, it's does the c or s go at the front, are they both double letters or not and why the hell is there a need for two different letters in one word that both make the same sound when spoken.

HAJiME wrote:I've been diagnosed 3 times and always received support. Recently, I received a Macbook Pro, printer, scanner, dictaphone, software and some other stuff for free. (Don't see how any of it helps with my dyslexia on my uni course since dyslexia doesn't effect my ability to illustrate in the slightest, but I shan't say no.)


I believe the dictaphone is so you don't have to take notes, never really got into using one myself so no idea how useful they are.
When it comes to essay writing or a dissertation, the spell check can be a good learning aid but only if you do the spell check once you've finished writing, as this highlights words you'll be using often and getting 'wrong' but doing the check at the end means you get to see the correction in repetition and at least in my case it helped me to remember the accepted spelling for next time. If you do it as your going along though I find I don't remember it as well if at all.
Also assuming you can't already, I'd suggest finding a program to teach you to touch type, again I can only speak from my own experience but it's really useful, as it lets you spill all the ideas out of your head onto the page where you can sort them out later.

HAJiME wrote:How does dyslexia affect you?


Spelling wise in addition to the double letter thing, b, d, p get mixed up.
I don't automatically know left from right and then when I look at my hands to see which one makes the L shape with finger and thumb I'll forget which way round the L goes.
Whilst I now like reading I'm still quite slow at it.
Also I don't know if it's just that I can't hear the difference but to me 'fink' and 'think' sound no different when spoken, but I remember a teacher trying to convince me that they do sound different.

It was more of a problem in school as my spelling age was about three or four years below my actual age but now I'm in my mid 30's that's less of an issue, it does still stress me out though when I have to fill in forms by hand as no matter what I'll spell something wrong or put lower case where they want capitals.
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Re: Dyslexia

#4  Postby Ironclad » Dec 12, 2010 4:19 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_before_E_except_after_C

A pretty old mnemonic to help children spell that has been upgraded, i - before - e...
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Re: Dyslexia

#5  Postby HAJiME » Dec 12, 2010 5:39 am

I've never tried to prove it but I'm fairly confident that every rule in written english will have at least one exception to it.

Well everything has exceptions, but the point is WHY is it ei and not ie? Why aren't they all just the same? Is there any actual legitimate reason?

Why is the "ough" combo used to make about a million different sounds? In the place name Loughborough it's used twice and makes different sounds in the same word! WHY? WHY? It makes no sense.

Do normal people just remember every single spelling of every word? They must do, since thee is no way of working any of it out.
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Re: Dyslexia

#6  Postby jodiebug » Dec 12, 2010 6:05 am

HAJiME wrote:
I've never tried to prove it but I'm fairly confident that every rule in written english will have at least one exception to it.

Well everything has exceptions, but the point is WHY is it ei and not ie? Why aren't they all just the same? Is there any actual legitimate reason?

Why is the "ough" combo used to make about a million different sounds? In the place name Loughborough it's used twice and makes different sounds in the same word! WHY? WHY? It makes no sense.

Do normal people just remember every single spelling of every word? They must do, since thee is no way of working any of it out.


I think it's because it's taken from Greek.
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Re: Dyslexia

#7  Postby jodiebug » Dec 12, 2010 6:15 am

I've suspected I might have a mild form of dyslexia for a while. I don't have a problem with reading or spelling, per se, but I don't think I read in the same way as other people.

My real problem is with left and right. As a child, I wrote right to left as often as I wrote left to right, and I was hard pressed to tell the difference if anyone brought it up. If I see a sentence written backward, I have read it before I've realized there's anything different about it. I constantly confuse left and right, even though I'm right-handed. It just doesn't make sense to me that one side is left and one side is right, but when you turn around, they've switched. I know it sounds silly, but it's just never been intuitive to me.

It affects my math skills because I can't read the shorthand fluidly. I reverse the orientations of signs and numbers and mess up my calculations. I'm not bad at abstract math, where I have an idea of what's happening to guide my thoughts, but I fail at number-crunching.
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Re: Dyslexia

#8  Postby The Damned » Dec 12, 2010 8:28 am

I'm good at mathsish. But for me the memory thing is a real problem, what's the difference between me and a computer?

You only have to punch information into a computer once.

Differentiation between hemispheres of the brain is one reason for dyspraxia which often comes with dyslexia, I can't balance worth a damn. On the plus side I am pretty ambidextrous and I read upside down as well as the right way up.
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Re: Dyslexia

#9  Postby HAJiME » Dec 12, 2010 7:30 pm

I've just thought of something else I do when reading.

If I come across (I thought that had two c's in it) a name in a piece of text, I don't read it out in my head... I ackowledge that it's a name and remember the visual word but never actually read it. I assume it's because names are often unfamiliar.

