AmeriKKKa

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Re: AmeriKKKa

#101  Postby hackenslash » Jun 04, 2021 2:34 pm

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Re: AmeriKKKa

#102  Postby mindhack » Jun 04, 2021 5:04 pm

Wonderful having you back here Agrippina, shooting from the hip your typical informed insightful rants. It’s always been a delight reading your contributions. :)
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#103  Postby arugula2 » Jun 04, 2021 10:23 pm

Agrippina, catching up on your posts - lovely reading as ever, tell us when that blog post goes up.

Question: “leave the depot for the cemetery”… that’s a colloquialism? If so, what do you know about it, and when did you start using it?
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#104  Postby Seabass » Jun 05, 2021 12:15 am



"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#105  Postby arugula2 » Jun 05, 2021 1:28 am

Agrippina wrote:As a child, and unaware of the history of slavery, and American history in general, I used to question why, if South Africa and the USA were settled by Europeans at about the same time, we hadn't reached the same level of sophistication and progress that the USA had.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Then I grew up, got satellite television (or even television in general since we only got it in 1976), and learnt that it wasn't what I'd thought it was. By this time I'd been to the UK, and seen how an integrated country without separation by skin colour worked. Also while I was there I watched some American television, not much because we were busy doing touristy stuff and too tired for TV at night. What I saw amazed and confused me. There was the development that I was aware of being far superior to ours, on the one hand, and the racial issues on the other. At that time, in the wake the of moon landings and NASA looking at more probing of space, the culture and education standards were far superior to ours. I bought books there that I took home to my then toddler children, and my education began.

Before that I'd been a girl from small town South Africa, living in the big city, raising highly intelligent, and I now know, autistic children, who were thirsty for knowledge. I had another two, also autistic, after that trip, the last one, the one now living with me on disability due to his birth oxygen deprivation causing more co-morbidities than the autism did, one of the most intelligent people I've met in my life.(He never ceases to amaze me with his brilliance). We've now been through the age of CNN and Clinton, Bush jnr, Obama, and that other person, and I realise it was smoke and mirrors. I don't mean to disrespect those Americans who aren't dumb but boy, when I see the people who voted for that other person on television, I ask myself why I ever thought America was better! We were living through what the dumb people want to institute in the USA, and what Israel is doing to Palestine, and I'm seeing how people simply don't learn from history.

Education, reading, learning to teach yourself what you know you don't know: that there's a whole world outside that can advise you, tell you what works, and what doesn't work, and what's happening now is not going to work. Money isn't the answer to everything. In fact money is what ruins everything. What does work is to give every single person on the earth the chance to be the best they can be, and instead of accumulating, hoarding, money, hoard books, and read them, learn about the rest of the world. Teach children, make them learn how to live in a world without war, famine, and poverty. Use the warmongering money to create opportunities for those people who, through no fault of their own, were born in South Sudan, where's there's nothing but famine, war, raping and pillaging, while that man who shouldn't have been appointed to clean toilet, let alone be president, shits in a gold toilet.

I know what I'm talking about because in 1976 as I was approaching 30, I finally began my own education, and now as my life is ending, I see my kids on webinars with some of the great minds of our country, discussing the big issues. Not how to solve poverty, but the things we dream about: extending life beyond the limits we now accept, space settlement, mining asteroids, how to live in gravitational regions different from our own. This while the people I grew up with discuss whether a certain narcissistic stalker should've worn tights when she went out with the Queen. For fuck's sake, why are people so stupid when there's so much to learn that's a whole lot more interesting and important than whether or not some privileged arsehole should have his titles removed, or appointing people into high positions of power when they don't even understand the simple basics of viral transmission.

It's a world gone mad. My country lived through nationalism, apartheid, 90% of the population educated only enough to be servants, and it didn't work. Yet try to tell that to someone who thinks a MAGA hat is is the height of fashion, and that making money off shoes made by slave labour, while your father is president, is the way a brilliant businessperson becomes even richer without a single thought for the people locked in their factories to work until they drop. Thank old age that I'll be leaving this behind sooner than later, and that I now stay away from the news before it causes my head to explode.

