Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

Examples of funny and/or annoying mississpellings, and other grammatical errors

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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#61  Postby don't get me started » Feb 28, 2019 10:44 pm

The Japanese, purists though they often are about their own food, become inventive with the cuisines of other lands.

Octopus, sweetcorn and mayonnaise pizza... yep, it's a thing. :yuk:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#62  Postby scott1328 » Mar 01, 2019 2:31 am

don't get me started wrote:Thanks Ironclad and Fallible... I'm glad that you found the content worthwhile.

Rest assured that down the pub on a Friday with my mates and cronies I'm sweary bullshiter and piss-taker, not a finger wagging know-all :drunk:

Back on topic..(kind of)...

A friend who was teaching in the secondary school system in the UK was marking the history projects of his students.
One student may have been deficient in his knowledge of English spelling conventions but was unwittingly insightful about historical realities when he/she wrote.

"The inside of Anglo-Saxon houses were dark and smoky, and there was rough mating on the floor." ;)

I found your post facinating. This forum could do with a lot more of that kind of contribution!
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#63  Postby The_Piper » Mar 01, 2019 3:20 am

don't get me started wrote:The Japanese, purists though they often are about their own food, become inventive with the cuisines of other lands.

Octopus, sweetcorn and mayonnaise pizza... yep, it's a thing. :yuk:

:waah:
Though the corn could be interesting. My Italian grandmother just turned in her grave that I even thought that. :lol:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#64  Postby laklak » Mar 01, 2019 3:35 am

I used to feel bad eating octopus, because they're so smart, then I found out they were cannibals. I figured if it was good enough for them, it was good enough for me.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#65  Postby The_Piper » Mar 01, 2019 4:47 am

I don't imagine I'll ever try it. Same goes for mayo, but that's because of the egg allergy. While we're in the YGS thread, there's no octopi. It's octopuses. This isn't Latin. :snooty:
My spell checker says both are words. The internet says octopus is a Greek word. https://www.grammarly.com/blog/octopi-octopuses/
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#66  Postby Hermit » Mar 01, 2019 4:52 am

The_Piper wrote:I don't imagine I'll ever try it. Same goes for mayo, but that's because of the egg allergy. While we're in the YGS thread, there's no octopi. It's octopuses. This isn't Latin. :snooty:
My spell checker says both are words. The internet says octopus is a Greek word. https://www.grammarly.com/blog/octopi-octopuses/

So, octopussy is out then?
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#67  Postby The_Piper » Mar 01, 2019 5:01 am

Hermit wrote:
The_Piper wrote:I don't imagine I'll ever try it. Same goes for mayo, but that's because of the egg allergy. While we're in the YGS thread, there's no octopi. It's octopuses. This isn't Latin. :snooty:
My spell checker says both are words. The internet says octopus is a Greek word. https://www.grammarly.com/blog/octopi-octopuses/

So, octopussy is out then?

No, that one's cool. :teef:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#68  Postby don't get me started » Mar 01, 2019 5:59 am

I once read somewhere that as Octopus is based on Greek, not Latin, if we wanted to pluralize it according to the rules of Greek, then we should rightly say 'Octopodes'.
I've never liked particularly liked the borrowing of grammatical rules from Latin into English. 'Curriculum' could quite nicely be pluralized as 'Curriculums' rather than 'Curricula' as far as I'm concerned.
And don't get me started on 'Datum' and 'Data'.
'.... and the data are clear in showing that ...' :snooty:

'Information' is uncountable in English (Although my students might say something like, 'I got many informations from the website.')
I think that it is countable in Italian (and some other languages) but I think that deploying Latin grammar for English words is ridiculous and is born of snobbery.

