Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

In our civil calendar week, why wasn't Sunday renamed by Christians in English?

Discuss various aspects of natural language.

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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#41  Postby chairman bill » Dec 03, 2011 7:25 pm

akigr8 wrote:
Mazille wrote:Washing day? That's cute. :)

Washing/bathing day. The Vikings needed a washing day after pilfering all week long. ;)


Pilfering? More rampaging, raping & pillaging.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#42  Postby chairman bill » Dec 03, 2011 7:27 pm

Globe wrote:
monkeyboy wrote:I'm pretty sure all our days are named for pagan gods or objects of worship.

Monday- Moon day
Tuesday -Escapes me for the moment. Tyr's Day (Tyr was the norse god of war)
Wednesday- Woden's day
Thursday- Thor's day
Friday- Freya's day
Saturday- Saturn's day
Sunday- kind of obvious really.

I like that we've stuck to the old ways rather than pander to Xian nonesense.


Fixed ;)


I think you might find that was Tiw's Day, from the Old English name for the same one-handed* god.

* Fenrir bit the other one off
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#43  Postby Clive Durdle » Dec 03, 2011 7:40 pm

And Waltham Abbey has a Zodiac on its ceiling..
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#44  Postby katja z » Dec 03, 2011 8:18 pm

In a lot of the Slavic languages (can't speak for all), Sunday is, loosely, "the day you don't work". Nothing to do with the Lord (although the Christian reference is obvious).
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#45  Postby felltoearth » Dec 04, 2011 12:58 am

For the same reason we say England instead of Angleterre.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#46  Postby akigr8 » Dec 04, 2011 5:07 pm

chairman bill wrote:
akigr8 wrote:
Mazille wrote:Washing day? That's cute. :)

Washing/bathing day. The Vikings needed a washing day after pilfering all week long. ;)


Pilfering? More rampaging, raping & pillaging.

Early Scandinavian tourism, the same way british tourists behave today. ;)
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#47  Postby chairman bill » Dec 04, 2011 5:42 pm

We had an amphibious exercise on the coast of Denmark. SBS had been in and done a recce on the beach. They left some signs for us when we landed. One pointed one way & was labelled 'Rape', the other pointed in the other direction, labelled 'Pillage'. The locals complained & they were taken down. No sense of humour some people.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#48  Postby akigr8 » Dec 04, 2011 5:52 pm

:lol: Funny guys.

Probably churchgoers that did the complaining. :nod:
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#49  Postby Horwood Beer-Master » Dec 04, 2011 8:02 pm

chairman bill wrote:
akigr8 wrote:
Mazille wrote:Washing day? That's cute. :)

Washing/bathing day. The Vikings needed a washing day after pilfering all week long. ;)


Pilfering? More rampaging, raping & pillaging.


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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#50  Postby MrFungus420 » Dec 05, 2011 6:20 am

monkeyboy wrote:I'm pretty sure all our days are named for pagan gods or objects of worship.

Monday- Moon day
Tuesday -Escapes me for the moment.
Wednesday- Woden's day
Thursday- Thor's day
Friday- Freya's day
Saturday- Saturn's day
Sunday- kind of obvious really.

I like that we've stuck to the old ways rather than pander to Xian nonesense.


Tuesday is named for the god Tyr. And Friday is actually Frigga's day.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#51  Postby MrFungus420 » Dec 05, 2011 6:24 am

Mazille wrote:You're getting slow, Globe. :smoke:


I'm even worse...I haven't gotten to the post I just left saying pretty much the same thing (so, I'm about number 5 or so on the list). :oops:
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#52  Postby Zwaarddijk » Jan 22, 2012 4:32 pm

katja z wrote:In a lot of the Slavic languages (can't speak for all), Sunday is, loosely, "the day you don't work". Nothing to do with the Lord (although the Christian reference is obvious).


In Russian, Sunday is воскресенье, meaning "resurrection", from the obvious source. This is because неделя ("not doing"/"not working") changed from signifying the day itself, to signify the period it delineated, e.g. the week. Takes the Russians to call weeks "not working".
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#53  Postby Mus Ponticus » Feb 05, 2012 9:28 am

akigr8 wrote:Norwegian translated the days are:

Moon day
Tyr's day
Odin's day
Thor's day
Freya's day
Washing day
Sun day

The same are for the rest of the Nordic countries I would guess.
Wrong guess. The Icelandic Christians "cleansed" the names of the week of the pagan gods. So in Icelandic it's:

Moon day
Third day
Middle-week day
Fifth day
Fasting day

Washing day
Sun day
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#54  Postby Scot Dutchy » Feb 05, 2012 10:36 am

Why washing on a Saturday?

Monday is washing day. From the old song

http://www.casablancakids.com/abcs/pdfs/GREAT%20BIG%20HITS%202.pdf



Today is Monday, Today is Monday
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:

Today is Tuesday, Today is Tuesday
Tuesday the ironin’
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:

Today is Wednesday, Today is Wednesday
Wednesday the gardenin’
Tuesday the ironin’
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:

Today is Thursday, Today is Thursday
Thursday soup
Wednesday the gardenin’
Tuesday the ironin’
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:

Today is Friday, Today is Friday
Friday Pay Day!
Thursday soup
Wednesday the gardenin’
Tuesday the ironin’
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:

Today is Saturday, Today is Saturday
Saturday is shoppin’!
Friday Pay Day!
Thursday soup
Wednesday the gardenin’
Tuesday the ironin’
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:

Today is Sunday, Today is Sunday
Sunday……. Resting
Saturday is shoppin’
Friday Pay Day!
Thursday soup
Wednesday the gardenin’
Tuesday the ironin’
Monday the washin’
Everybody happy? But I should say:
Everybody happy? But I should say!
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#55  Postby Zwaarddijk » Feb 05, 2012 10:52 am

Scot Dutchy wrote:Why washing on a Saturday?


