Republican Watch

People who say "Democrats are as bad as Republicans" are almost as bad as Republicans.

For discussion of politics, and what's going on in the world today.

Moderators: kiore, The_Metatron, Blip

Re: Republican Watch

#1921  Postby Seabass » Jun 02, 2021 11:20 pm

Spearthrower wrote:Stupidity isn't partisan.

It certainly seems to lean right.
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1922  Postby Spearthrower » Jun 02, 2021 11:39 pm

Violent insurrection... can be an effective approach to upholding the principle of limited government.


It's really only incisive satire like this that ever provokes an explosive laugh for me.
I'm not an atheist; I just don't believe in gods :- that which I don't belong to isn't a group!
Religion: Mass Stockholm Syndrome

Learn Stuff. Stuff good. https://www.coursera.org/
User avatar
Spearthrower
 
Posts: 31167
Age: 46
Male

Country: Thailand
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1923  Postby Spearthrower » Jun 03, 2021 12:00 am

Seabass wrote:
Spearthrower wrote:Stupidity isn't partisan.

It certainly seems to lean right.


Yeah, but no but! I was being flippant and I know you are too, but it is a serious point that should be unpacked a little.

Firstly, we're obviously going to have the primary problem of induction. Our suite of experiences from which to draw on to form this idea is necessarily coloured by many events unique to us which may, or may not, be statistically relevant. It's possible we've seen statistically sufficient quantities of left, right, and other to actually fairly determine this, but it's unlikely we were employing any sound methodological analysis throughout the collection of that data! :grin:

Then there are some topics where the point of disagreement is not a question of knowledge but of incompatible values, and all parties feeling that their values are reasonable and rational. It does sometimes seem stupid that the other side would focus on some short-term benefit when the long-term outcome is bad - for example - but it's not actually a deficiency of understanding that's preventing them from agreeing, it's that they place more importance on something different.

Next, we have to remember to be aware of the smorgasbord of cognitive biases - for example, holding out-groups to a different standard than in-groups. If you subscribe to X principles and see a person of X principles ranting drivel, you're more able to dismiss as not reflecting on the wider group, but see someone of Y principles ranting drivel, they become essentialized as Y principles.

Finally, determining intelligence is a project fraught with problems even in the most clinical setting. I can't go into details here as it would take dozens more paragraphs to do justice, but the main issue is the difficulty in controlling variables and non-causal correlations. Even in an uncluttered spherical cow in a vacuum setting, measuring intelligence is a mine-field of biases.
I'm not an atheist; I just don't believe in gods :- that which I don't belong to isn't a group!
Religion: Mass Stockholm Syndrome

Learn Stuff. Stuff good. https://www.coursera.org/
User avatar
Spearthrower
 
Posts: 31167
Age: 46
Male

Country: Thailand
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1924  Postby Alan C » Jun 04, 2021 8:32 am

It looks like Republicans, more than ever, are not about increasing outreach but outrage. It's not looking that good from the outside looking in. Current and would-be autocrats around the world are probably feeling quite optimistic about this dangerous farce of a party.
Lose it - it means go crazy, nuts, insane, bonzo, no longer in possession of one's faculties, three fries short of a happy meal, WACKO!! - Jack O'Neill
User avatar
Alan C
 
Posts: 2833
Age: 45
Male

New Zealand (nz)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1925  Postby chango369 » Jun 05, 2021 12:01 pm

Here's Oregon State Rep. Mike Nearman, giving out his real number a few days before he helped armed protestors breach the Oregon State Capitol.

“Government is the Entertainment division of the military-industrial complex.”

