Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

Examples of funny and/or annoying mississpellings, and other grammatical errors

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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#121  Postby laklak » Mar 10, 2019 3:46 am

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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#122  Postby romansh » Mar 10, 2019 7:42 am

don't get me started wrote:Romansch, I don't get to interact with many speakers of Latvian. I'm wondering if you have any insights into ways things are done differently in that language to the way they are done in English (the 'canceling out' process notwithstanding :) )

My formal Latvian is terrible … I just spoke it at home. I can get by in everyday situations. When visiting relatives there they ask me when I left Latvia … never having lived there makes me sort of chuffed. But when I listen to news in Latvian I literally have to translate which leaves me effectively not understanding what is being said.

Differently? Nothing seriously … other than endings of words have to match … Galds - table, the ending s implies male. Uz galda would translate to on the table.

I have lived longer out of the UK now than elsewhere ... I wonder about my UK English now.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#123  Postby Scot Dutchy » Mar 10, 2019 10:06 am

A problem all long term residents outside the UK have as well. I had a period of almost 20 years of non stop Dutch. I lived in a 100% Dutch world. My Dutch became almost word perfect and very up-market due to colleagues and friends at that time. When I met my Irish wife and she moved into the ex-pat world my English was not good. Now retired my contacts are both Dutch and English but thinking in Dutch is still very much the case. I have to make translations into English often.
I used to do translation work for the Dutch government but it is now too demanding.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#124  Postby The_Piper » Mar 10, 2019 7:08 pm

This one is likely to rile up UKians who think their way of writing things is the best way, even when it's not. :snooty:
We call mathematics math in the US and I've seen, more than twice, non-USians being critical of that. Because mathematics is plural. Ok, that's a bit nitpicky, but reasonable people can agree with that reasoning.
Then the la-dee-da Royal Institution has some splaining to do with this wording:
"What Happens When Maths Goes Wrong?" If maths is thought of as a plural, that wording is wrong and sounds non-Royal institutionie.
Face it, saying maths is no better than dropping the s, and arguably less linguistically correct. The video starts out with "humble pi". Well have some humble pie as well. :snooty:
:teef:

edit- grammer :shifty:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#125  Postby Hermit » Mar 10, 2019 7:33 pm

The_Piper wrote:This one is likely to rile up UKians who think their way of writing things is the best way, even when it's not. :snooty:
We call mathematics math in the US and I've seen, more than twice, non-USians being critical of that. Because mathematics is plural. Ok, that's a bit nitpicky, but reasonable people can agree with that reasoning.
Then the la-dee-da Royal Institution has some splaining to do with this wording:
"What Happens When Maths Goes Wrong?" If maths is thought of as a plural, that wording is wrong and sounds non-Royal institutionie.
Face it, saying maths is no better than dropping the s, and arguably less linguistically correct. The video starts out with "humble pi". Well have some humble pie as well. :snooty:
:teef:

edit- grammer :shifty:

Some words are singular even though they end in 's'. You need not have an advanced degree in linguistics to know that. That's the only news I have for you just now. :mrgreen:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#126  Postby surreptitious57 » Mar 10, 2019 7:49 pm

I prefer the American version simply because its easier to pronounce
I think I might drop the s altogether just for reasons of consistency
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#127  Postby Fallible » Mar 10, 2019 8:02 pm

The_Piper wrote:This one is likely to rile up UKians who think their way of writing things is the best way, even when it's not. :snooty:
We call mathematics math in the US and I've seen, more than twice, non-USians being critical of that. Because mathematics is plural. Ok, that's a bit nitpicky, but reasonable people can agree with that reasoning.
Then the la-dee-da Royal Institution has some splaining to do with this wording:
"What Happens When Maths Goes Wrong?" If maths is thought of as a plural, that wording is wrong and sounds non-Royal institutionie.
Face it, saying maths is no better than dropping the s, and arguably less linguistically correct. The video starts out with "humble pi". Well have some humble pie as well. :snooty:
:teef:

edit- grammer :shifty:


The word can be used as either a singular or a plural noun, so my assumption is that the Royal Institute are using it as a singular noun, and so their question is grammatically correct. :cigar:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#128  Postby aban57 » Mar 10, 2019 8:14 pm

The_Piper wrote:
edit- grammer


That's French for grandmother :D
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#129  Postby The_Piper » Mar 10, 2019 8:28 pm

Hermit wrote:
The_Piper wrote:This one is likely to rile up UKians who think their way of writing things is the best way, even when it's not. :snooty:
We call mathematics math in the US and I've seen, more than twice, non-USians being critical of that. Because mathematics is plural. Ok, that's a bit nitpicky, but reasonable people can agree with that reasoning.
Then the la-dee-da Royal Institution has some splaining to do with this wording:
"What Happens When Maths Goes Wrong?" If maths is thought of as a plural, that wording is wrong and sounds non-Royal institutionie.
Face it, saying maths is no better than dropping the s, and arguably less linguistically correct. The video starts out with "humble pi". Well have some humble pie as well. :snooty:
:teef:

edit- grammer :shifty:

Some words are singular even though they end in 's'. You need not have an advanced degree in linguistics to know that. That's the only news I have for you just now. :mrgreen:

That's my point. Math is at least as suitable a shortened word as maths is.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#130  Postby The_Piper » Mar 10, 2019 8:31 pm

aban57 wrote:
The_Piper wrote:
edit- grammer


That's French for grandmother :D

Hmm, mine was called me'mere/meme. Pronounced muh-may.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#131  Postby Fallible » Mar 10, 2019 8:32 pm

