Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#281  Postby orpheus » Sep 08, 2018 11:31 pm

Let's try for peace in 2018, shall we?
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#282  Postby Animavore » Sep 09, 2018 5:54 pm

Why does this work?
A most evolved electron.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#283  Postby Skinny Puppy » Sep 09, 2018 6:27 pm

It should sound horrible... yet it doesn't. :scratch: Weird, really weird.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#284  Postby surreptitious57 » Sep 09, 2018 6:46 pm

Same time signatures / same instruments / same production
And in symphonies instruments work together as a collective
There are only nine of them so the sound is easier to control
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#285  Postby Alan B » Sep 09, 2018 10:31 pm

For me it is the Late Quartets by Beethoven played by the Amadeus Quartet, particularly opus 135.


I felt a loss when Peter Schidlof died - The Amadeus was no more.

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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#286  Postby Skinny Puppy » Sep 11, 2018 6:47 pm

Alan B wrote:For me it is the Late Quartets by Beethoven played by the Amadeus Quartet, particularly opus 135.


I felt a loss when Peter Schidlof died - The Amadeus was no more.

Edit


I’d never heard of them before and I’d never listened to Opus 135. Their playing and Opus 135 is excellent! :thumbup:

A short trip down memory lane…

A few years back I was reading about Beethoven and the author raised an interesting point. He said (roughly) that if a newly discovered work by Beethoven were to emerge, 1000s would break down doors to hear it, especially since it was by Beethoven, and a piece which not a living person would have ever heard. In addition, since no one was aware that it existed, it would have a huge impact on the musical world.

Then he asked how many works of Beethoven have you (his readers) never listened to? If you get excited by the prospect of hearing an unknown work, why not get just as excited discovering works that are already in the canon, but you’ve simply ignored them, for whatever reasons?

I think that he made a very good point.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#287  Postby Alan B » Sep 11, 2018 8:21 pm

The late Quartets - Wiki
These quartets went far beyond the comprehension of musicians and audiences of the time. One musician commented that "we know there is something there, but we do not know what it is." Composer Louis Spohr called them "indecipherable, uncorrected horrors."

Opinion has changed considerably from the time of their first bewildered reception: these six quartets (counting the Große Fuge) comprise Beethoven's last major, completed compositions and are widely considered to be among the greatest musical compositions of all time.[8] The musicologist Theodor Adorno, in particular, thought highly of them,[9] and Igor Stravinsky described the Große Fuge as "an absolutely contemporary piece of music that will be contemporary forever".[10] Their forms and ideas inspired and continue to inspire musicians and composers, such as Richard Wagner and Béla Bartók. Wagner, when reflecting on Op. 131's first movement, said that it "reveals the most melancholy sentiment expressed in music".[11] The last musical wish of Schubert was to hear the Op. 131 quartet, which he did on 14 November 1828, five days before his death.[12] Upon listening to a performance of the Op. 131 quartet, Schubert remarked, "After this, what is left for us to write?"[13] Of the late quartets, Beethoven's favorite was the Fourteenth Quartet, op. 131 in C♯ minor, which he rated as his most perfect single work.[14]

My italics.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#288  Postby Skinny Puppy » Sep 11, 2018 9:23 pm

Alan B wrote:The late Quartets - Wiki
These quartets went far beyond the comprehension of musicians and audiences of the time. One musician commented that "we know there is something there, but we do not know what it is." Composer Louis Spohr called them "indecipherable, uncorrected horrors."

Opinion has changed considerably from the time of their first bewildered reception: these six quartets (counting the Große Fuge) comprise Beethoven's last major, completed compositions and are widely considered to be among the greatest musical compositions of all time.[8] The musicologist Theodor Adorno, in particular, thought highly of them,[9] and Igor Stravinsky described the Große Fuge as "an absolutely contemporary piece of music that will be contemporary forever".[10] Their forms and ideas inspired and continue to inspire musicians and composers, such as Richard Wagner and Béla Bartók. Wagner, when reflecting on Op. 131's first movement, said that it "reveals the most melancholy sentiment expressed in music".[11] The last musical wish of Schubert was to hear the Op. 131 quartet, which he did on 14 November 1828, five days before his death.[12] Upon listening to a performance of the Op. 131 quartet, Schubert remarked, "After this, what is left for us to write?"[13] Of the late quartets, Beethoven's favorite was the Fourteenth Quartet, op. 131 in C♯ minor, which he rated as his most perfect single work.[14]

My italics.