Frank Zappa
User avatar
chango369
 
Name: Chris
Posts: 1857
Age: 62
Male

Country: думфукистан
Cuba (cu)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1926  Postby The_Piper » Jun 06, 2021 1:01 pm

Time to update the charges to reflect this. Saying you don't know anything about it, while signaling that you do and will help and call you personally, isn't covering his ass like he thinks it is. Modern Republicans are wanton criminals who have no clue how to be discreet about it. Hopefully the Oregon justice system has the balls that the US DOJ clearly lacks.
"There are two ways to view the stars; as they really are, and as we might wish them to be." - Carl Sagan
"If an argument lasts more than five minutes, both parties are wrong" unknown
Self Taken Pictures of Wildlife
User avatar
The_Piper
 
Name: Fletch F. Fletch
Posts: 29623
Age: 47
Male

Country: Chainsaw Country
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1927  Postby Seabass » Jun 07, 2021 6:40 pm

:rofl:

This fuckin' guy serves on a House subcommittee that has something to do with cybersecurity. And yes, this is the same Mo Brooks who once said that rising sea levels are caused by rocks falling into the sea.


Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) lashed out on Twitter Sunday afternoon when his wife was served with a subpoena for Rep. Eric Swalwell's (D-CA) civil lawsuit. Brooks ranted on Twitter that the subpoena was illegally served because the process server was caught "sneaking into my house and accosting my wife."

In the course of his rant and need to post a screen capture of the penalties of illegally trespassing, Brooks accidentally posted his PIN number and the password to his Gmail account, which are taped under his screen on his laptop.


https://www.rawstory.com/mo-brooks-low-cyber-security/

Image
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1928  Postby The_Piper » Jun 07, 2021 7:44 pm

He really nailed it.
whoosh.gif
whoosh.gif (1.26 MiB) Viewed 722 times

:lol: :picard:
"There are two ways to view the stars; as they really are, and as we might wish them to be." - Carl Sagan
"If an argument lasts more than five minutes, both parties are wrong" unknown
Self Taken Pictures of Wildlife
User avatar
The_Piper
 
Name: Fletch F. Fletch
Posts: 29623
Age: 47
Male

Country: Chainsaw Country
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1929  Postby Seabass » Jun 07, 2021 10:34 pm

After harassing people celebrating Pride their boat burst into flames. Guess who saved them?

Harassing people is gross, no matter who they are. Harassing people who are flying rainbow flags expressing support for LGBTQIA+ people is particularly gross, considering the fact they are advocating for basic civil rights and human dignity. And evidently, harassing people who are flying Pride flags while boating is egregiously gross enough to piss off Poseidon and bring the heavy hammer of karma down upon your heads.

Or maybe it's just a coincidence. Either way, this story shows that bigotry is no match for being the bigger person and that even if it ends up being a one-way street, caring about the well-being of our fellow humans is always the right thing to do.

While boating in Moses Lake, Washington last weekend, a group of boaters flying Pride flags found themselves confronted by three people in another boat. At first, they thought perhaps the boaters were coming up to express support for their rainbow flags, but it soon became apparent that wasn't the case. As the boat circled around them, one of the passengers gave the Pride-flag flyers the middle finger, and the boaters allegedly shouted gay slurs as well.

Then the bigots' boat caught fire and the people they were harassing ended up rescuing them after they jumped ship.

The story was told by Robbie on Twitter, who shared photos and video of the incident as well as issuing a statement to The Washington Post.

Robbie, a queer trans man who has withheld his name for fear of retaliation, told The Post that his family had spent the day swimming and tubing on the lake and stopped their boat around 7:00pm. A small vessel sped toward them, then circled around them at least six times, with the woman on the boat flipping them off and yelling something about "gays" and "flags."

When the boat driver noticed that Robbie's brother had started filming them, he tried to hide his face and drove away. Moments later, a loud bang came from the boat, and a plume of black smoke rose into the air.

"Holy crap!" said Robbie's brother. "They blew up!" Then he drove toward the boaters who were swimming away from their burning boat and brought them aboard.

Of course, having your boat catch on fire in the middle of a lake is a terrible thing to have happen. Some might say it's as terrible as having people going out of their way to harass you in the middle of a lake. Karma works in interesting ways.

It would be lovely to be able to share that the harassers had a wake-up call and apologized for their horrible behavior, but alas, they did not.

"The passengers were quite rude, shouting over us, ignoring my [inquiries] about their well-being when on the 911 call and smoking a Vape pen on our boat without even so much as asking if they could; several passengers of our boat have asthma," Robbie told The Post.