Neither abbreviation is correct or incorrect. You may hear arguments for one being superior to the other, and there are logical cases for both sides. One could argue maths is better because mathematics ends in s, and one could argue math is better because mathematics is just a mass noun that happens to end in s. In any case, English usage is rarely guided by logic, and these usage idiosyncrasies are often arbitrary. If you were raised in a part of the world where people say maths, then maths is correct for you, and the same is of course true of math. Don’t listen to anyone who says otherwise


https://grammarist.com/spelling/math-maths/
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#132  Postby The_Piper » Mar 10, 2019 8:36 pm

surreptitious57 wrote:I prefer the American version simply because its easier to pronounce
I think I might drop the s altogether just for reasons of consistency

I see pronouncing maths being a challenge for someone with a lisp. I just realized that it's odd that someone with a lisp would mispronounce the word lisp. :lol:
Just like the word rhotacism to people who have rhotacism. English is cruel. :teef:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#133  Postby The_Piper » Mar 10, 2019 8:40 pm

Fallible wrote:
Neither abbreviation is correct or incorrect. You may hear arguments for one being superior to the other, and there are logical cases for both sides. One could argue maths is better because mathematics ends in s, and one could argue math is better because mathematics is just a mass noun that happens to end in s. In any case, English usage is rarely guided by logic, and these usage idiosyncrasies are often arbitrary. If you were raised in a part of the world where people say maths, then maths is correct for you, and the same is of course true of math. Don’t listen to anyone who says otherwise


https://grammarist.com/spelling/math-maths/

:nod:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#134  Postby surreptitious57 » Mar 10, 2019 9:01 pm


Steven Wright : whose cruel idea was it for the word lisp to have an s in it ?

I heard this many years ago and just remembered it now

Another one of his : whats another word for a thesaurus ?


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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#135  Postby surreptitious57 » Mar 10, 2019 9:24 pm

I sometimes see / hear wiggle and other tims see / hear wriggle
Unlike math / maths the pronunciation is just as easy either way
I prefer wiggle myself because adding the r is entirely superfluous

Some people say scone [ rhymes with con ] while others say scone [ rhymes with cone ]
It is usually the lower class who say the former and the middle class who say the latter

Some people say Shrewsbury phonetically while others say it as Shroesbury
I say Shrewsbury for reasons of simplicity [ no point in pronouncing it non phonetically ]
I am unaware what the reason for the non phonetic pronunciation is [ it could be class ]

Madgalen College Oxford is pronounced Maudling so is non phonetic
Caius College Oxford is pronounced Keys and so that is another one
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#136  Postby don't get me started » Mar 10, 2019 11:30 pm

romansh wrote:
don't get me started wrote:Romansch, I don't get to interact with many speakers of Latvian. I'm wondering if you have any insights into ways things are done differently in that language to the way they are done in English (the 'canceling out' process notwithstanding :) )

My formal Latvian is terrible … I just spoke it at home. I can get by in everyday situations. When visiting relatives there they ask me when I left Latvia … never having lived there makes me sort of chuffed. But when I listen to news in Latvian I literally have to translate which leaves me effectively not understanding what is being said.

Differently? Nothing seriously … other than endings of words have to match … Galds - table, the ending s implies male. Uz galda would translate to on the table.

I have lived longer out of the UK now than elsewhere ... I wonder about my UK English now.


Thanks for that romansch.
Yeah, this is an interesting point that crops up in several languages. In English, nouns pretty much stay in the same form, whatever part of speech they are performing. The exception is to add an 's' for plurals and (confusingly) an 's for possesive (the apostrophe is of course not hearable in spoken language). Table- Tables - Table's.
Other languages that rely more on inflection than word order have all kinds of variants of noun forms to show things like who is doing the doing, what is being done to, the goal of movement or the origin point of movement, location and a whole lot more.

English now uses prepositions to do some of these functions. On then table...to the table...from the table. The noun stays the same. There is, however, a remnant of an older system.
Nowadays we would probably say something like 'Where are you going (to)?' or 'Where did he come from?' using the same word 'where' for referring to the origin point and the goal. In the past we would have asked. 'Whither goest thou?' and 'Whence came he?' differentiating between goal and origin.

In Russian, the capital of the country is Москва 'Moskva'. But if you want to say 'He went to Moscow' it comes out as 'Он уехал в Москву.' With the city name changed from Moskva to Moskvu, to show goal of movement.
(Google translate tells me something similar happens in Latvian..but I know better than to rely over much on GT :whistle:

Having to pay attention to distinctions that don't really exist in your own language is one of the big stumbling blocks for language learners. Even very proficient Japanese speakers of English have, in my experience, residual problems with countable and uncountable, and singular and plural forms of nouns which just don't exist in Japanese.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#137  Postby Alan B » Mar 11, 2019 2:51 pm

'maths' sounds normal to me (born 'n bred in UK) although I could 'study maths' but 'do the math'. (That's interesting. 'math' came up as a spelling error).

Although in my younger days maths was called Riffmatik... :whistle:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#138  Postby Scot Dutchy » Mar 11, 2019 3:28 pm

Part of the three "R"'s.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#139  Postby felltoearth » Mar 11, 2019 3:50 pm

I had a brit shop teacher, Mr Humphries, who who always imitated when he said “Don’t forget to do yur ‘omeworks.” Homework here, not homeworks.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#140  Postby Alan B » Mar 11, 2019 3:56 pm

What is the origin of 'Recuse'? I seems to be an Americanism. I have no sense of recognition or origin of that word. It seems to be used in the sense of 'to be excused'.
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