Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

common or crazy?

Studies of mental functions, behaviors and the nervous system.

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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#21  Postby Fallible » Jan 14, 2016 4:14 pm

That last example's a general UK thing. Give us a kiss, give us a look, give us a go.
John Grant wrote:They say 'let go, let go, let go, you must learn to let go'.
If I hear that fucking phrase again, this baby's gonna blow
Into a million itsy bitsy tiny pieces, don't you know,
Just like my favourite scene in Scanners .
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#22  Postby Animavore » Jan 14, 2016 4:42 pm

It's more like, "Giz a go". :lol:
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#23  Postby Onyx8 » Jan 14, 2016 4:47 pm

I talk to myself at work a lot (I work alone thankfully, most of the time) but always in the singular. i.e.: "Why the fuck did you do that you idiot?"
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#24  Postby Scot Dutchy » Jan 14, 2016 4:48 pm

Animavore wrote:In Ireland a lot of people refer to oneself as 'us'. Like, "Give us (me) a look at that."


Nothing to do with Gaelic?
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#25  Postby Murmur » Jan 14, 2016 5:01 pm

There was an interviewee on Binnall of America who referred to himself as "we". He did so because he was including his future selves, past selves, and selves that may be from other dimensions. This is only one of the reasons that I thought he was completely crazy. I'll see if I can find the guy, but it might take me a while.
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#26  Postby SafeAsMilk » Jan 14, 2016 5:03 pm

Thommo wrote:
CdesignProponentsist wrote:How do you refer to yourself when self talking?


"Oy, you"? :ask:

More seriously, if I vocalise an instruction to myself I usually use a name (either my name e.g. "Get a grip Paul", or "you twat" or something). Normally this is if I'm intensely annoyed and giving myself a telling off (generally only happens playing video games, oddly enough). Internally, I only ever think of myself as the pronoun "I".

I really don't talk to myself a lot. I'm more into talking to my cat.

Yeah, but when you talk to your cat, are you really talking to yourself? :think:
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#27  Postby ScholasticSpastic » Jan 14, 2016 5:08 pm

SafeAsMilk wrote:
Yeah, but when you talk to your cat, are you really talking to yourself? :think:

No more so than when you talk to a teenager.
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#28  Postby SafeAsMilk » Jan 14, 2016 5:15 pm

No no, I said talking to yourself, not talking to a wall!
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#29  Postby Fallible » Jan 14, 2016 5:26 pm

Amen to that.
John Grant wrote:They say 'let go, let go, let go, you must learn to let go'.
If I hear that fucking phrase again, this baby's gonna blow
Into a million itsy bitsy tiny pieces, don't you know,
Just like my favourite scene in Scanners .
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#30  Postby laklak » Jan 14, 2016 5:29 pm

My dad called it "talking to the ashtray". He'd be lecturing me over some adolescent idiocy and would pick up the ashtray and start talking to it.
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#31  Postby SafeAsMilk » Jan 14, 2016 6:08 pm

laklak wrote:My dad called it "talking to the ashtray". He'd be lecturing me over some adolescent idiocy and would pick up the ashtray and start talking to it.

This sounds amazing. More details plz
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#32  Postby Thommo » Jan 14, 2016 9:02 pm

SafeAsMilk wrote:Yeah, but when you talk to your cat, are you really talking to yourself? :think:


It's almost certainly more for me than her. Her English is pretty weak now I come to think of it.

She does talk back though.
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#33  Postby SafeAsMilk » Jan 14, 2016 11:21 pm

Thommo wrote:
SafeAsMilk wrote:Yeah, but when you talk to your cat, are you really talking to yourself? :think:


It's almost certainly more for me than her. Her English is pretty weak now I come to think of it.

She does talk back though.