After all, we don't worry about saying 'Oh look at all the lovely Kimonos' even though Japanese doesn't have a plural form for most nouns. (They use a classifier system instead, similar to English 'Two head of cattle')

Neither would we worry about Russian where Moskva is the capital of that country but Russians would alter this word to Moskvu in the sentence ' I went to Moscow'. (To do with marking the destination to which one is moving towards...not something we do in English).
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#69  Postby Hermit » Mar 01, 2019 6:18 am

Don't stop, don't get me started ( ;) ). This is fascinating stuff, and it helps me to get over the conditioning I went through when I learnt just enough Latin to insist on (now) archaic influences on the German and English languages. While I have succeeded in jettisoning some of them, others, such as in connection with data and media are still a bit problematic for me. My tendency toward pedantry and literalism is not helpful there. Your posts are.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#70  Postby zulumoose » Mar 01, 2019 6:35 am

Hermit wrote:
The_Piper wrote:I like-ah cheese-ah pizza. No-ah pepperoni. Pineapple e sacrileg-eh!! :teef: :shifty:

Pineapple on pizza is the best ever Canadian invention. If there were such a thing as the Nobel prize for culinary achievements, Sam Panopoulos would have been a shoo-in for it. Alas, the genius behind this utterly delicious creation died on the 8th of June 2017, so he will never receive his just deserts now. Ontario ought to build a statue in his honour to make up for it.


I have to confess, I just googled shoo-in and just deserts because I thought both of them were wrong.
It seems both are the original correct versions, and shoe-in/just desserts, although both are widely used, and probably would have been given a pass in English class even decades ago, are not the original or most correct versions.

I am shocked at my own ignorance of this.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#71  Postby Evolving » Mar 01, 2019 2:57 pm

don't get me started wrote:I once read somewhere that as Octopus is based on Greek, not Latin, if we wanted to pluralize it according to the rules of Greek, then we should rightly say 'Octopodes'.


That's true (and in German, quite uncontroversially, the plural is Oktopoden), but in English that seems to me far too precious and pedantic, and I always say "octopuses" on the incredibly frequent occasions when I refer to the animals.

The objection to "octopi" is that it's a false friend: it's not an English plural, and as a Latin plural it's the wrong language for "octopus". We might as well say "we went to the airport in a couple of omnibi" or "we cooked the venison with a few delicious ji".
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#72  Postby The_Piper » Mar 01, 2019 4:21 pm

I linked to the Greek plural form upthread. Maybe I've posted one too many Seinfeld videos for people to click on anything I post. :nono: Fal might like this one. :lol:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#73  Postby don't get me started » Mar 02, 2019 12:06 am

On the subject of animal based foods and plurals (if that is an allowable segue) the way that English goes about pluralizing animals and the meat of animals is another pitfall for my students.

Japanese is like German in that the one is simply derived from the other.
Schwein (Pig) Schweinefleisch (Literally, Swine flesh)
豚 (Buta) = Pig. 豚肉 Buta Niku = (Literally pig meat)

English buggers around a bit.

Pig = Pork
Cow = Beef
Deer = Venison

But when we get to poultry, the animal and the meat use the same word.

Chicken = Chicken
Turkey = Turkey
Goose = Goose

The difference is that the animal word is countable ( one chicken, two chickens) but the meat word is not countable (I ate a lot of chicken)

Now, as I mentioned up thread, Japanese doesn't really do plurals and plurals in English are one of those things that often get forgotten in the stream of speech. ' I bought two new book' is a fairly common type of error.

So, when the students are talking about pets, they may come out with 'I like dog', meaning they enjoy the companionship of those animals (What Milan Kundera once beautifully described as 'Those merry ambassadors from the world of animals'..but I digress.) But seeing as they forgot the plural, what it actually means, is they like eating the flesh of canis familiaris.

Another one of those things that native speakers of a language know, but don't know they know, but language learners have to attend to.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#74  Postby Fallible » Mar 03, 2019 8:47 pm

don't get me started wrote:The Japanese, purists though they often are about their own food, become inventive with the cuisines of other lands.

Octopus, sweetcorn and mayonnaise pizza... yep, it's a thing. :yuk:


I...my...nope. Nope, nope, nope, nope...

Image
Last edited by Fallible on Mar 03, 2019 8:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#75  Postby Fallible » Mar 03, 2019 8:51 pm

don't get me started wrote:On the subject of animal based foods and plurals (if that is an allowable segue) the way that English goes about pluralizing animals and the meat of animals is another pitfall for my students.

