Posted: Mar 05, 2014 3:27 pm
by Calilasseia
Deremensis wrote:
The_Piper wrote:
Deremensis wrote:and to The_Piper: I will try to post some of my nature photography at some point later! I'm taking a field bio class right now, so I'll have a lot of photos of native Florida plants and birds. :)

Woohoo! :smile: Anything will be interesting. I saw you mentioned ticks. We've even had a couple of people sharing micrographs of bacteria.


Ah, that was my bad. Common beggars ticks are a weed, not an actual tick :lol:
They're little white flowers with a yellow center that get their name from the fact that just about anything that lightly brushes up against them will get their seed stuck on them and spread it elsewhere. Here in Florida you'll find the damn things crowding out everything but the crabgrass in a yard. This is similar to what they look like (I'm not sure I've seen leaves like this on most of the ones I see down here, but the flower looks the same, and it is definitely of the Bidens genus):

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The leaves on that plant don't look like any of the Bidens species in my field guide. Bidens species have narrow, lanceolate, coarsely toothed leaves, whilst your image depicts something with pinnately lobed foliage. Those five petalled flowers don't resemble a composite either, they're far closer in appearance to one of the Geum species in the Rosaceae, such as Herb Bennet, Geum urbanum, which, along with the related Water Avens, Geum rivale, has burr like fruits that cling to clothing. Beggar Ticks produces rectangular, two-pronged fruits that resemble a tick infestation in appearance, hence the name.

From this website, I was able to find some photos of Beggar Ticks, which is a waterside plant growing on stream and riverbanks, but above the high tide line, and never in a situation where the roots can become inundated. It likes damp but not waterlogged soil. The first picture shows the general growth habit - note those leaves, narrow lanceolate and coarsely toothed:

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In this photo, it can be seen that some leaves may have a pair of lobes at the base:

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Close up of the inflorescence, showing lots of disc florets, but few, if any, ray florets:

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For comparison, here's Herb Bennet, Geum urbanum, a plant I encounter frequently in my neighbourhood:

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That shot shows flowers, leaves and fruits quite nicely. The name comes from the fact that Herb Bennet is one of the ingredients used to flavour Benedictine Liqueuer. :)

A quick check of Wikipedia reveals that North America has something like 20 species of Geum to choose from, including at least four that resemble your plant.