Computing like the Brain: the Path to Machine Intelligence

youtube talk at GOTO; Conference

Studies of mental functions, behaviors and the nervous system.

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Computing like the Brain: the Path to Machine Intelligence

#1  Postby kennyc » Nov 19, 2014 1:38 pm

The sound is pretty sucky, but good presentation.

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Re: Computing like the Brain: the Path to Machine Intelligence

#2  Postby epepke » Nov 19, 2014 5:52 pm

Excellent talk.
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Re: Computing like the Brain: the Path to Machine Intelligence

#3  Postby zoon » Nov 19, 2014 10:24 pm

Certainly an interesting talk. Early in the video, Jeff Hawkins says Turing claimed that the Turing test was the definition of an intelligent machine, and that that is a terrible definition. I think this is unfair to Turing; other people may well have made that claim, but Turing was careful not to. He proposed his test as a potentially useful one because definitions were so difficult, since terms like "machine" and "intelligent" and "think" are highly ambiguous. Turing was well aware that machines might be doing something very different from humans which could still qualify as intelligence, the problem is: how do you demonstrate that the machine is doing something which is at least equivalent to what humans can do? The Turing test is still as clear an answer as anyone has thought of to that question.

Quoting two of the early paragraphs in Turing's 1950 paper:
Alan Turing wrote:I PROPOSE to consider the question, 'Can machines think?' This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms 'machine 'and 'think'. The definitions might be framed so as to reflect so far as possible the normal use of the words, but this attitude is dangerous. If the meaning of the words 'machine' and 'think 'are to be found by examining how they are commonly used it is difficult to escape the conclusion that the meaning and the answer to the question, 'Can machines think?' is to be sought in a statistical survey such as a Gallup poll. But this is absurd. Instead of attempting such a definition I shall replace the question by another, which is closely related to it and is expressed in relatively unambiguous words.
.........

The game may perhaps be criticised on the ground that the odds are weighted too heavily against the machine. If the man were to try and pretend to be the machine he would clearly make a very poor showing. He would be given away at once by slowness and inaccuracy in arithmetic. May not machines carry out some-thing which ought to be described as thinking but which is very different from what a man does? This objection is a very strong one, but at least we can say that if, nevertheless, a machine can be constructed to play the imitation game satisfactorily, we need not be troubled by this objection.
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Re: Computing like the Brain: the Path to Machine Intelligence

#4  Postby kennyc » Nov 19, 2014 10:42 pm

Agreed.
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