Police came to put out the fire, and the bigoted boaters' friends came to pick them up. When they left, they didn't even say 'Thank you" for the rescue.




https://www.upworthy.com/boaters-flying-pride-flag-help-people-who-harassed-them
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1930  Postby The_Piper » Jun 08, 2021 12:41 am

I saw a video report of that, but didn't know about their behavior after being rescued. Some people can learn and change, others are asshats and will always be asshats. What a bummer. We could reach the stars someday, but we probably won't. :shifty:
"There are two ways to view the stars; as they really are, and as we might wish them to be." - Carl Sagan
"If an argument lasts more than five minutes, both parties are wrong" unknown
Self Taken Pictures of Wildlife
User avatar
The_Piper
 
Name: Fletch F. Fletch
Posts: 29623
Age: 47
Male

Country: Chainsaw Country
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1931  Postby Seabass » Jun 08, 2021 7:51 pm

Conservatives: "Immigrants bring sickness and disease and filth!"
Also conservatives: "Nah, I won't get vaccinated, science is for gays and liberals!"

Vaccination rates are lagging behind in several Southern states, prompting fear of another surge in coronavirus cases.

"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1932  Postby Seabass » Jun 09, 2021 8:21 pm

"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1933  Postby Seabass » Jun 09, 2021 8:25 pm


‘I don’t believe in evolution, I believe in God’: Marjorie Taylor Greene argues Covid escaped from Wuhan lab


Conservative firebrand Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene leaned on religion in an attempt to argue that the coronavirus pandemic was released from a Wuhan lab, and not introduced into the population via an animal at a “wet market” in China.

Appearing on Steve Bannon’s Real America’s Voice podcast on Tuesday, Ms Greene lashed out at President Biden’s top medical adviser, Dr Anthony Fauci, and called Covid-19 a “bioweapon” that she believes was unleashed from the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

Ms Greene said she didn’t support so-called “gain-of-function research”, where lab technicians will take a virus and tweak it in order to develop vaccines and other medications.

“I don’t buy it because I don’t believe in evolution. I don’t believe in that type of so-called ‘science’. I don’t believe in evolution, I believe in God,” she said, using air quotes to emphasise her point.




https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/marjorie-taylor-greene-wuhan-lab-coronavirus-b1862672.html
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1934  Postby Alan C » Jun 11, 2021 12:08 am

The_Piper wrote:I saw a video report of that, but didn't know about their behavior after being rescued. Some people can learn and change, others are asshats and will always be asshats. What a bummer. We could reach the stars someday, but we probably won't. :shifty:


Idiocracy is looking more and more prophetic by the week.
Lose it - it means go crazy, nuts, insane, bonzo, no longer in possession of one's faculties, three fries short of a happy meal, WACKO!! - Jack O'Neill
User avatar
Alan C
 
Posts: 2833
Age: 45
Male

New Zealand (nz)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1935  Postby chango369 » Jun 11, 2021 10:27 am

Buh bye now. :thumbup:

Nearman refused to resign in the face of overwhelming evidence he would be ejected from the Legislature. The four-term Republican lawmaker becomes the first person ever expelled from the Oregon House.


Oregon House expels state Rep. Mike Nearman, plotter of Capitol incursion
“Government is the Entertainment division of the military-industrial complex.”

Frank Zappa
User avatar
chango369
 
Name: Chris
Posts: 1857
Age: 62
Male

Country: думфукистан
Cuba (cu)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1936  Postby The_Piper » Jun 11, 2021 7:58 pm

Har-har. Now for the handcuffs. Because justice. Matters. / Glenn Kirschner. :dopey:
"There are two ways to view the stars; as they really are, and as we might wish them to be." - Carl Sagan
"If an argument lasts more than five minutes, both parties are wrong" unknown
Self Taken Pictures of Wildlife
User avatar
The_Piper
 