I can't get enough of your writing...

But anyway - on topic. I've lived longest in the USA (cumulatively... oh... 30 years maybe?) but have lived in 6-8 other countries, which I'm grateful for (mostly for the context, especially cultural) - though never in South Africa, as I've told you elsewhere. But I want to emphasize a small number of elements which I think probably factor hugely in the different trajectories. Most are obvious when mentioned - and I'm thinking of them as I write, so this is me thinking aloud.

1) This really was (once the indigenous peoples were exterminated) white men's country from the start. Some "cleanup" since then, especially in the westward expansion, plus the forced expulsion of Cherokee & Muskogee & other tribes; token treaties in hand, which are only now starting to bite the white man in the butt (thanks, no less, to a conservative judge: Gorsuch majority opinion here).

2) Africans were always bound to be a small minority in this carefully manicured country - and even the core of the argument for abolition in the first 100 years was impelled by fears of what might happen if blacks outnumbered whites. Even post-Civil-War immigration policy was geared toward maintaining a securely white power structure... it took Anglo/German protestants some adjusting to, but they eventually got with the program. With 2 centuries of systematic terrorization, cultural genocide, economic robbery, and total enslavement replaced by permanent 2nd-class citizenship (except when false incarceration could rob us of that, too), where African Americans are now, on the whole, is roughly where southern black Africans were in the transition periods. In every instance - South Africa last of all - black Africans had numbers, and a largely intact cultural memory of when the white man didn't rule them. Supposing the 2nd deficiency can be overcome... African Americans still don't have the numbers.

3) Because no such revolution can happen in the USA as was bound to happen in post-colonial Africa (and even in S.Africa, where white supremacism made its boldest case), institutions (not the letter of the law, but institutions themselves) change very slowly. We were litigating slavery in this country as late as 1968 - a full century after the question was supposedly settled. Take the mental entrenchment of your own bitter compatriots, and now imagine they had never been forced to share power. That's the USA. American politics, like politics everywhere, is about masking the truth with rhetoric - but what not enough people realize is that the main thing American-style politics is designed to mask, from the end of the Civil War to the present, is that this is a white supremacist system that was never forced to share power. In the post-Obama reality, rhetoric bolsters itself with pretty brown faces, and the ruse continues...

4) Its main advantage is that most Americans are easily swayed by politicians & their media mouthpieces. Take that propaganda - the kind that argues explicitly against progress - and transplant it to almost any other cosmopolitan country: it would fail to fool most of the people most of the time. So the 2nd generalization I don't hesitate to make (the 1st being that the "KKK" in this thread's title is totally appropriate) is that Americans are exceptionally lazy and gullible when thinking about power systems. I can say this having lived on several continents, and in any case expanding my cultural horizons every chance I get, even while living here. American political sophistication is at ground level. It's heartbreaking. (What might be worse is, I see it being exported to middle class professionals the world over - not surprising, given how effectively this culture spreads outward, due to an accident of military positioning.)

...
5) A 5th point is really just a look at the last few election cycles, so... looking outward from a data point, instead of inward through the lens of history. Obama ran as, or was perceived as, a disruptor to that^ system. 2008 election broke records. Eight years later, as many as 8 million Obama voters felt disillusioned by the con, enough to vote for the personification of evil, he who shan't be named. Four years later, with nearly unprecedented organizing by unions and by young BLM activists channeling the momentum of the George Floyd media cycle*, the 2020 presidential election was decided by as few as 43,000 votes - he was barely rebuked. The novel strategy in 2016 was, yes, he who shan't be named marshalled a large number of sleepy racists to vote for the first time... and I'm sure a few tens of thousands in critical states would've made the difference regardless of other factors. But much more impactful was the "8 million" malaise, and the depressed black vote, which I went into some detail in another thread. One could argue this is the entrenched system backfiring on itself - but if the system is geared toward white supremacist power, it's actually working as intended.
(*And tens of millions of emergency mail-in ballots. - edit)

6) The Electoral College: another uniquely American institution expressly designed to preserve white supremacist power. I think in almost any other democracy, the idea that a caretaker council chooses the executive would be laughed off the stage, or, having snuck in, it would've been purged from the system by nonstop riots. It just celebrated its 232nd birthday. (Ref #4 & #7.)

