The real mass contained in Planck constant

Planck mass

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The real mass contained in Planck constant

#1  Postby demarmat » Aug 10, 2019 1:19 am

First of all, I found error in the definition of acceleration. There are two methods to determine if an object is accelerating. With the first method we measure the distance an object is covering in a certain period of time. Suppose an object covers 1 meter in the first second. But in the other second the object covers 2 meters. We certainly have acceleration here because the speed of an object was increased from 1m/s to 2m/s. With the second method we measure the time it takes for an object to cover a certain distance. Suppose an object covers the distance of one meter in one second, but the next meter is covered in half of the time. Here we also have acceleration, because the speed of an object was increased from 1m/s to 2m/s (1m/ 1/2s = 2m/s). However, we don't really know what is going on: we don't know what the acceleration is and what causes the acceleration. Speed contains only two elements: distance over time d/t. Therefore, we can describe both of these methods in the equations: nd/t = d/t/n where “n” stands for unknown value. We can clearly see that “n” must increase in both equations to get acceleration. In the first equation “n” must increase value because the greater the distance covered by an object in a certain time equals higher speed. In the second equation “n” must also increase because to get a higher speed, the object must cover a certain distance in a smaller time.
If in place of “n” we use time (t), in both equations we are getting the distance (d). Distance is the value we are looking for, because only distance was increased in both of our experiments. Now, if we use distance (d) in place of “n” in both equations we are getting d²/t, which is the proper description of the acceleration. Acceleration is a change in the distance of speed and this is the proper definition of acceleration. We are never going to get acceleration in form of d/t² , which is today's acceleration. Now, compare my acceleration a = d²/t to the Planck constant h = md²/t.
If we divide the Planck constant by my acceleration of c (speed of light), we get the mass contained in the Planck constant which is 7.372 x 10 - 51 kg. Should we now call it a particle or a quantum of mass? Yes, it's a particle, but not a quantum of mass.
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Re: The real mass contained in Planck constant

#2  Postby Papa Smurf » Aug 10, 2019 5:32 pm

demarmat wrote:First of all, I found error in the definition of acceleration.


Wow, you are certain to be awarded the next Nobel prize for physics.

demarmat wrote:d²/t, which is the proper description of the acceleration.


Substituting S.I. units you get

m²/s

which does not make sense.

demarmat wrote:Acceleration is a change in the distance of speed


What on earth is 'the distance of speed'?

demarmat wrote:d/t²


Speed is d/t or m/s in S.I. units. Acceleration is defined as change of speed per second or

Δ(d/t) /t or in S.I. units m/s /s = m/s²

which still makes sense to me
Last edited by Papa Smurf on Aug 10, 2019 5:39 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: The real mass contained in Planck constant

#3  Postby Spearthrower » Aug 10, 2019 5:34 pm

demarmat wrote:First of all, I found error in the definition of acceleration.


Having done so, you then decided to join a web forum to tell complete strangers all about it. :grin:
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Re: The real mass contained in Planck constant

#4  Postby newolder » Aug 10, 2019 6:22 pm

demarmat wrote:First of all, I found error in the definition of acceleration. ...


{Pantomime season has arrived early this year.}

Oh! No! You haven't!

A change of distance, dx, takes x -> x + dx. The rate of this change is defined as the velocity, v, in the x direction.
vx = dx/dt

Acceleration, a, is defined as the rate of change of velocity: ax = dvx/dt = d(dx/dt)/dt = d2x/dt2.

Note that dx may be positive (increasing x direction) or negative and the sign of dx determines the signs of velocity and acceleration.

The Planck mass, Mp, is expressed as, Mp = (hc/G)1/2 where letters denote common physical constants (Planck's constant, the speed of light in vacuo and Newton's constant of Gravitational action) and calculates to approximately 0.02 milligrammes.

...and they all lived happily until they slipped on the banana skin of quantum gravity theory.

{INTERLUDE}
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