Name: Fletch F. Fletch
Posts: 29623
Age: 47
Male

Country: Chainsaw Country
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1937  Postby Seabass » Jun 13, 2021 12:41 am

https://www.newamerica.org/political-reform/statements/statement-of-concern/

Statement of Concern

The Threats to American Democracy and the Need for National Voting and Election Administration Standards

STATEMENT

June 1, 2021

We, the undersigned, are scholars of democracy who have watched the recent deterioration of U.S. elections and liberal democracy with growing alarm. Specifically, we have watched with deep concern as Republican-led state legislatures across the country have in recent months proposed or implemented what we consider radical changes to core electoral procedures in response to unproven and intentionally destructive allegations of a stolen election. Collectively, these initiatives are transforming several states into political systems that no longer meet the minimum conditions for free and fair elections. Hence, our entire democracy is now at risk.

When democracy breaks down, it typically takes many years, often decades, to reverse the downward spiral. In the process, violence and corruption typically flourish, and talent and wealth flee to more stable countries, undermining national prosperity. It is not just our venerated institutions and norms that are at risk—it is our future national standing, strength, and ability to compete globally.

Statutory changes in large key electoral battleground states are dangerously politicizing the process of electoral administration, with Republican-controlled legislatures giving themselves the power to override electoral outcomes on unproven allegations should Democrats win more votes. They are seeking to restrict access to the ballot, the most basic principle underlying the right of all adult American citizens to participate in our democracy. They are also putting in place criminal sentences and fines meant to intimidate and scare away poll workers and nonpartisan administrators. State legislatures have advanced initiatives that curtail voting methods now preferred by Democratic-leaning constituencies, such as early voting and mail voting. Republican lawmakers have openly talked about ensuring the “purity” and “quality” of the vote, echoing arguments widely used across the Jim Crow South as reasons for restricting the Black vote.

State legislators supporting these changes have cited the urgency of “electoral integrity” and the need to ensure that elections are secure and free of fraud. But by multiple expert judgments, the 2020 election was extremely secure and free of fraud. The reason that Republican voters have concerns is because many Republican officials, led by former President Donald Trump, have manufactured false claims of fraud, claims that have been repeatedly rejected by courts of law, and which Trump’s own lawyers have acknowledged were mere speculation when they testified about them before judges.

In future elections, these laws politicizing the administration and certification of elections could enable some state legislatures or partisan election officials to do what they failed to do in 2020: reverse the outcome of a free and fair election. Further, these laws could entrench extended minority rule, violating the basic and longstanding democratic principle that parties that get the most votes should win elections.

Democracy rests on certain elemental institutional and normative conditions. Elections must be neutrally and fairly administered. They must be free of manipulation. Every citizen who is qualified must have an equal right to vote, unhindered by obstruction. And when they lose elections, political parties and their candidates and supporters must be willing to accept defeat and acknowledge the legitimacy of the outcome. The refusal of prominent Republicans to accept the outcome of the 2020 election, and the anti-democratic laws adopted (or approaching adoption) in Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Montana and Texas—and under serious consideration in other Republican-controlled states—violate these principles. More profoundly, these actions call into question whether the United States will remain a democracy. As scholars of democracy, we condemn these actions in the strongest possible terms as a betrayal of our precious democratic heritage.

The most effective remedy for these anti-democratic laws at the state level is federal action to protect equal access of all citizens to the ballot and to guarantee free and fair elections. Just as it ultimately took federal voting rights law to put an end to state-led voter suppression laws throughout the South, so federal law must once again ensure that American citizens’ voting rights do not depend on which party or faction happens to be dominant in their state legislature, and that votes are cast and counted equally, regardless of the state or jurisdiction in which a citizen happens to live. This is widely recognized as a fundamental principle of electoral integrity in democracies around the world.

A new voting rights law (such as that proposed in the John Lewis Voting Rights Act) is essential but alone is not enough. True electoral integrity demands a comprehensive set of national standards that ensure the sanctity and independence of election administration, guarantee that all voters can freely exercise their right to vote, prevent partisan gerrymandering from giving dominant parties in the states an unfair advantage in the process of drawing congressional districts, and regulate ethics and money in politics.

