Heart Attack? It Confuses Your Immune System

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Heart Attack? It Confuses Your Immune System

#1  Postby Calilasseia » Jul 28, 2018 8:41 pm

This is, apparently, a recent finding, courtesy of this research, which found that dying heart cells following a heart attack, release DNA fragments that trigger the IRF3 antiviral immune response, even though the cells in question did not contain any viruses. Blocking this immune response, immediately following a heart attack, has been demonstrated experimentally to improve post-trauma outcomes.

There's also a paper in Nature (sadly behind a paywall) here.
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Re: Heart Attack? It Confuses Your Immune System

#2  Postby GenesForLife » Nov 22, 2018 2:41 am

For context - the antiviral immune response mediated by IRF3 usually is in synergy with IRF7 , and it serves as a key integration point for responses set off by various nucleic acids linked to pathogens. double stranded DNA in particular can be recognised by the cGAS receptor, whereas double stranded RNA can set it off through RIG-I or MDA5. Once activated, these induce the activation of an interferon response that can condition cells from the adaptive immune system to mount an inflammatory response. This of course means that when you have the abnormal release of cellular contents you can get off-target carnage. These pathways are also really useful in cancer treatment, where , for example, radiation , which causes the release of double stranded DNA into the cytoplasm or the broader environment, activates this response such that it improves responses to immunotherapies that target the adaptive immune system's function.
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