Posted: Mar 14, 2020 4:17 am
by Nevets
Hermit wrote:

One recent glaring example is your claim that the Norse had to be tough travellers because they come from the "The Hamburg culture", created around 15,500BC. Indeed, the Wikipedia provides references to the existence of the Norse, and it provides links to the Hamburg culture. What it does not provide, neither directly nor indirectly, is a link between the two, or how a connection between two types of societies that are 15,000 years apart could even be meaningful. This is the sort of stuff that springs out of your imagination, not the Wikipedia. And you keep doing this sort of thing again and again.


Sorry, but this is because you do not read the articles i link too.
Lets take a look shall we.

ARTICLE NORWAY PREHISTORY
The first inhabitants were the Ahrensburg culture (11th to 10th millennia BC), which was a late Upper Paleolithic culture during the Younger Dryas, the last period of cold at the end of the Weichselian glaciation. The culture is named after the village of Ahrensburg, 25 km (15.53 mi) north-east of Hamburg in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein, where wooden arrow shafts and clubs have been excavated.[49] The earliest traces of human occupation in Norway are found along the coast, where the huge ice shelf of the last ice age first melted between 11,000 and 8,000 BC. The oldest finds are stone tools dating from 9,500 to 6,000 BC, discovered in Finnmark (Komsa culture) in the north and Rogaland (Fosna culture) in the south-west. However, theories about two altogether different cultures (the Komsa culture north of the Arctic Circle being one and the Fosna culture from Trøndelag to Oslofjord being the other) were rendered obsolete in the 1970s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norway#Prehistory



Right, so, do you see the bit that says that the first inhabitants of Norway were the Ahrensburg culture? Do you see? Yes? No?
If yes, then what do we do now? Well, we "click" on Ahrensburg culture and read up on it

THE AHRENSBURG CULTURE
The Ahrensburg culture or Ahrensburgian (c. 12,900 to 11,700 BP[1]) was a late Upper Paleolithic nomadic hunter culture (or technocomplex) in north-central Europe during the Younger Dryas, the last spell of cold at the end of the Weichsel glaciation resulting in deforestation and the formation of a tundra with bushy arctic white birch and rowan. The most important prey was the wild reindeer. The earliest definite finds of arrow and bow date to this culture, though these weapons might have been invented earlier. The Ahrensburgian was preceded by the Hamburg and Federmesser cultures and superseded by the Maglemosian and Swiderian cultures. Ahrensburgian finds were made in southern and western Scandinavia, the North German plain and western Poland. The Ahrensburgian area also included vast stretches of land now at the bottom of the North and Baltic Sea, since during the Younger Dryas the coastline took a much more northern course than today.

The culture is named after a tunnel valley near the village of Ahrensburg, 25 km (16 mi) northeast of Hamburg in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein, where Ahrensburg find layers were excavated in Meiendorf, Stellmoor and Borneck. While these as well as the majority of other find sites date to the Young Dryas, the Ahrensburgian find layer in Alt Duvenstedt has been dated to the very late Allerød, thus possibly representing an early stage of Ahrensburgian which might have corresponded to the Bromme culture in the north. Artefacts with tanged points are found associated with both the Bromme and the Ahrensburg cultures. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahrensburg_culture


Now all those cultures, including "The Hamburg Culture" are all written about on that article about the Ahrensburg culture, and they are all regarded as being of the same culture, during different time periods, and spreading quite far and wide.

The reason you think i am just connecting things that are not connected, is because, "for your benefit", i remove all the walls of text that are irrelevant, to make it easier for "you" to read, and i seperate the quotes, which appears to be giving you the impression i am dot connecting. I am not. It is all written quite clearly in "one" single article, with barely any full stops, and it all comes under Ahrensburg culture.

However, it is too much, that in order to debate what is already written in "one" wikipedia article, i have to alse teach you what to click on, and how to read it properly. You have to meet me half way at least, and actually read the articles i post, not just the small quotes i present to you.

Oh, and btw. I did not say they have to be tough because they come from the Hamburg culture.
I said they had to be tough, because they had to migrate south, during the ice-age, or they would die.

Do you even know what the Younger dryas was?
Sorry to be harsh.

But what has been proven here. Is that "you" had never even heard of the Hamburg Culture, nor the Ahrensburg culture, before i brought it up.