Autism, the labeling of disease, and 'neurodiversity'

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Re: Autism, the labeling of disease, and 'neurodiversity'

#21  Postby felltoearth » Oct 13, 2015 2:36 pm

John Platko wrote:
GT2211 wrote:
Most people think of autism as a disease, a major impediment of which an increasing number of children are "victims." But over the past two decades, a growing number of adults on the autism spectrum, myself included, have rejected this frame and called for non-autistic "neurotypicals" to respect and accommodate "neurodiversity." We believe that autism is a natural and in many ways desirable variation in how people think, not a great evil to be stamped out.

To neurotypical people, this may seem like a shocking reversal. But as science journalist Steve Silberman writes in his new book NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, the man who discovered autism, Austrian psychiatrist Hans Asperger, conceived of it similarly, as a way of thinking that brings blessings as well as hardships. It was only after psychiatrist Leo Kanner claimed credit for Asperger's discovery in 1943 and introduced a much harsher view of autism did people begin to view it as a disease.

http://www.vox.com/2015/8/31/9233295/au ... r-asperger



The world of psychology generally sets it compass on the neurotypical, even branches that spawned from people like Carl Jung, who focused on individuation as opposed to herd mentality, are caught in that trap. Their little boxes that they like to pigeon hole people into says more about the psychological community than the people they are pathologizing.


This post makes a lot of assumptions about why one would seek diagnosis, treatment and therapy.
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Re: Autism, the labeling of disease, and 'neurodiversity'

#22  Postby John Platko » Oct 13, 2015 2:50 pm

felltoearth wrote:
John Platko wrote:
GT2211 wrote:
Most people think of autism as a disease, a major impediment of which an increasing number of children are "victims." But over the past two decades, a growing number of adults on the autism spectrum, myself included, have rejected this frame and called for non-autistic "neurotypicals" to respect and accommodate "neurodiversity." We believe that autism is a natural and in many ways desirable variation in how people think, not a great evil to be stamped out.

To neurotypical people, this may seem like a shocking reversal. But as science journalist Steve Silberman writes in his new book NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, the man who discovered autism, Austrian psychiatrist Hans Asperger, conceived of it similarly, as a way of thinking that brings blessings as well as hardships. It was only after psychiatrist Leo Kanner claimed credit for Asperger's discovery in 1943 and introduced a much harsher view of autism did people begin to view it as a disease.

http://www.vox.com/2015/8/31/9233295/au ... r-asperger



The world of psychology generally sets it compass on the neurotypical, even branches that spawned from people like Carl Jung, who focused on individuation as opposed to herd mentality, are caught in that trap. Their little boxes that they like to pigeon hole people into says more about the psychological community than the people they are pathologizing.


This post makes a lot of assumptions about why one would seek diagnosis, treatment and therapy.


While this post makes some bold generalizations of the "world of psychology" which is a witches brew of science and woo, it says nothing about why one would seek "diagnosis", "treatment", and/or "therapy".
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Re: Autism, the labeling of disease, and 'neurodiversity'

#23  Postby Agrippina » Oct 14, 2015 5:47 am

As someone who actually did that, I was motivated to seek a diagnosis, not treatment, or therapy, because it explained why I always thought there was "something wrong with me". Now I know it's not what's "wrong" with me, but why I don't fit in, why things that shouldn't, do bother me. Getting the diagnosis made me more able to overcome depression, to become more confident, to accept that the NT world wasn't where I was supposed to fit in, and that where I didn't fit in, it wasn't because I'm "weird" or "wrong" but because just like some people don't like broccoli, I don't like socialising etc etc.
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