'Snot wars' study yields new class of drugs

Antibiotic resistance

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'Snot wars' study yields new class of drugs

#1  Postby DougC » Jul 28, 2016 11:00 pm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36910766

B.B.C. Article
A new class of antibiotics has been discovered by analysing the bacterial warfare taking place up people's noses, scientists report.
Tests reported in the journal Nature found the resulting drug, lugdunin, could treat superbug infections.
The researchers, at the University of Tubingen in Germany, say the human body is an untapped source of new drugs.
The last new class of the drugs to reach patients was discovered in the 1980s.
Nearly all antibiotics were discovered in soil bacteria, but the University of Tubingen research team turned to the human body.

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Re: 'Snot wars' study yields new class of drugs

#2  Postby kiore » Jul 28, 2016 11:55 pm

I suspect there are many more antimicrobials just lurking nearby, serum treatment has also been overlooked for a long time now.
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Re: 'Snot wars' study yields new class of drugs

#3  Postby DougC » Jul 28, 2016 11:59 pm

I get the feeling that unless we can find an antibiotic that cures male pattern baldness or give you an erection as a side effect, we are going to be dragging our feet on this.
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Re: 'Snot wars' study yields new class of drugs

#4  Postby Thommo » Jul 29, 2016 1:45 am

Given how quickly bacteria have adapted to current antibiotics, doesn't it seem intuitively a rather dangerous idea to isolate agents from within the existing human immune response and develop them into treatments? What do we do if and when they develop resistance to such treatments? Isn't that just systematically eliminating the effectiveness of our own bodies' ability to fight infection?
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