It is always far better for major democracy reforms to be bipartisan, to give change the broadest possible legitimacy. However, in the current hyper-polarized political context such broad bipartisan support is sadly lacking. Elected Republican leaders have had numerous opportunities to repudiate Trump and his “Stop the Steal” crusade, which led to the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6. Each time, they have sidestepped the truth and enabled the lie to spread.

We urge members of Congress to do whatever is necessary—including suspending the filibuster—in order to pass national voting and election administration standards that both guarantee the vote to all Americans equally, and prevent state legislatures from manipulating the rules in order to manufacture the result they want. Our democracy is fundamentally at stake. History will judge what we do at this moment.

Signatures are still being added. This list was last updated on 6/11/21 at 1:30 p.m. ET.

John Aldrich
Professor of Political Science
Duke University

Robert Alexander
Professor of Political Science
Ohio Northern University

Barry Ames
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
University of Pittsburgh

Deborah Avant
Professor of International Studies
University of Denver

Julia Azari
Associate Professor of Political Science
Marquette University

Larry M. Bartels
Professor of Political Science
Vanderbilt University

Robert V. Bartlett
Professor of the Liberal Arts
University of Vermont

John Baughman
Associate Professor of Politics
Bates College

Frank R. Baumgartner
Professor of Political Science
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Christopher Beem
Managing Director, McCourtney Institute for Democracy
Penn State University

Caroline Beer
Professor of Political Science
University of Vermont

Jonathan Bendor
Professor of Political Economy
Stanford University

Michael Berkman
Professor of Political Science
Penn State University

Sheri Berman
Professor of Political Science
Barnard College, Columbia University

Benjamin Bishin
Professor of Political Science
University of California, Riverside

Robert Blair
Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs
Brown University

Steffen Blings
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
Utah State University

Henry E. Brady
Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy
University of California, Berkeley

Alejandro Trelles
Assistant Professor of Politics
Brandeis University

Rogers Brubaker
Professor of Sociology
University of California, Los Angeles

Eileen Burgin
Professor of Political Science
University of Vermont

John M. Carey
Professor of Government
Dartmouth College

Ryan E. Carlin
Professor of Political Science
Georgia State University

Daniel Carpenter
Professor of Government
Harvard University

Michael Chwe
Professor and Chair, Political Science
University of California, Los Angeles

David B. Cohen
Professor of Political Science
University of Akron

Joshua Cohen
Senior Fellow in Law, Philosophy, and Political Science
University of California, Berkeley

Mark Copelovitch
Professor of Political Science & Public Affairs
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Michael Coppedge
Professor of Political Science
University of Notre Dame

Katherine Cramer
Professor of Political Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Larry Diamond
Senior Fellow
Hoover Institution and Freeman Spogli Institute
Stanford University

Chris J. Dolan
Professor of Political Science
Lebanon Valley College

Alan Dowty
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
University of Notre Dame

Daniel W. Drezner
Professor of International Politics
Tufts University

Lee Drutman
Senior Fellow
New America

Rachel Epstein
Professor of International Studies
University of Denver

Christina Ewig
Professor of Public Affairs
University of Minnesota

David Faris
Associate Professor of Political Science
Roosevelt University

John Ferejohn
Professor of Law and Politics
New York University School of Law

Henry Farrell
Professor of International Affairs
Johns Hopkins University

Christina Fattore
Associate Professor of Political Science
West Virginia University

Christopher M. Federico
Professor of Political Science and Psychology
University of Minnesota

Morris P. Fiorina
Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow
Hoover Institution
Stanford University

Frank Fischer
Professor Emeritus of Politics and Global Affairs
Rutgers University

M. Steven Fish
Professor of Political Science
University of California, Berkeley

Dana R. Fisher
Professor of Sociology
University of Maryland

Joel L. Fleishman
Professor of Law and Public Policy Studies
Duke University

Michael D. Floyd
Professor Emeritus, Cumberland School of Law
Samford University

Luis Fraga
Professor of Political Science
University of Notre Dame

William W. Franko
Associate Professor of Political Science
West Virginia University

