A lovely lady explaining English accents and dialects.

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Re: A lovely lady explaining English accents and dialects.

#41  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Aug 19, 2019 10:23 am

Spearthrower wrote:
Thomas Eshuis wrote:
I fear I am not making my point clearly enough.
I am not talking about a difference in pronunciation in the from of a different word stress.
I am talking about how changing a noun into an adverb changes the pronunciation of a single vowel to a different vowel.


Aye, that's why I gave examples of schwa sounds: it's a different vowel.

I see.

Spearthrower wrote:
Thomas Eshuis wrote:And that, while American English does remain consistent in using a -y sound, the British English pronunciation uses a short -i sound in the verb, but changes it to a longer -y sound in the adverb form of the same word.


Honestly, I don't think it's actually true. Perhaps in some regional accents... I don't know as British pronunciation is bizarre - although I'd assume that it would be consistent across both forms, but in the South, it's DINasty, diNAStic - no difference in the 'i' sound.

Or phonetically:

/ˈdɪnəsti/
/dɪˈnæstɪk/

https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries. ... ?q=dynasty
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries. ... q=dynastic


You're probably right, I was just going by what the Cambridge dictionary claimed about the differences in pronunciation.
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
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Thomas Eshuis
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