7) The confederate nature of this republic, which makes transforming the US Constitution practically impossible; and an increasingly racist federal court system siding with "states' rights" (the code phrase in defense of slavery antebellum, and of racial state terrorism after the war and since).

Racist bumpkins are everywhere - you're surrounded by them, and so am I. They can be forced to deal with changing circumstances (à la S.Africa) or they can casually prop up a system envisioned by slavers and carefully designed to change only incrementally, and mostly in appearances (à la USA).
Last edited by arugula2 on Jun 05, 2021 5:07 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#106  Postby arugula2 » Jun 05, 2021 1:57 am

^Added: a riff on one of your major points, which is the capitalistic impulse, i.e. people's (and factions') impulse to amass & maintain as much wealth as possible, to the detriment of society at large, and ultimately to the detriment of the species and the planet...

The American version of that impulse, unfortunately, is the same one: in service of white supremacism. Of course, it surprises no one, that the main motivation behind racist politics is property. Even genetic purity (except for a few religious nuts) is subsumed under property. And of course, slaves were "property", says so in the founding documents. Society finds other ways to reclaim lost wealth.
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#107  Postby Agrippina » Jun 05, 2021 5:53 am

mindhack wrote:Wonderful having you back here Agrippina, shooting from the hip your typical informed insightful rants. It’s always been a delight reading your contributions. :)


Thank you mindhack. That's very kind of you. This place is just the medicine I needed to get my mind off my Covid woes. :smoke:
A mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than can a field, however fertile, without cultivation. - Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BCE - 43 BCE)
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#108  Postby Agrippina » Jun 05, 2021 5:55 am

arugula2 wrote:Agrippina, catching up on your posts - lovely reading as ever, tell us when that blog post goes up.

Question: “leave the depot for the cemetery”… that’s a colloquialism? If so, what do you know about it, and when did you start using it?


I'll do that. It has to be something worthy of Hack's website. There's some wonderful reading material there.

That depot thing, one of the old farts came up with it when I mentioned we were moving to a retirement village in 2011. those places, retirement villages are really quiet, not totally unpleasant, but depressing places where old people go to live out their second childhood while they wait to fill a spot in the frail care centre, and then die. And the old people living there love it. Fuck knows why, old people are not children, we have a lot to offer in the way of wisdom, life experience, and now I have a topic for Hack's website. I'll get onto it today.

My husband has always wanted to live among people his own age, and where we would be safe from the continuing home invasions that were happening to us at the place where we lived at the coast. He lived most of his life in Jo'burg (up on the highest elevation in the country - the Witwatersrand) where his family moved to from the coast when he was six. When the last of the children moved out and my mother died, we sold up and took ourselves on a long, extended holiday down to the sea to live. One of my sisters came with us. She was alone, and homeless, didn't have a home, and we couldn't accommodate her, so we bought a big place with a flat for her in the garden. This was 2004. In 2008 an agent told me they had a buyer for us that would've doubled the price we paid for the place, and some, making us rather well off but he said no, he wanted to stay in the big house. Then the crash of 2008 happened, and house prices dropped and we lost our chance to be multiple rand millionaires.

We took ourselves off on a trip to the UK, spent a week with my eldest and his wife who were living in Scotland while he started his Phd at Edinburgh university where his grandfather had done his medical studies during WWI, but they had run out of money. He couldn't afford the fees anymore, not being able to find part time work, and there was nothing for her except making sandwiches. It's a huge culture shock to South Africans to find that working abroad for light skinned people isn't the same as it is in South Africa. We're spoilt. She's an expert at the work she does, and he'd been working at his university since he started his studies in the 1990s. So they were a little surprised when they couldn't find their choice of employment in Scotland, and had decided to come back, so he could finish his work at a university here, and she could go back to earning doing what she knows.