Robert J. Franzese, Jr.
Professor of Political Science
University of Michigan

Amy Fried
Professor of Political Science
University of Maine

Francis Fukuyama
Senior Fellow
Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Stanford University

Archon Fung
Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government
Harvard University

Daniel J. Galvin
Associate Professor of Political Science
Northwestern University

Laura Gamboa
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Utah

Michael A. Genovese
President, Global Policy Institute
Loyola Marymount university

Anthony “Jack” Gierzynski
Professor and Chair of Political Science
University of Vermont

Martin Gilens
Professor of Public Policy, Political Science, and Social Welfare
University of California, Los Angeles

Kristin Goss
Professor of Public Policy and Political Science
Duke University

Jessica Gottlieb
Associate Professor of Government & Public Service
Texas A&M University

Virginia Gray
Professor of Political Science Emeritus
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Jill S. Greenlee
Associate Professor of Politics
Brandeis University

Jacob M. Grumbach
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Washington

Anna Grzymala-Busse
Professor of International Studies
Stanford University

Deborah Lynn Guber
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Vermont

Jacob Hacker
Professor of Political Science
Yale University

Hahrie Han
Professor of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University

Jonathan Hartlyn
Professor of Political Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thomas J. Hayes
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Connecticut

Gretchen Helmke
Professor of Political Science
University of Rochester

Jeffrey R. Henig
Professor of Political Science & Education
Columbia University

Jeffrey Herf
Professor of History
University of Maryland, College Park

Kenneth S. Hicks
Professor of Political Science
Rogers State University

Lisa Hilbink
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Minnesota

Jennifer Hochschild
Professor of Government
Harvard University

Amanda Hollis-Brusky
Associate Professor of Politics
Pomona College

Lisa M. Holmes
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Vermont

Daniel Hopkins
Professor of Political Science
University of Pennsylvania

Matthew B. Incantalupo
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Yeshiva University

Matt Jacobsmeier
Associate Professor of Political Science
West Virginia University

Gary C. Jacobson
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
University of California, San Diego

Hakeem Jefferson
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Stanford University

Bruce W. Jentleson
Professor of Public Policy and Political Science
Duke University

Theodore R. Johnson
Senior Fellow & Director, Fellows Program
Brennan Center for Justice

David A. Jones
Professor of Political Science
James Madison University

Richard Joseph
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Northwestern University

Nathan P. Kalmoe
Associate Professor of Political Communication
Louisiana State University

Terry Lynn Karl
Professor Emeritus of Latin American Studies and Political Science
Stanford University

Nancy Kassop
Professor of Political Science and International Relations
State University of New York at New Paltz

Thomas M. Keck
Professor of Political Science
Syracuse University

Alex Keena
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Virginia Commonwealth University

R. Daniel Kelemen
Professor of Political Science and Law
Rutgers University

Nathan J. Kelly
Professor of Political Science
University of Tennessee

Alexander Keyssar
Professor of History and Social Policy
Harvard University

Helen M. Kinsella
Associate Professor of Political Science & Law
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Eric Kramon
Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs
George Washington University

Ron Krebs
Professor of Political Science
University of Minnesota

Katherine Krimmel
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Barnard College, Columbia University

Daniel Kryder
Associate Professor of Politics
Brandeis University

Didi Kuo
Senior Research Scholar, Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law
Stanford University

Matt Lacombe
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Barnard College, Columbia University

Timothy LaPira
Professor of Political Science
James Madison University

Michael Latner
Senior Fellow
Union of Concerned Scientists’ Center for Science and Democracy

Anna O. Law
Associate Professor of Political Science
CUNY Brooklyn College

Adrienne LeBas
Associate Professor of Government
American University

Yphtach Lelkes
Assistant Professor, Annenberg School for Communication
University of Pennsylvania

Margaret Levi
Professor of Political Science
Stanford University

Peter Levine
Professor, Tisch College
Tufts University

Steve Levitsky
Professor of Government
Harvard University

Robert Lieberman
Professor of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University

