Linguistic misconception bingo

Discuss various aspects of natural language.

Moderators: Calilasseia, ADParker


Ads by Google


Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#2  Postby I'm With Stupid » Oct 11, 2016 9:45 pm

You missed "children learn languages faster."
Image
User avatar
I'm With Stupid
 
Posts: 9618
Age: 36
Male

Country: Malaysia
Jolly Roger (arr)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#3  Postby scott1328 » Oct 11, 2016 10:53 pm

Also X-bar theory
User avatar
scott1328
 
Name: Some call me... Tim
Posts: 8695
Male

United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#4  Postby don't get me started » Oct 12, 2016 2:08 am

Nice find Saim.
That made me laugh. :thumbup:

Some more:
There is a bunch of guys in backwoods Appalachia that speak perfect Elizabethan English.
Conversation is the exchange of propositional statements between speakers
Spoken language is a corrupt and degraded form of written language
Children should learn their 'native' language correctly first before starting on a second language
There is such a thing as THE 'th' sound in English (just the one)
The English alphabet has 26 characters and 26 sounds (You'd be surprised by what I hear sometimes)
Language standards these days are getting worser and worser
Japanese has three writing systems (If this is true, then English has two)
A native speaker knows all of the vocabulary and grammar of his or her language perfectly
There is such as thing as standard English and this is what everyone should speak and write
LAD
don't get me started
 
Posts: 1130

Country: Japan
Japan (jp)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#5  Postby Saim » Oct 12, 2016 5:40 am

A native speaker knows all of the vocabulary and grammar of his or her language perfectly


What do you mean by this?

There is such as thing as standard English and this is what everyone should speak and write


I mean, there is such a thing as Standard English, surely? When you see written English you can't really tell where someone's from besides some small arbitray differences that don't affect pronunciation (colo[u]r, civili[s]/[z]ation).
User avatar
Saim
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 1138
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#6  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Oct 12, 2016 7:38 am

scott1328 wrote:Also X-bar theory

What's that?
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
User avatar
Thomas Eshuis
 
Name: Thomas Eshuis
Posts: 31080
Age: 31
Male

Country: Netherlands
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#7  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Oct 12, 2016 7:40 am

Saim wrote:
A native speaker knows all of the vocabulary and grammar of his or her language perfectly


What do you mean by this?

I assume that a native speaker cannot be ignorant of any grammar rules nor any part of the vocabulary of said native language.
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
User avatar
Thomas Eshuis
 
Name: Thomas Eshuis
Posts: 31080
Age: 31
Male

Country: Netherlands
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#8  Postby Saim » Oct 12, 2016 8:50 am

Thomas Eshuis wrote:I assume that a native speaker cannot be ignorant of any grammar rules nor any part of the vocabulary of said native language.


Me too. Native speakers have an intuitive understanding of grammar that allows them to speak in a structured way. This grammar isn't necessarily the same as the grammar of the standard language, and there can be lots of variation according to dialect, but it's still grammar all the same.
User avatar
Saim
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 1138
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#9  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Oct 12, 2016 8:52 am

Saim wrote:
Thomas Eshuis wrote:I assume that a native speaker cannot be ignorant of any grammar rules nor any part of the vocabulary of said native language.


Me too. Native speakers have an intuitive understanding of grammar that allows them to speak in a structured way. This grammar isn't necessarily the same as the grammar of the standard language, and there can be lots of variation according to dialect, but it's still grammar all the same.

But they can still be ignorant or wrong about particular grammar rules.
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
User avatar
Thomas Eshuis
 
Name: Thomas Eshuis
Posts: 31080
Age: 31
Male

Country: Netherlands
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#10  Postby Saim » Oct 12, 2016 9:26 am

Thomas Eshuis wrote:But they can still be ignorant or wrong about particular grammar rules.


What do you mean by grammar rule?

Let's look at it this way: many native English-speakers think that using the expression he mad is agrammatical in all English, because it's agrammatical in their variety and the varieties that do accept it are associated with lower socioeconomic groups. But as it turns out, in African-American vernacular speech he mad is said, but you won't find anyone saying the agrammatical I mad*. Languages like Russian and Hebrew, on the other hand, remove the verb in all cases. Why is this? Does this constitute being ignorant/wrong about a grammar rule?
User avatar
Saim
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 1138
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Linguistic misconception bingo

#11  Postby scott1328 » Oct 12, 2016 10:58 pm

X-bar theory is a theory of innate grammar proposed by Chomsky that has failed to garner if any empirical support
User avatar
scott1328
 
Name: Some call me... Tim
Posts: 8695
Male

United States (us)
Print view this post


Return to Linguistics

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 1 guest