Anyone tried Duolingo?

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Anyone tried Duolingo?

#1  Postby Rome Existed » Jun 18, 2012 2:27 am

It's an online website, in beta, that teaches languages.

I chose German.

How many different meansing can "sie" have?

And learning when to use 'der', 'die' and 'das' is driving me insane!
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#2  Postby Regina » Jun 18, 2012 7:22 am

sie-she
SIe- you, plural polite
sie -her
sie- they

You can also look here: http://www.rationalskepticism.org/gener ... 29944.html
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Anyone tried Duolingo?

#3  Postby CdesignProponentsist » Jun 18, 2012 7:24 am

I signed up for beta. Was never invited.
"Things don't need to be true, as long as they are believed" - Alexander Nix, CEO Cambridge Analytica
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#4  Postby devogue » Jun 18, 2012 7:29 am

Rome Existed wrote:It's an online website, in beta, that teaches languages.

I chose German.

How many different meansing can "sie" have?

And learning when to use 'der', 'die' and 'das' is driving me insane!


Der Fuhrer

Die Fuhrer...er...ess

Das Fuhreunuch
It's PETUNIAS TIME again, folks!!!

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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#5  Postby Regina » Jun 18, 2012 7:38 am

Führer, Dev.
Soviel Zeit muß sein. :mrgreen:
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#6  Postby Rome Existed » Jun 20, 2012 11:25 pm

Seems like you're totally screwed in German if you can't remember the gender of every noun lol otherwise you won't know whether to put der, das, die, den, dem, des, ein, eine, einer or eines before it and make any sense.
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#7  Postby CdesignProponentsist » Jun 20, 2012 11:33 pm

Rome Existed wrote:Seems like you're totally screwed in German if you can't remember the gender of every noun lol otherwise you won't know whether to put der, das, die, den, dem, des, ein, eine, einer or eines before it and make any sense.


This brings back many a nightmare I had from my Jr High school German class.
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#8  Postby Regina » Jun 20, 2012 11:39 pm

As I've pointed out ad nauseam in another thread today, all sciences, arts, and quite a few ideas are female: die Chemie, die Physik, die Mathematik, die Theologie, die Liebe, die Gerechtigkeit etc.
It's a starting point.
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#9  Postby DougC » Jun 20, 2012 11:42 pm

Rome Existed wrote:
And learning when to use 'der', 'die' and 'das' is driving me insane!

When I was at school I went for German.
One language and four countrys.
(Austria, Switzerland, West Germany and East - yea, it was WAY back then.)

Ran into the same issue.


Cant speak German. :coffee:
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To be, is to do (Sartre)
Do be do be do (Sinatra)
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#10  Postby Rome Existed » Jun 21, 2012 1:08 am

Regina wrote:As I've pointed out ad nauseam in another thread today, all sciences, arts, and quite a few ideas are female: die Chemie, die Physik, die Mathematik, die Theologie, die Liebe, die Gerechtigkeit etc.
It's a starting point.


I found out that almost all nouns that end in an e are feminine.

Apparently though if you're gotta guess it's more likely to be masculine.
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#11  Postby Rome Existed » Jun 21, 2012 9:40 am

It is interesting how you can fuck around with the order of words in a sentence and still mean the same fucking thing due to which definite or indefinite article was used.

And by interesting I mean, "Ouch, my head."
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#12  Postby Saim » Sep 10, 2012 4:11 pm

This is tangentially related to the gender and declension thing; and I think this is a good article for people who are struggling with particular grammar points in German, or any language really. It helped me realise that I need to rethink my attitude towards Serbian (which has 7 cases, take that German-learners :P).

http://www.fluentin3months.com/german-is-easy/

About a year ago I wrote a post about why Czech isn’t as hard as you think. To this day it is still one of the most popular posts on this blog and many people have told me that my suggestions have helped them immensely with their Czech.

Now I’m taking it a step further and instead of just saying that German isn’t as hard as you think, I’m boldly claiming that German is easy and this time have explained it in much more depth. Give me enough time and I can gladly explain to you how any language is easy. There is no such thing as the hardest language in the world.