Paul C. Light
Professor of Public Service
New York University

Scott Mainwaring
Professor of Political Science
University of Notre Dame

Michael J. Malbin
Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Emeritus
University at Albany, SUNY

Thomas E. Mann
Senior Fellow, Governance Studies
Brookings Institution

Jane Mansbridge
Professor Emerita of Political Leadership and Democratic Values
Harvard University

Andrei S. Markovits
Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Michigan

Gregory Markus
Professor Emeritus, Political Science
University of Michigan

Renée Marlin-Bennett
Professor of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University

Seth Masket
Professor of Political Science
University of Denver

Lilliana H. Mason
Associate Research Professor, Department of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University

Corrine M. McConnaughy
Research Scholar and Lecturer, Department of Politics
Princeton University

Jennifer McCoy
Professor of Political Science
Georgia State University

Suzanne Mettler
Professor of American Institutions, Department of Government
Cornell University

Robert Mickey
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Michigan

Michael Minta
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Minnesota

Terry Moe
Professor of Political Science
Stanford University

Jana Morgan
Professor of Political Science
University of Tennessee

Mason Moseley
Associate Professor of Political Science
West Virginia University

Russell Muirhead
Professor of Democracy
Dartmouth College

Diana Mutz
Professor of Political Science and Communication
University of Pennsylvania

C. Daniel Myers
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Minnesota

Pippa Norris
Professor of Political Science
Harvard University

Anne Norton
Professor of Political Science
University of Pennsylvania

Julie Novkov
Professor of Political Science
University at Albany, SUNY

Brendan Nyhan
Professor of Government
Dartmouth College

Angela X. Ocampo
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Michigan

Norm Ornstein
Emeritus Scholar
American Enterprise Institute

Eric W. Orts
Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics
University of Pennsylvania

Terrence M. O’Sullivan
Associate Professor of Security Studies
University of New Hampshire

Benjamin I. Page
Professor of Decision Making
Northwestern University

Joseph M. Parent
Professor of Political Science
University of Notre Dame

Josh Pasek
Associate Professor of Communication & Media and Political Science
University of Michigan

Tom Pepinsky
Professor, Department of Government
Cornell University

Anibal Perez-Linan
Professor of Political Science and Global Affairs
University of Notre Dame

Dirk Philipsen
Associate Research Professor of Economic History
Duke University

Paul Pierson
Professor of Political Science
University of California, Berkeley

William Plater
Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus of Public Affairs, Philanthropy, and English
Indiana University

Brian M. Pollins
Associate Professor Emeritus of Political Science
The Ohio State University

Ethan Porter
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science
George Washington University

David Prindle
Professor of Government
University of Texas at Austin

Robert D. Putnam
Professor of Public Policy
Harvard University

Miles S. Rapoport
Senior Practice Fellow in American Democracy
Harvard University

Nils Ringe
Professor of Political Science
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Kenneth Roberts
Professor of Government
Cornell University

Amanda Lea Robinson
Associate Professor of Political Science
Ohio State University

Deondra Rose
Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Political Science, and History
Duke University

Nancy L. Rosenblum
Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government Emerita
Harvard University

Stella M. Rouse
Associate Professor, Department of Government and Politics
University of Maryland

Larry J. Sabato
University Professor of Politics
University of Virginia

Sara Sadhwani
Assistant Professor of Politics
Pomona College

Virginia Sapiro
Professor of Political Science
Boston University

Anoop Sarbahi
Assistant Professor of Political Science
University of Minnesota

David Schanzer
Professor of the Practice of Public Policy
Duke University

Kim L. Scheppele
Professor of Sociology and International Affairs
Princeton University

Daniel Schlozman
Associate Professor of Political Science
Johns Hopkins University

Kay L. Schlozman
Professor of Political Science
Boston College

Philippe C. Schmitter
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
European University Institute

Cathy Lisa Schneider
Professor, School of International Service
American University

Holli A. Semetko
Professor of Political Science
Emory University

Shauna Lani Shames
Associate Professor in Political Science
Rutgers University, Camden