Japanese is like German in that the one is simply derived from the other.
Schwein (Pig) Schweinefleisch (Literally, Swine flesh)
豚 (Buta) = Pig. 豚肉 Buta Niku = (Literally pig meat)

English buggers around a bit.

Pig = Pork
Cow = Beef
Deer = Venison

But when we get to poultry, the animal and the meat use the same word.

Chicken = Chicken
Turkey = Turkey
Goose = Goose

The difference is that the animal word is countable ( one chicken, two chickens) but the meat word is not countable (I ate a lot of chicken)

Now, as I mentioned up thread, Japanese doesn't really do plurals and plurals in English are one of those things that often get forgotten in the stream of speech. ' I bought two new book' is a fairly common type of error.

So, when the students are talking about pets, they may come out with 'I like dog', meaning they enjoy the companionship of those animals (What Milan Kundera once beautifully described as 'Those merry ambassadors from the world of animals'..but I digress.) But seeing as they forgot the plural, what it actually means, is they like eating the flesh of canis familiaris.

Another one of those things that native speakers of a language know, but don't know they know, but language learners have to attend to.



Ah. Now if, for the sake of argument, a Japanese speaker does like to eat dog (I don't know of they do or not, but bear with me), how does one tell the difference, or is there a separate way of saying that? Or am I just very stupid, and they just add the word for 'eating'? :teef:
John Grant wrote:They say 'let go, let go, let go, you must learn to let go'.
If I hear that fucking phrase again, this baby's gonna blow
Into a million itsy bitsy tiny pieces, don't you know,
Just like my favourite scene in Scanners .
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#76  Postby The_Piper » Mar 03, 2019 9:54 pm

Fallible wrote:
don't get me started wrote:The Japanese, purists though they often are about their own food, become inventive with the cuisines of other lands.

Octopus, sweetcorn and mayonnaise pizza... yep, it's a thing. :yuk:


I...my...nope. Nope, nope, nope, nope...

Image

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Talking to someone about pizza today because they live in the town where my favorite Maine pizza place is in and she told me I should try the blt pizza. Bacon, lettuce, tomato, and mayo. I don't think I should. :snooty:
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#77  Postby Hermit » Mar 03, 2019 10:13 pm

Children are notoriously fussy eaters. My siblings and I were no exception. Our parents did not insist that we eat everything my mother, who loved to cook and knew how to prepare hundreds of different dishes from all over the world, dished up. They did insist that we at least try a bite or two. More often than not we'd start off going "Nope. Nope, nope, nope, nope...", contorting our faces at the very look and smell of the concoction confronting us, then finish up quite liking it. I learnt from this to not reject food before at least sampling it. I'll even give kæstur hákarl, rooster scrotums and bull's penis a try if offered. Doesn't mean I'll finish up liking the taste, but at least I will have put it to the test before making a decision.

Witchetty grubs are quite tasty. They have a nutty flavour.

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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#78  Postby The_Piper » Mar 03, 2019 11:38 pm

That's a lot of work for a little tidbit, by the standards of the last 10 milennia. :teef: I could be mistaken for a fussy eater, but that's due to the food allergies. I like to try new things as well. I'd be weary of the caterpillar, I could be allergic to that tree. :lol: I'm assuming the tree was doomed before he hatcheted into it?
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#79  Postby surreptitious57 » Mar 04, 2019 12:01 am

I dont think I could eat a grub because I am too squeamish
I certainly wouldnt try it just because I never had it before
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Re: Adventures in the English language; AkaThe YGS thread

#80  Postby The_Piper » Mar 04, 2019 12:08 am

surreptitious57 wrote:I dont think I could eat a grub because I am too squeamish
I certainly wouldnt try it just because I never had it before

I agree, that's not a good reason to. I'm assuming it's a part of that local culture. Kinda like, for instance, fiddle heads up here. People who think broccoli is gross eat young fern shoots that they picked by a river or stream. It's not bad, but broccoli is way the fuck better. :crazy: :lol:
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