That rings a bell. I have the entire set of CDs by Jeremy Siepmann. He meticulously goes through some of a composer’s works and a very detailed history of their life.

He talks about and gives examples of the String Quartet Op 130. I’m positive that he talks about what you’ve posted… at least as best I can remember. All of his sets are well worth buying.

https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.558024-27
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#289  Postby Keep It Real » Oct 05, 2018 1:32 pm

Arthur : All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's something big and sinister going on in the world. Slartibartfast : No, that's perfectly normal paranoia.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#290  Postby Skinny Puppy » Oct 05, 2018 2:07 pm

Keep It Real wrote:

That is hilarious!

:rofl:
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#291  Postby Keep It Real » Oct 05, 2018 4:05 pm

Yar, 'tis that, and dead posh too, which is a good thing :smoke:
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#292  Postby Keep It Real » Oct 06, 2018 4:27 am

Oh yeah: O'Godno
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#293  Postby SafeAsMilk » Nov 23, 2018 1:58 am

The_Metatron wrote:Having a listen to an album I just downloaded a couple days ago:

Wagner: Orchestral Music from The Ring of the Nibelung, played by the Cleveland Orchestra under the direction of George Szell:

Wagner.jpg


I used to own this same recording, but on LP format under the Great Performances label, which I couldn't find.

Good stuff. But, I think not many people know much of it because it comes from works that are so goddamned long, few people have sat through them from beginning to end. I haven't.

Haven't heard this disc, but I'm assuming it's a lot of the same overtures and such that were on the Excalibur soundtrack. Loved the movie since I was a kid, and the Wagner is a perfect match. It encouraged me to eventually take on the operas themselves.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#294  Postby Animavore » Dec 21, 2018 9:57 am

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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#295  Postby felltoearth » Dec 21, 2018 1:18 pm

:lmao:
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#296  Postby Hermit » Apr 02, 2019 3:55 pm

head asplod

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God just exists
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#297  Postby arugula2 » Jul 25, 2019 1:19 pm

Vivaldi - trio sonata, opus 1 no 12. Hesperion XXI.



Vivaldi - "Et in terra pax" from Gloria RV 589. English Concert & Choir. (Edit: replaced link for better sound quality.)
Last edited by arugula2 on Jul 26, 2019 2:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#298  Postby I'm With Stupid » Jul 25, 2019 7:27 pm

I went to a classical/swing concert not too long ago and saw this piece played by two violinists.



The version I watched was far more of a knees up than this one though. It was like watching a Soviet version of duelling banjos.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#299  Postby arugula2 » Jul 25, 2019 10:53 pm

Continuing with Vivaldi (suck it, Stravinsky!)...
Op8 no2 "summer" 3rd movt. Gil Shaham & Orpheus CO.



Of the hundreds of versions I've heard, still my favorite 4 Seasons. Rhythmically reserved, almost no ornamentation, but dynamic & persuasive. (Modern instruments.) Most of what Orpheus records is probably great. The full concertos:
Spring
Summer
Autumn
Winter

Not everyone may know that these (published 1725) are maybe the oldest example of programmatic music (instrumental music that paints a literal image or tells an explicit story) in the 'classical' tradition. If you follow along with the sonnets that were scribbled onto the manuscript, you can hear a barking dog, a bullfinch, swarms of insects, bugles at a fox hunt (rendered with strings), chattering teeth, a shepherd boy weeping for his doomed flock, slumber after a party, the drip of melting snow on a window sill, the four winds arguing and then merging as one.
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Re: Early, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern music

#300  Postby arugula2 » Jul 26, 2019 1:44 am

Bach - violin concertos. Viktoria Mullova. The host doesn't specify, but by the sound of it it's her '96 recording with the Mullova Ensemble, on the Phillips label, which is superior to her more recent one with Accademia Bizantina. More playful, more self assured.


And because she's just so excellent...
Bach - violin partita no2, ciacconna.


Another one with good instincts for this music is Itzhak Perlman:
Bach - violin sonata no3, allegro assai. From his '88 recording on EMI.


Another ciacconna for comparison... Vito Paternoster on cello. From a posthumous 18th century transcription, probably by one of Bach's sons.
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