We didn't know that, so they stayed with us at our holiday place in Perthshire for a week, while we paid to travel around Scotland, and then they flew home while we did England. On our return, back to our home, we decided to sell. Grandchildren were starting to arrive, and I wanted to be with them. But my DH insisted he wanted to be with people his own age, so we compromised and moved to a retirement village inland, near the Drakensberg, halfway from Jo'burg to where we used to live, after my sister announced she hated living at the coast and wanted her kids, so she left (and that's another horror story). We sold up, made a small profit and moved into a tiny cottage in the mountains. I hated it. he had his activities, and boy do they keep the old folks busy with games of every sort, variants of canasta, and all the new age old folks exercise games you can imagine. He played bowls, started a drama club, played canasta three times a week, and I sat at home, joined this group of friends, and wrote a book (well three books actually) after someone here told me to "read the Bible you'll find Jesus". Yeah right. If I was an atheist before, I became a rabid theist hunter and thousands of posts later, learnt that I was capable of beating theists with their bullshit.

But living in the retirement village was beginning to take its toll. I don't do well with people in the real world, especially people who do the "hello, I've come for tea" while I'm in the middle of analysing Job, or trying to make sense of Revelations. I finished the manuscript, published the books, and became bored. The more bored I became, the more introverted, and unhappy, and depressed I drowned in, and to relieve the boredom, I made himself take me around South Africa on long car trips. In 2014 we did a trip across Africa. Took a week to travel from our mountains in the west to Cape Town, stopping every day to sleep in a new B&B and to experience the places I'd never seen, well he hadn't either. Then our car began to give us a little trouble, costing us rather large amounts of money, so we sold it, and one of our "friends" recommended we buy an Audi from some relative of a relative of hers. We fell for the scam, bought the damn thing, and exhausted all our spare funds in getting it repaired enough to do another trip, which never happened because with a credit card up to the hilt, and an overdraft, we were broke, and I was on the verge of suicide. Then we decided to come back here, with my child in trouble due to his own breakdowns from pressure we autists simply can't handle, and I had my reasoon to sell the bloody Audi, to finance a move and we sold the cottage and came back to a 100 year old house filled with my late ex's parents' antiques and family memories. The sale of the cottage relieved some of our financial woes, but left me bitter and filled with depression that I'd been fooled into thinking I'd finally been able to make a real friend. Last year, when the George Floyd thing happened, we had a blow up off mega proportions, I broke down, especially given that I had a new grandchild I couldn't know because she was growing and developing while I missed all of that due to the lockdown, and the "friend" pressuring me into "but what diid I do wrong", my head exploded.

Now with the help of husband and my wonderful son who recovered enough to add a law degree to his already overloaded qualifications, the eldest having achieved his PhD, and the lifting of some restrictions, I can look back at the six years I spent trying to fit into a society that simply wasn't my cup of tea, as they say. Retirement villages are wonderful for the gregarious types who want to hold onto their youth while their children visit them in school breaks and bring the grandchildren to be babysat while they work, when then can't be with the kids on their breaks four times a year, but my kids have lives arranged to fit their children into their lives. They are able to leave them with the other grandparents two of whom are younger and mentally more stable to deal with two hyperactive girls, and they let me see them whenever I feel I'm up to it, or they simply work from home. They understand my mental issues so they fit in the kids whenever I'm not in the throes of another wobbly.

I realise now it's trying to be "normal" that breaks me. I'm not "normal" I have a 40 year old mind in a 70 something body. I've always hated fitting in to where there's noise, lights, crowds of people, and idiotic conversations about the weather and how much rain we had last night. I refuse to do that now. As I walk towards death, I'm doing it on my terms. If I feel like spending the day playing house flipper on my computer, or writing long posts like this, I do it, or I watch Game of Thrones one more time while I knit. My life, my choice, my arrangements and the world full of old people who call themselves "77 years young" can quite frankly go fuck itself. I don't care.

