Posted: Jun 02, 2016 9:45 pm
by Calilasseia
Apparently, Trey Pearson, a singer with an evangelical Christian rock band, has just come out as being gay. He made the statement in a letter published in 614 magazine. The full article can be read here.

A particularly poignant part of this unfolding story is this part of his letter:

I grew up in a very conservative Christian home where I was taught that my sexual orientation was a matter of choice, and had put all my faith into that. I had never before admitted to myself that I was gay, let alone to anyone else. I never wanted to be gay. I was scared of what God would think and what all of these people I loved would think about me; so it never was an option for me. I have been suppressing these attractions and feelings since adolescence. I’ve tried my whole life to be straight. I married a girl, and I even have two beautiful little kids. My daughter, Liv, is six and my son, Beckham, is two.


The letter goes on:

I had always romanticized the idea of falling in love with a woman; and having a family had always been my dream. In many ways, that dream has come true. But I have also come to realize a lot of time has passed in my life pushing away, blocking out and not dealing with real feelings going on inside of me. I have tried not to be gay for more than 20 years of my life. I found so much comfort as a teen in 1 Samuel 18-20 and the intimacy of Jonathan and David. I thought and hoped that such male intimacy could fulfill that void I felt in my desire for male companionship. I always thought if I could find these intimate friendships, then that would be enough.Then I thought everything would come naturally on my wedding night. I honestly had never even made out with a girl before I got married. Of course, it felt anything but natural for me. Trying not to be gay, has only led to a desire for intimacy in friendships, which pushed friends away, and it has resulted in a marriage where I couldn’t love or satisfy my wife in a way that she needed. When Lauren and I got married, I committed to loving her to the best of my ability, and I had the full intention of spending the rest of my life with her. Despite our best efforts, however, I have come to accept that there is nothing that is going to change who I am.


A telling part of his writing is this:

So many of us live in fear. Most of the time it is fear of what we don’t know or understand. As much as I love Jesus, it is hard to see white, male pastors instill this fear of ignorance—who won’t even have the humility to have the conversation, to try and understand, when they don’t realize how damaging what they are doing is for so many people. It’s so easy when you have never had to be the minority, or the oppressed, or haven’t had to know what it’s like to not be able to be who you are. Maybe it is your church, your family, or your culture where you live that keeps you living in fear. But it’s not honest. That’s what creates the bubble so many people hate about church: the lack of honesty when it comes to questions about faith. The vast majority of people are tired of that. Faith can be a beautiful thing. But it has to start with honesty.


The entirely predictable response arrived quickly. Alluded to just briefly in the coverage of the story by The Guardian, thus:

Commenting on the letter to the magazine, Pearson calls his announcement “freeing”, but adds that he has lost some of the closest people in his life. He says some “church people” act like the worst people he has ever experienced. He says he’s starting over in many ways, “but it’s also starting out lonely”.


Pearson's full letter is also printed here in The Independent.

Though we've yet to hear the likes of Pat Robertson or Rush Limbaugh weigh in on this, it's only a matter of time. But the various news pages covering this development, are already starting to fill up with predictable comments from the bigots, laced with words like "perversion" and "unnatural". Though I don't have a Twitter presence (and frankly regard Twitter as a pestilence to be avoided at all costs), I suspect the Twitterverse is about to have one of its regular flame wars over this.