You also find this in all other Scandinavian languages, and borrowed into Finnish and Estonian. It's a tradition that still lives on among many Finns, for instance, to heat up the sauna on Saturday, although hygiene has improved from the time this day was named.

The name comes from proto-Germanic *laugr, meaning "water, waterfall", which after some semantic changes also produced a verb (e.g. Swedish löga). In Swedish at least, löga is archaic, and I doubt most kids would know what it means unless they've been tol of the etymology of lördag.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#56  Postby Scot Dutchy » Feb 05, 2012 11:14 am

Zwaarddijk wrote:
Scot Dutchy wrote:Why washing on a Saturday?


You also find this in all other Scandinavian languages, and borrowed into Finnish and Estonian. It's a tradition that still lives on among many Finns, for instance, to heat up the sauna on Saturday, although hygiene has improved from the time this day was named.

The name comes from proto-Germanic *laugr, meaning "water, waterfall", which after some semantic changes also produced a verb (e.g. Swedish löga). In Swedish at least, löga is archaic, and I doubt most kids would know what it means unless they've been tol of the etymology of lördag.


Ok thanks.

Monday was always washing day in Britain. The Dutch have no fixed day for anything. Just depends on the family.
Catholics always had Friday as fish day but that was about it. Sunday morning was for the church amoungst catholics with the afternoon taken up with sport. With proddies Sunday was totally for the church. Up to five sevices in one day (the poor sods :lol:).
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#57  Postby Zwaarddijk » Feb 05, 2012 11:50 am

Scot Dutchy wrote:
Zwaarddijk wrote:
Scot Dutchy wrote:Why washing on a Saturday?


You also find this in all other Scandinavian languages, and borrowed into Finnish and Estonian. It's a tradition that still lives on among many Finns, for instance, to heat up the sauna on Saturday, although hygiene has improved from the time this day was named.

The name comes from proto-Germanic *laugr, meaning "water, waterfall", which after some semantic changes also produced a verb (e.g. Swedish löga). In Swedish at least, löga is archaic, and I doubt most kids would know what it means unless they've been tol of the etymology of lördag.


Ok thanks.

Monday was always washing day in Britain. The Dutch have no fixed day for anything. Just depends on the family.
Catholics always had Friday as fish day but that was about it. Sunday morning was for the church amoungst catholics with the afternoon taken up with sport. With proddies Sunday was totally for the church. Up to five sevices in one day (the poor sods :lol:).

Now that I read your entire post - including the poem, I found an interesting parallel - soup on thursday. This at least is quite a common ~tradition, although I doubt many really intentionally and actively 'observe' it. Many lunch restaurants and such do keep to it, though - pea soup generally is the main course. Pancakes, waffles, etc are usually served as dessert with it.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#58  Postby Scot Dutchy » Feb 05, 2012 12:43 pm

Yes pea soup. Here it is called "snert".

Image

It so thick that spoon stands up in it. It also full of smoked sausage. Lovely on cold days after skating.
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#59  Postby Oeditor » Mar 09, 2012 11:06 am

Well, that seems to be more or less sorted. Now for a more fundamental question: ignoring the actual name - or day - used, who was first to declare "Today is Monday"? Has it been clocking up, day after day, week after week, year after year since 0/0/-6000? Or whatever day Adam first spoke? Were the revolutionary French the first to imagine a week of other than seven days, for that matter?
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Re: Why does English use "Sunday" instead of "Lord's Day"?

#60  Postby Zwaarddijk » Mar 09, 2012 11:42 am

Oeditor wrote:Well, that seems to be more or less sorted. Now for a more fundamental question: ignoring the actual name - or day - used, who was first to declare "Today is Monday"? Has it been clocking up, day after day, week after week, year after year since 0/0/-6000? Or whatever day Adam first spoke? Were the revolutionary French the first to imagine a week of other than seven days, for that matter?


The revolutionary Babylonians seem to be the originators of our week at least, although the Jews altered some of the ideas involved quite a bit (in Babylonia, the 7th, 14th, 21th and 28th of a lunar month were terrible days of bad luck, Judaism makes them into festive days of rest, and decouples them from the month. (Although not entirely. The interactions between month-length and weeks in the Jewish calendar ever since about 800CE; these interactions serve the ensure that there are no overlong series of festivals and sabbaths such that such a series would prevent people from doing things necessary for survival - simply put, either yom kippur is on a sabbath or there's at least one day between the sabbath and yom kippur, similar considerations for all other festivals.) )

The Chinese predated the French with a ten-day week by centuries, as did the Egyptians. But all week-lengths from 4 to 10 have existed - Rome even had an 8-day week for a while. At least 4, 5, 6 and 7 are still in use.
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