ASD and video games

CAn anyone help me with this study?

Studies of mental functions, behaviors and the nervous system.

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ASD and video games

#1  Postby felltoearth » Jan 03, 2015 6:50 am

Can I have some help interpreting the study at the link.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ... l.pdf+html

To me it seems the sample size is rather small, the methodology of parent questionnaire and (what seems to me) the high level of statistical controls does not allow for the degree of confidence in the conclusion.

I'm also interested in any good information anyone would have on video gaming and neurological development especially anything on children and Asperger's/ASD.

(I am also interested in this article if anyone happens to have access http://aut.sagepub.com/content/early/20 ... l.pdf+html )
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Re: ASD and video games

#2  Postby Pebble » Jan 03, 2015 10:24 am

Stats look good, Bonferroni is a particularly conservative correction for multiple analyses, however the issues are predominantly that of population selection. The ASD group with only 10% IQ < 70 is probably not typical of ASD. The Typical population is completely different socioeconomically and parental oversight wise. One might expect in poorer, more stressed single parent families that gaming devices would be used as a method of getting kids out from under your feet, thus resultant associations cannot be inferred from across non-comparable groups. There was some attempt to control for this, but not really good enough given that the magnitude of effect is unknown.
The association between 'role-playing' and 'addictive behavior - seems intuitively likely, but do those that become 'dependent' move toward such games or vice versa.
Seems reasonable to conclude that further studies are required, ideally with better cohort matching. Whether parental reporting is unbiased, is difficult, there are claims that this is robust - but would have to go back to original research on that, since likely that parents of demanding children would report differently.
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Re: ASD and video games

#3  Postby felltoearth » Jan 03, 2015 7:58 pm

Thanks for taking the time Pebble.

Pebble wrote:Stats look good, Bonferroni is a particularly conservative correction for multiple analyses, however the issues are predominantly that of population selection. The ASD group with only 10% IQ < 70 is probably not typical of ASD.



Wouldn't this be true of Kanner's Autism? I don't know the prevalence as a percentage but 10% would make some sense especially in a poorer context where early intervention may not be possible. And given the broad spectrum I would like to see the three subcategories broken out. As this would leave approximately 10 subjects as a sample group for Asperger's (the reason I am interested in this study) I find the results fairly useless.

Pebble wrote:The Typical population is completely different socioeconomically and parental oversight wise. One might expect in poorer, more stressed single parent families that gaming devices would be used as a method of getting kids out from under your feet, thus resultant associations cannot be inferred from across non-comparable groups. There was some attempt to control for this, but not really good enough given that the magnitude of effect is unknown.


Thanks. This was the control factor I was wondering about the most.

Pebble wrote:The association between 'role-playing' and 'addictive behavior - seems intuitively likely, but do those that become 'dependent' move toward such games or vice versa.


Perhaps it's not a relevant question as video games might exacerbate the problem-- or not.

Pebble wrote:Seems reasonable to conclude that further studies are required, ideally with better cohort matching.



By this I am assuming you mean a breakdown in the ASD group etc, with a larger sample size?

Pebble wrote:Whether parental reporting is unbiased, is difficult, there are claims that this is robust - but would have to go back to original research on that, since likely that parents of demanding children would report differently.


I wonder about that. I believe that my ex and myself would likely report different on my son, especially when it comes to qualitative judgement of behaviour. But, like you say, it's difficult to tell without seeing the original questionnaire.

Thanks again for the feedback. Very enlightening. :thumbup:
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