This isn’t because I was bitten by a radioactive multilingual spider. I’m not a genius. If languages came “naturally” to me, then I would have aced German the first time round during my five years of German schooling. Instead, I got a C as my final grade and couldn’t even order a train ticket in German when I visited Munich a few years ago.

Despite that, in just three months of my second attempt, I passed four out of five sections of Goethe Institut’s Zentrale Oberstufenprüfung (German mastery exam). What I changed in my approach to learning the language is something everyone could implement: I stopped telling myself how hard German was and started focusing on the positive. Being a positive filter made the language easy for me.

This isn’t fooling yourself with empty mantras or willing the universe to make it easy for you. There are very logical and systematic ways of looking at a language to make sure that you keep this positive feedback loop up and make swift progress in the language.

[...]

This approach also works extremely well to argue that a language is hard. Although that argument has no benefits at all, unless demotivating people is how you get your kicks.

In fact, someone could counter my book with a list of reasons German or any language is hard, and they already have! You can find this in almost every academic language course in the world.

Most technical courses I have come across are nothing more than lists of differences between English and the target language. These grammar points are different and those words of vocabulary are different. It seems like the most logical thing to do – English does it this way, German does it that way. Of course it’s different – that’s why it’s another language, right?

The problem with this approach is that it usually focuses on nothing but the differences. What about the patterns? What about the many similarities? At best these are nothing more than minor after-thoughts in courses. I focus on these patterns within the grammar and vocabulary and that gives me a huge short-cut to speaking the language quicker.

This is something that many other successful language learners do too! I managed to interview Stu Jay Raj for 55 minutes as part of the latest update to the Language Hacking Guide, and he had the following to say when I asked him about languages being hard:

Go in there and say this is the most unbelievably easy, logical and systematic language that I could ever learn – no matter what language it is, and your brain will make it so. And you’ll start finding finding patterns that native speakers do naturally.

[...]

To see what I mean, download the free chapter of Why German is easy and see how I explain my way of looking at German word plurals. It was suggested to me in school that I simply learn the plural of the word each time I learn a new word, as well as its gender, irregular declensions etc. This is a grossly inefficient way to learn a language, especially if you want to speak it soon.

You would be intimidated and not ever say the word in particular contexts (plural, different case, not sure of its gender etc.), because you haven’t learned that particular word’s special properties yet. This makes a language even more intimidating when you realise the mountain of vocabulary waiting to be learned and how your work is increasing exponentially with what you have to do for every single word. It’s better to find the patterns that work most of the time, and make mistakes in the remaining infrequent cases.

What I did with plurals was find the patterns, learn these, see what the majority situations are, and then guess if I wasn’t sure. This has never hindered my communication in the language. When I get more confident then I can come back to these points and tidy them up so that I am speaking more correctly. At that stage it is much easier because you will be used to the language so much more.

But focusing on perfection in the beginner to intermediate stages of learning a language is a huge mistake. Even natives don’t speak perfectly – and you would indeed have to be a genius to speak with no mistakes throughout your entire learning process. Some rules and vocabulary take a few tries to sink in. The only way to get there is by practice and this involves practising even when you are still making mistakes.

Accepting that mistakes are inevitable and not being too intimidated by that has been a key factor to my success in all languages. I still cannot say fully correct sentences in my current Hungarian mission, and yet I am communicating in the language already because I’m not afraid to make mistakes. Later I’ll be communicating at a much more impressive level, but only because I accepted that this mistake-heavy part of learning is a necessary stage to pass through. I embrace making mistakes as a fun and necessary part of the language learning journey.


It's more about your attitude than figuring out the grammar. That comes naturally from exposure. Good luck ;)
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Re: Anyone tried Duolingo?

#13  Postby gameswithwords » Nov 27, 2012 2:24 pm

So I'm not sure I'd find Duolingo great for learning a language I don't already know, but it's been fantastic for brushing up my Spanish.
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