Gisela Sin
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
University of Illinois

Dan Slater
Professor of Political Science
University of Michigan

Anne-Marie Slaughter
Professor Emerita of Politics and International Relations
Princeton University

Charles Anthony Smith
Professor of Political Science and Law
University of California, Irvine

Rogers M. Smith
Professor of Political Science
University of Pennsylvania

Paul M. Sniderman
Professor of Political Science
Stanford University

Alan D. Solomont
Dean, Tisch College
Tufts University

Thomas A. Spragens, Jr.
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Duke University

Leonard Steinhorn
Professor of Communication
American University

Susan Stokes
Professor of Political Science
University of Chicago

Robert Pepperman Taylor
Professor of Political Science
University of Vermont

Alexander George Theodoridis
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Chloe Thurston
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Northwestern University

Laurence H. Tribe
Professor Emeritus of Constitutional Law
Harvard Law School

Jeffrey K. Tulis
Professor of Government
The University of Texas at Austin

Steven Twing
Professor of Political Science
Frostburg State University

Antonio Ugues Jr.
Associate Professor of Political Science
St. Mary's College of Maryland

Stephen E. Van Holde
Professor of Political Science and International Studies
Kenyon College

Michael W. Wagner
Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Omar Wasow
Assistant Professor, Department of Politics
Princeton University

Christopher Witko
Professor of Public Policy and Political Science
Pennsylvania State University

Christina Wolbrecht
Professor of Political Science
University of Notre Dame

Deborah J. Yashar
Professor of Politics & International Affairs
Princeton University

Alex Zakaras
Associate Professor of Political Science
University of Vermont

Daniel Ziblatt
Professor of Government
Harvard University

*Institutions and titles are listed for identification purposes only.
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." —Voltaire
"They want to take away your hamburgers. This is what Stalin dreamt about but never achieved." —Sebastian Gorka
User avatar
Seabass
THREAD STARTER
 
Name: Gazpacho Police
Posts: 3891

Country: Covidiocracy
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1938  Postby Spearthrower » Jun 13, 2021 5:44 am

Elitist libs in their ivory towers; they're probably Commies anyway.

/how to reflexively dismiss ideologically inconvenient ideas
I'm not an atheist; I just don't believe in gods :- that which I don't belong to isn't a group!
Religion: Mass Stockholm Syndrome

Learn Stuff. Stuff good. https://www.coursera.org/
User avatar
Spearthrower
 
Posts: 31167
Age: 46
Male

Country: Thailand
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1939  Postby chango369 » Jun 13, 2021 12:13 pm

Here's former CA Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, participating in the insurrection. When are we ever going to see any high profile indictments?

rep10.png
rep10.png (143.28 KiB) Viewed 432 times
image_2021-06-13_080355.png
image_2021-06-13_080355.png (87.7 KiB) Viewed 432 times
“Government is the Entertainment division of the military-industrial complex.”

Frank Zappa
User avatar
chango369
 
Name: Chris
Posts: 1857
Age: 62
Male

Country: думфукистан
Cuba (cu)
Print view this post

Re: Republican Watch

#1940  Postby The_Piper » Jun 13, 2021 1:22 pm

When the DOJ grows a pair. They're bullshit. They decided to continue to represent Donald Trump in the E Jean Carrol lawsuit. Trump is still walking around lighting fires when the public has had evidence of crimes for years. Gaetz, same thing. Everybody knows he broke the law. They'd happily bust you or I for growing a pot plant. They'd probably put us in handcuffs for taking the wrong vegetables home from Canada.
"There are two ways to view the stars; as they really are, and as we might wish them to be." - Carl Sagan
"If an argument lasts more than five minutes, both parties are wrong" unknown
Self Taken Pictures of Wildlife
User avatar
The_Piper
 
Name: Fletch F. Fletch
Posts: 29623
Age: 47
Male

Country: Chainsaw Country
United States (us)
Print view this post

PreviousNext

Return to News, Politics & Current Affairs

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 4 guests