So that's the story of how I came to meet this group of fun people, who don't come for tea, but who I enjoy when I meet them because they have the same issues with the god-botherers that I do, and I've told this the long way because today it's three years ago that I came home to where I belong.
A mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than can a field, however fertile, without cultivation. - Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BCE - 43 BCE)
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#109  Postby Seabass » Jun 27, 2021 6:04 am

The Biden administration is rolling out a new strategy to counter domestic terrorism. One of the initiative's top aims is to confront racism and bigotry -- long the primary drivers of homegrown extremism. Award-winning historian and author Kathleen Belew, a professor at the University of Chicago, speaks with Michel Martin about violence and militarization in American society and how to combat it.


The White Power Movement: A Direct Line Between Vietnam and Jan. 6 | Amanpour and Company
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#110  Postby Seabass » Jun 27, 2021 7:15 pm

FYI when the author refers to "Radical Republicans" he's talking about the abolitionist faction of the Republican party pre-Civil War.

The Cruel Logic of the Republican Party, Before and After Trump

Donald Trump has claimed credit for any number of things he benefited from but did not create, and the Republican Party’s reigning ideology is one of them: a politics of cruelty and exclusion that strategically exploits vulnerable Americans by portraying them as an existential threat, against whom acts of barbarism and disenfranchisement become not only justified but worthy of celebration. This approach has a long history in American politics. The most consistent threat to our democracy has always been the drive of some leaders to restrict its blessings to a select few.

This is why Joe Biden beat Mr. Trump but has not vanquished Trumpism. Mr. Trump’s main innovation was showing Republicans how much they could get away with, from shattering migrant families and banning Muslim travelers to valorizing war crimes and denigrating African, Latino and Caribbean immigrants as being from “shithole countries.” Republicans have responded with zeal, even in the aftermath of his loss, with Republican-controlled legislatures targeting constituencies they identify either with Democrats or with the rapid cultural change that conservatives hope to arrest. The most significant for democracy, however, are the election laws designed to insulate Republican power from a diverse American majority that Republicans fear no longer supports them. The focus on Mr. Trump’s — admittedly shocking — idiosyncrasies has obscured the broader logic of this strategy.

After more than a decade in which Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton provided fruitful targets for an audience fearful of cultural change, conservative media has struggled to turn the older white president who goes to Mass every Sunday into a compelling villain. Yet the apocalypse remains nigh, threatened by the presence of those Americans they consider unworthy of the name.

On Fox News, hosts warn that Democrats want to “replace the current electorate” with “more obedient voters from the third world.” In outlets like National Review, columnists justify disenfranchisement of liberal constituencies on the grounds that “it would be far better if the franchise were not exercised by ignorant, civics-illiterate people.” Trumpist redoubts like the Claremont Institute publish hysterical jeremiads warning that “most people living in the United States today — certainly more than half — are not Americans in any meaningful sense of the term.”

Under such an ideology, depriving certain Americans of their fundamental rights is not wrong but praiseworthy, because such people are usurpers.

*

The origin of this politics can arguably be found in the aftermath of the Civil War, when Radical Republicans sought to build a multiracial democracy from the ashes of the Confederacy. That effort was destroyed when white Southerners severed emancipated Black Americans from the franchise, eliminating the need to win their votes or respect their rights. The founders had embedded protections for slavery in the Constitution, but it was only after the abolition war, during what the historian Eric Foner calls the Second Founding, that nonracial citizenship became possible.

The former Confederates had failed to build a slave empire, but they would not accept the demise of white man’s government. As the former Confederate general and subsequent six-term senator from Alabama John T. Morgan wrote in 1890, democratic sovereignty in America was conferred upon “qualified voters,” and Black men, whom he accused of “hatred and ill will toward their former owners,” did not qualify and were destroying democracy by their mere participation. Disenfranchising them, therefore, was not merely justified but an act of self-defense protecting democracy against “Negro domination.”

