Psychosis as a defence against emotional sensitivity/pain

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Psychosis as a defence against emotional sensitivity/pain

#1  Postby Keep It Real » Jun 01, 2018 12:13 am

Much as some people far along the autistic spectrum sometimes flee deep into their condition as a defence/displacement from emotional realism/sensitivity/pain/trauma perhaps the same is true of those prone to psychosis? Although autism is generally thought to be an immutable/constant/permanent condition unlike psychosis AFAIK...interesting?
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Re: Psychosis as a defence against emotional sensitivity/pain

#2  Postby Sendraks » Jun 01, 2018 7:37 am

"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

"'Science doesn't know everything' - Well science knows it doesn't know everything, otherwise it'd stop" - Dara O'Brian
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Re: Psychosis as a defence against emotional sensitivity/pain

#3  Postby felltoearth » Jun 01, 2018 11:56 am

Keep It Real wrote:Much as some people far along the autistic spectrum sometimes flee deep into their condition as a defence/displacement from emotional realism/sensitivity/pain/trauma perhaps the same is true of those prone to psychosis? Although autism is generally thought to be an immutable/constant/permanent condition unlike psychosis AFAIK...interesting?

Two different things. In the case of Autism, shutting down is disconnecting from reality where psychosis is a distortion of it.

This is a very good description of shutting down here:
https://everydayaspie.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/574/

Not at all like psychosis.
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