Posted: Jan 02, 2016 8:13 pm
by John Platko
Working down the list of basic functions I need to complete before starting the actual lick heuristic ...

1) FIngerboard positions.

Up to this point licks have been using notes at the lower part of the fingerboard near the nut- and they've been in the key of E. But there are other keys and other fingerboard positions. I'm not planning to do much with different keys because, for the most part, it's a fairly simple matter of transposing licks in a given key to another key by changing where on the fingerboard you play the lick. (There are some issues like, use of open frets, that get in the way sometimes but that's a nit that's not too important to what I'm doing.) I'll just give an example of how a lick in the key of E can be transposed to the key of A by moving all notes in the lick up 5 positions on the fretboard. LickMaker now has a function that can do this. Here's lick 0 transposed to the key of A.

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Similar to the previous example. Moving all notes in the lick 12 frets up the fingerboard transposes the lick an octave up. So we get the same key but now the pitches in the lick are an octave higher and, because of the nature of guitars, each note will have a bit different harmonic content too.

Here's lick 0 an octave up:

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Often guitar players can play the same lick in different positions on the fretboard. That is, they can as long as all the notes in the lick are available at or near that position. For notes that are not available they need to either play them in some other position or play those notes in an octave available at the new position. For example: here's lick 0 moved up to the third fret (which many systems consider the next position up for this key).

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And here's the same lick moved up to the 5th fret.

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Moving the lick to different locations on the fingerboard as in the above examples will be eventually useful to help LickMaker populate the fingerboard, or physical dimensions, of the "lick universe" that it will try to fill. But I think I'll simplify things a bit at first and save that for last.

However, transposing lick position is also useful in changing the chord/scale of the lick. And by making a couple of position transformations (of different types) , a lick that has more of a minor chord and minor pentatonic feel can be made to have more of a major chord and major pentatonic feel - as I've done in the following example: (I think I'll just leave the whammy bar bend)

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Doing a similar major minor position transformation is common for major minor scale and chord transposing but the double position transformation shown in the last example is new to me and I need to think about it more and explore what I can do with it.