But I was just telling my non-dyslexic friend this and they say they used to do it when younger.
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Re: Dyslexia

#10  Postby jaydot » Jan 05, 2011 8:40 pm

ii don't have any trouble devouring the written word, but i have experienced words 'dancing on the page' when my eyes have become too tired to do more work. as a result, i was fascinated to hear what kara tointon had to say on the subject of dyslexia in a bbc documentary. far from being lazy, as her teacher accused, she was told that she worked her eyes much harder than people without dyslexia because she concentrated so much.

she was invited to join a group of dyslexic children being taught using methods alternative to traditional teaching and had a lot of fun with them. it seemed to have helped a lot too.

another aid was tinted spectacles. in her case green was considered the most effective at keeping the words still on the page and enabling her to read more comfortably.

for many years dyslexia was dismissed as a lazyness issue, or bad teaching. only in recent years has it been recognised as a bona fide condition.

those of you who suffer dyslexia, however mild, i would urge to seek professional input to see if there are aids which would help you and if you can get to see 'don't call me stupid' i recommend you do. although already sympathetic, this programme gave me greater insight into an annoying and debilitating handicap.

oh, and console yourselves with this snippet; dyslexics are, in general, of above average intelligence. :)
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Re: Dyslexia

#11  Postby HAJiME » Jan 05, 2011 9:03 pm

That documentary was pretty fab, I agree.

In the 2 tests I've had for Dyslexia, I've been told that my spelling and mathematics etc is "low average", which concerns me... Because it's shit, and if that is "average" then most people really are thick as shit. :/ It's the discrepancies between things I'm good at (I score exceptionally high at perceptive organisation, in the top 1% of the population :)) and things I'm poor at that screams dyslexia, along with symptoms such as visual stress, bad short term memory, etc.
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Re: Dyslexia

#12  Postby paceetrate » Jan 06, 2011 8:39 am

HAJiME wrote:
Why is atheist ei when the rule says "i before e except after c"? :(


Just to clear this up, it's because "atheist" isn't just a word with an i and an e in it. It's because it's a suffix (-ist) attached to a word "the" from "theos" meaning "god". With "a-" being the prefix meaning a negative. So it's: a (no) the (god) ist (person). "Person who does not believe in gods." Or something like that. ;P

Anyway, I was thought to be dyslexic when I was younger, although I was never tested. Mainly because I was forever getting "d" and "b" messed up. The only time I have a hard time reading now is when I'm really tired. :P

However, I seem to have a lot of the problems with numbers that I hear dyslexics have with written words, so I can sympathize a bit. Like you said with the not-reading-names thing, I almost never read numbers when written in text unless it's a small number, like 4 or 20. Anything more than two digits and have to slow my reading down tremendously to actually "read" it, and the more digits the worse it gets. If it's a really big number, I'll just skip it entirely and be like "really big number of blah blah blah" and keep reading.
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Re: Dyslexia

#13  Postby HAJiME » Jan 06, 2011 12:17 pm

paceetrate wrote:
HAJiME wrote:
Why is atheist ei when the rule says "i before e except after c"? :(


Just to clear this up, it's because "atheist" isn't just a word with an i and an e in it. It's because it's a suffix (-ist) attached to a word "the" from "theos" meaning "god". With "a-" being the prefix meaning a negative. So it's: a (no) the (god) ist (person). "Person who does not believe in gods." Or something like that. ;P

Anyway, I was thought to be dyslexic when I was younger, although I was never tested. Mainly because I was forever getting "d" and "b" messed up. The only time I have a hard time reading now is when I'm really tired. :P

However, I seem to have a lot of the problems with numbers that I hear dyslexics have with written words, so I can sympathize a bit. Like you said with the not-reading-names thing, I almost never read numbers when written in text unless it's a small number, like 4 or 20. Anything more than two digits and have to slow my reading down tremendously to actually "read" it, and the more digits the worse it gets. If it's a really big number, I'll just skip it entirely and be like "really big number of blah blah blah" and keep reading.

Apparently the i before e except after c rule is redundant because there are more exceptions to it than... er, followers.

As for numbers, I do the same thing, but never thought of it before. I have a huge issue with numbers in general as I cannot seem to see them as abstract things. But I've long found that maths is worthless to my daily life. Unlike reading and writing, which present problems daily, everyone carries a calculator in their pocket on their mobile phone. I have rarely had to use maths since school where my phone calculator was not of help. My phone doesn't have a dyslexic friendly dictionary on it, though. Calculators almost always help, dictionaries only help if you know the MOST of the word you're looking for and I often don't. Not to mention that the book format is something hat drives most dyslexics to despair. When I was at school, more emphasis was put on maths than English, yet quite frankly mathematics is worthless to me and can piss off.
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Re: Dyslexia

#14  Postby Doubtdispelled » Jan 07, 2011 11:29 am

I'm not dyslexic but I spent 3 years teaching my dyslexic son to read fluently, so I learnt a fair bit about the problems people face when they have trouble with the written word.