In order to wield power as they wanted, without having to appeal to Black men for their votes, the Democratic Party and its paramilitary allies adopted a theory of liberty and democracy premised on exclusion. Such a politics must constantly maintain the ramparts between the despised and the elevated. This requires fresh acts of cruelty not only to remind everyone of their proper place but also to sustain the sense of impending doom that justifies these acts.

As the historian C. Vann Woodward wrote, years after the end of Reconstruction, Southern Democrats engaged in “intensive propaganda of white supremacy, Negrophobia and race chauvinism” to purge Black men from politics forever, shattering emerging alliances between white and Black workers. This was ruthless opportunism, but it also forged a community defined by the color line and destroyed one that might have transcended it.

The Radical Republicans believed the ballot would be the ultimate defense against white supremacy. The reverse was also true: Severed from that defense, Black voters were disarmed. Without Black votes at stake, the party of Lincoln was no longer motivated to defend Black rights.

*

Contemporary Republicans are far less violent and racist than the Democrats of the Reconstruction era and the Gilded Age. But they have nevertheless adopted the same political logic, that the victories of the rival party are illegitimate, wrought by fraud, coercion or the support of ignorant voters who are not truly American. It is no coincidence that Mr. Obama’s rise to power began with a lyrical tribute to all that red and blue states had in common and that Mr. Trump’s began with him saying Mr. Obama was born in Kenya.

In this environment, cruelty — in the form of demonizing religious and ethnic minorities as terrorists, criminals and invaders — is an effective political tool for crushing one’s enemies as well as for cultivating a community that conceives of fellow citizens as a threat, resident foreigners attempting to supplant “real” Americans. For those who believe this, it is no violation of American or democratic principles to disenfranchise, marginalize and dispossess those who never should have had such rights to begin with, people you are convinced want to destroy you.

Their conviction in this illegitimacy is intimately tied to the Democratic Party’s reliance on Black votes. As Mr. Trump announced in November, “Detroit and Philadelphia — known as two of the most corrupt political places anywhere in our country, easily — cannot be responsible for engineering the outcome of a presidential race.” The Republican Party maintains this conviction despite Mr. Trump’s meaningful gains among voters of color in 2020.

Even as Republicans seek to engineer state and local election rules in their favor, they accuse the Democrats of attempting to rig elections by ensuring the ballot is protected. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, who encouraged the mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6 with his claims that the 2020 election had been stolen, tells brazen falsehoods proclaiming that voting rights measures will “register millions of illegal aliens to vote” and describes them as “Jim Crow 2.0.”

But there are no Democratic proposals to disenfranchise Republicans. There are no plans to deny gun owners the ballot, to disenfranchise white men without a college education, to consolidate rural precincts to make them unreachable. This is not because Democrats or liberals are inherently less cruel. It is because parties reliant on diverse coalitions to wield power will seek to win votes rather than suppress them.

These kinds of falsehoods cannot be contested on factual grounds because they represent ideological beliefs about who is American and who is not and therefore who can legitimately wield power. The current Democratic administration is as illegitimate to much of the Republican base as the Reconstruction governments were to Morgan.


continued:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/26/opinion/trump-republican-party.html
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#111  Postby Seabass » Jul 01, 2021 7:36 pm


Opinion | I've Been a Critical Race Theorist for 30 Years. Our Opponents Are Just Proving Our Point For Us.

Some 25 states have already enacted or are considering laws to ban teaching what they call “critical race theory” (“CRT”) in public schools, a concept that school officials around the country deny they even teach. A parents’ group in Washoe County, Nevada wants teachers to wear body cams, just to make sure. And Ted Cruz just charged that CRT is “every bit as racist as the klansmen in white sheets.”

As a law professor closely associated with the critical race theory movement for more than 30 years, I am astonished. Most academic work never gets noticed at all, and ours is being publicly vilified, even banned. While we wrote footnotes and taught our classes, did our ideas become the new orthodoxy in American society and the foundation of K-12 education, as our critics charge?

