A plastic brain phenomena -

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A plastic brain phenomena -

#1  Postby Macdoc » Jan 20, 2016 8:47 am

Your face is mapped on the surface of other people’s brains

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A map for other people’s faces has been discovered in the brain. It could help explain why some of us are better at recognising faces than others.

Every part of your body that you can move or feel is represented in the outer layer of your brain. These “maps”, found in the motor and sensory cortices (see diagram, below), tend to preserve the basic spatial layout of the body – neurons that represent our fingers are closer to neurons that represent our arms than our feet, for example.

The same goes for other people’s faces, says Linda Henriksson at Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland. Her team scanned 12 people’s brains while they looked at hundreds of images of noses, eyes, mouths and other facial features and recorded which bits of the brain became active.

This revealed a region in the occipital face area in which features that are next to each other on a real face are organised together in the brain’s representation of that face. The team have called this map the “faciotopy”.

The occipital face area is a region of the brain known to be involved in general facial processing. “Facial recognition is so fundamental to human behaviour that it makes sense that there would be a specialised area of the brain that maps features of the face,” she says.

This is the first example of a brain map that reflects the topology of an object in our environment, says Henriksson.


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https://www.newscientist.com/article/20 ... es-brains/
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EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
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