We used Toe-by-Toe, which was recommended by the Ed Psych who evaluated Alex when he was 8. At the time he had a reading age of 6.5 and was falling well behind his peers at school, by the time we had finished (and it seemed as though we never would!) he was 11, and had a reading age of 15. It also improved his spelling, not to mention his self-esteem.

Hajime, I'm glad to see you are getting help. Has anyone recommended you try coloured overlays for reading, seeing an optometrist to eliminate the possibility of sight inconsistencies being a factor (as with my son - his eyes do not 'track' consistently), or for that matter, Toe-by-Toe itself or something similar?
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Re: Dyslexia

#15  Postby Fallible » Jan 07, 2011 11:52 am

Numbers are my problem. It is numbers which dance around on the page. Sometimes digits will disappear from a sum completely. I can't subtract worth a damn if one of the digits I'm trying to subtract is higher - eg 345-159 - without a hell of a lot of time or effort. Mental arithmetic - forget it. I could do it if you gave me a thousand years, but I don't have a thousand years. Multiplication - niet. Division - absolutely niet. Algebra I could kind of do...possibly because it had letters in it. For me, my problem with numbers is completely exclusive to arithmetic - ie. I have no problem telling the time or reading bus or train timetables. I did well at all other subjects at school without exception, the grade difference in my GCSEs between everything else and maths being 4-5 whole grades, and that includes Chemistry. I did drop Physics when I was 13 though, because I could not understand simple (I am told they're simple) concepts such as velocity and displacement. I was slow to pick up methods in maths, even basic stuff like 'carrying over'. My brain cannot cope with mathematical concepts at all.
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Re: Dyslexia

#16  Postby Doubtdispelled » Jan 07, 2011 12:03 pm

There's a name for it, Fall!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyscalculia
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Re: Dyslexia

#17  Postby Fallible » Jan 07, 2011 12:08 pm

Yep. I've not been tested, but I became aware of the term at some point in the last decade or so.
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Re: Dyslexia

#18  Postby newolder » Jan 07, 2011 1:46 pm

read topic title as dailysex :doh:
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Re: Dyslexia

#19  Postby HAJiME » Jan 07, 2011 4:08 pm

Doubtdispelled wrote:
Hajime, I'm glad to see you are getting help. Has anyone recommended you try coloured overlays for reading, seeing an optometrist to eliminate the possibility of sight inconsistencies being a factor (as with my son - his eyes do not 'track' consistently), or for that matter, Toe-by-Toe itself or something similar?

I'm not sure the overlays make too much difference. I know that it's easier for me to read in dim light. I have the backlight on my mac on the second bar, I dunno how unusual that is.

I need to sort out an appointment at an optometrist really. It seems a little redundant now though, but uni will pay for it if I go whilst at uni.

I've never heard of Toe-by-Toe to be honest.

The single greatest help for me has been audiobooks. Listening to them alongside reading seems to ingrain written words to the sound they make better than anything else and I only wish I'd had this as a kid. So, I can recommend that.

It also took me SO LONG to find books that interested me enough to read them for longer than 10 mins. I read The Selfish Gene cover to cover in the first year of uni in the space of about 2 months, which is mind-blowing for someone like me.
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Re: Dyslexia

#20  Postby HAJiME » Jan 07, 2011 4:20 pm

Fallible wrote:Numbers are my problem. It is numbers which dance around on the page. Sometimes digits will disappear from a sum completely. I can't subtract worth a damn if one of the digits I'm trying to subtract is higher - eg 345-159 - without a hell of a lot of time or effort. Mental arithmetic - forget it. I could do it if you gave me a thousand years, but I don't have a thousand years. Multiplication - niet. Division - absolutely niet. Algebra I could kind of do...possibly because it had letters in it. For me, my problem with numbers is completely exclusive to arithmetic - ie. I have no problem telling the time or reading bus or train timetables. I did well at all other subjects at school without exception, the grade difference in my GCSEs between everything else and maths being 4-5 whole grades, and that includes Chemistry. I did drop Physics when I was 13 though, because I could not understand simple (I am told they're simple) concepts such as velocity and displacement. I was slow to pick up methods in maths, even basic stuff like 'carrying over'. My brain cannot cope with mathematical concepts at all.

I don't think I'm as bad with numbers as this, but this certainly sounds familiar.

I can't do anything other than adding, even on paper. I find ways around that though. People are always baffled with how I subtract, but for example... Say I need to do 7-5. I'd count on my fingers up from the five... So the answer is 2. I cannot comprehend why anyone would do it any other way.

People always taught me ways of doing maths, but my issue was I couldn't remember what rules did what.
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