Hardly.

CRT is not a racialist ideology that declares all whites to be privileged oppressors, and CRT is not taught in public schools.

But over the past nine months or so, first slowly in right-wing media conversation and now quickly in state houses and even mainstream newspapers, conservative activists have branded all race reform efforts in education and employment as CRT—a disinformation campaign designed to rally disaffected middle- and working-class white people against progressive change.

If you understand what CRT actually is, though, it’s easy to see that it has nothing to do with the cartoonish picture of reverse racism that its critics depict. And, more importantly, CRT is a pretty good lens for understanding why the campaign against it has been able to spread so fast.

CRT, in the real world, describes the diverse work of a small group of scholars who write about the shortcomings of conventional civil rights approaches to understanding and transforming racial power in American society. It’s a complex critique that wouldn’t fit easily into a K-12 curriculum. Even law students find the ideas challenging; we ourselves struggle to put it in understandable terms. We embrace no simple or orthodox set of principles, so no one can really be “trained” in CRT. And if teachers were able to teach such analytically difficult ideas to public school students, it should be a cause for wild celebration, not denunciation.

The common starting point of our analysis is that racial power was not eliminated by the successes of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. That movement succeeded in ending the system of blatant segregation reflected in the “Whites Only” and “Colored” signs that once marked everyday life in America—but in its wake, in the 70s and the 80s, racial-justice reform in countless institutions was halted by old-guard resistance.


continued: https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2021/06/30/critical-race-theory-lightning-rod-opinion-497046
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#112  Postby hackenslash » Jul 01, 2021 8:52 pm

You couldn't teach critical race theory at K-12; it would belike teaching a kindergartner astrophysics - Michael Harrington
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#113  Postby felltoearth » Jul 03, 2021 8:08 pm

Seabass wrote:
So far this year, GOP lawmakers in 32 states have introduced over 80 anti-protest bills. This segment is a round-up of those bills, from the ones that could take your student loans to the ones that could make it a crime to taunt a cop. It explores the GOP’s go-to way of responding to protests: making them a crime.




Note:

96.3% of BLM protests had no property damage.
97.7% of BLM protests had no reported injuries.

I’d appreciate a source for this as I would love to use this stat.
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#114  Postby Seabass » Jul 03, 2021 10:23 pm

The stat's in the video. I don't know if it's their stat or someone else's.
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#115  Postby arugula2 » Jul 04, 2021 7:44 am

felltoearth wrote:I’d appreciate a source for this as I would love to use this stat.

Erica Chenoweth (Harvard) & Jeremy Pressman (U.Conn). Summary of their study here, which looked at
...data from May to June [2020], having already documented 7,305 events in thousands of towns and cities in all 50 states and D.C., involving millions of attendees

...and concluded that
Only 3.7% of the protests involved property damage or vandalism. Some portion of these involved neither police nor protesters, but people engaging in vandalism or looting alongside the protests.

In short, our data suggest that 96.3% of events involved no property damage or police injuries, and in 97.7% of events, no injuries were reported among participants, bystanders or police.

They define terms & participants in the in-between paragraphs.
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#116  Postby arugula2 » Jul 04, 2021 6:59 pm

It's an interesting paradox... which way the "BLM protests" push passive spectators. If the protests are perceived as violent & the audience reacts negatively, it could still go either way, toward reform or toward repression. Probably both, since the people that need persuading aren't very thoughtful - so the only question is how to manage perceptions to get the most humane outcome. Unfortunately, since both the sympathetic & reactionary types care mostly about their own property, and do not care enough about anyone outside their social groups, the more 'threatening' the amorphous mob seems to their precious belongings, the more likely they endorse a long-term solution that precludes another protest event. It's the same story everywhere... nothing speaks louder than a persistent backlash against injustice, even if it's coupled with a pacifist brand (like BLM). There's no MLK without X, etc.
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#117  Postby Seabass » Jul 21, 2021 10:49 am

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/07/three-tropes-white-victimhood/619463/



3 Tropes of White Victimhood

Leading conservative pundits today are pounding themes that were popular among opponents of Reconstruction.

By Lawrence Glickman

About the author: Lawrence B. Glickman is a history professor at Cornell University. He is the author, most recently, of Free Enterprise: An American History.


In the conservative world, the idea that white people in the United States are under siege has become doctrine. In recent weeks, three prominent figures have each offered their own versions of this tenet.

In June, Brian Kilmeade, one of the hosts of Fox & Friends, claimed that activists were “trying to take down white culture.”

Also in June, Tucker Carlson, speaking on his nightly show with an anti-white mania graphic in the background, implied that racial strife was imminent and asked: “How do we save this country before we become Rwanda?”

The same month, Pat Robertson, a former Republican presidential candidate and the host of the Christian Broadcasting Network’s flagship show, The 700 Club, said that militants are telling “people of color … to rise up and overtake their oppressors.” He worried that, “having gotten the whip handle—if I can use the term,” people of color were now in a position “to instruct their white neighbors how to behave.” Robertson warned that if this trend continues, “America is over. It is just that simple.”

Kilmeade, Carlson, and Robertson all blamed critical race theory, a school of legal thought developed in the 1980s that has become the latest fixation of the conservative outrage machine. But the panic they expressed has a much longer history, with roots going back to white-supremacist rhetoric from before the Civil War—and particularly apparent during the attack on Reconstruction, America’s experiment in interracial democracy that lasted from 1865 until 1877.

Indeed, each of the three pundits expressed a key strand of the rhetoric of racial reaction that was pervasive among critics of Reconstruction: Carlson deployed inversion, by which white people declare reverse racism or anti-whiteness to be the crucial problem of prejudice and white people to be uniquely oppressed as a result of excessive power granted to Black Americans; Robertson deployed projection, in which white people assert that they will be treated the way they treated Black people during the Jim Crow era; and Kilmeade deployed victimization, as when a white southerner in 1875 described his region as “stripped of her honors, her glory, her pride … trampled into dust” by recently enacted laws.

These tropes of inversion, projection, and victimization overlap. During the Reconstruction era, and long afterward, white reactionaries in both the South and the North projected that the movement for racial equality was animated by what the Confederate-nostalgic newspaper The Watchman and Southron called a “hatred of the white people of the South and a determination to humiliate them as much as possible.” Using the language of inversion and victimization in 1875, the Louisville Courier-Journal—which was associated with the anti-Reconstruction Democratic Party—described Reconstruction as a “scheme of upturning society and placing the bottom on top: an effort to legislate the African into an Anglo-Saxon.”

Here it is worth pausing to state the obvious: Nothing akin to what the Mississippi politician John D. Freeman called in 1868 “negro superiority and supremacy” ever happened—or was ever even close to happening. Although many white people like Freeman maintained that Reconstruction would inevitably culminate with their being “enslaved and crushed out of civil and political existence,” the goal of Reconstruction was not oppression. It was racial equality.

continued:
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/07/three-tropes-white-victimhood/619463/
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Re: AmeriKKKa

#118  Postby Seabass » Jul 29, 2021 12:41 am

John Oliver breaks down the long history of housing discrimination in the U.S., the damage it’s done, and, crucially, what we can do about it.

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Re: AmeriKKKa

#119  Postby Seabass » Aug 02, 2021 12:28 am

[Heather] McGhee discusses her powerful book, The Sum of Us, about how white people have been told that anything that benefits people of color hurts them - i.e. a zero-sum game. It ain't true!


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Re: AmeriKKKa

#120  Postby Beatrice » Aug 02, 2021 1:45 am

Thanks for that link Seabass,
I've just finished reading The Sum of Us, it made me realize how white supremacy affects absolutely everything, every little nook and cranny of American society is infected.
(I'm not giving a pass to New Zealand either, colonization has left its ugly scars here too.)
Anyway, Heather McGhee is a powerful and eloquent teacher.
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