The nice thing about cats is even if they don't speak clearly, they're either saying "Do my bidding" or "leave me alone."
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#34  Postby don't get me started » Jan 14, 2016 11:58 pm

The whole area of self-talk and internalized language is very interesting and has wide ranging implications for the study of language and psychology.
Here is what Langaker, the founder of the field of cognitive grammar has to say on the issue:

"It is generally accepted that the conversational use of language is primary. It is not the most frequent: The award for sheer prevalence goes to the silent verbal thought we engage in at almost every moment of our waking lives[…]
In no small measure, or verbal thought takes the form of an imagined dialogue, if only with ourselves." (2008, p. 459)

The great Russian philosopher Bakhtin concieved of thought as basically dialogic in nature, not monologic.
This from the Wiki on Bakhtin:

The term 'dialogic' does not only apply to literature. For Bakhtin, all language — indeed, all thought — appears as dialogical. This means that everything anybody ever says always exists in response to things that have been said before and in anticipation of things that will be said in response. In other words, we do not speak in a vacuum. All language (and the ideas which language contains and communicates) is dynamic, relational and engaged in a process of endless redescriptions of the world.

And another Russian the philosopher/ psychologist, Lev Vygotsky also conceived of thought and language as dialogic, that is, the mind is in dialogue with itself and with the external world. From the amazon blurb for his book 'Mind in society':

The mind, Vygotsky argues, cannot be understood in isolation from the surrounding society. Man is the only animal who uses tools to alter his own inner world as well as the world around him. From the handkerchief knotted as a simple mnemonic device to the complexities of symbolic language, society provides the individual with technology that can be used to shape the private processes of mind. In Mind in Society Vygotsky applies this theoretical framework to the development of perception, attention, memory, language, and play, and he examines its implications for education. The result is a remarkably interesting book that is bound to renew Vygotsky’s relevance to modem psychological thought.

One of the big problems (in my view) with a lot of traditional linguistics is conceiving of language as monologic. (E.g. Chomsky and the generative tradition works to analyze idealized and de-contextualized sentences, not concerning themselves with actual instances of real language.)

So, if you grant that the internal use of language, that is the private 'inner speech' that you engage in constantly is a kind of dialogue, even with the self, then it presupposes a sender of the message ( analogue to the speaker in external instances of uttered language) and a receiver of the message (analogue to the listener in external uttered language) , even though the sender and the receiver are both the self, there is a duality here that I think accounts for a logical use of 'we' to refer to the self.
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#35  Postby CdesignProponentsist » Jan 15, 2016 2:35 am

SafeAsMilk wrote:Yeah, but when you talk to your cat, are you really talking to yourself? :think:


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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#36  Postby The_Piper » Jan 15, 2016 2:36 am

So we're not crazy!
Well, not for that anyway. :mrgreen:
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#37  Postby Weaver » Jan 15, 2016 7:01 am

There is a general leadership practice that, when recruiting subordinates to accomplish a task, it is sometimes polite and politic to say "Let's do this" or "Can we get this done" rather than "Do this" or "hey, you guys, do this."

Could you be subconsciously employing this practice with your own inner-voice, to make it easier than saying internally "Hey, you fucking wanker, it's time to wash that plate" (or other non-FUA-violating example)?
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#38  Postby Fallible » Jan 15, 2016 8:24 am

don't get me started wrote:The whole area of self-talk and internalized language is very interesting and has wide ranging implications for the study of language and psychology.
Here is what Langaker, the founder of the field of cognitive grammar has to say on the issue:

"It is generally accepted that the conversational use of language is primary. It is not the most frequent: The award for sheer prevalence goes to the silent verbal thought we engage in at almost every moment of our waking lives[…]
In no small measure, or verbal thought takes the form of an imagined dialogue, if only with ourselves." (2008, p. 459)

The great Russian philosopher Bakhtin concieved of thought as basically dialogic in nature, not monologic.
This from the Wiki on Bakhtin:

The term 'dialogic' does not only apply to literature. For Bakhtin, all language — indeed, all thought — appears as dialogical. This means that everything anybody ever says always exists in response to things that have been said before and in anticipation of things that will be said in response. In other words, we do not speak in a vacuum. All language (and the ideas which language contains and communicates) is dynamic, relational and engaged in a process of endless redescriptions of the world.

And another Russian the philosopher/ psychologist, Lev Vygotsky also conceived of thought and language as dialogic, that is, the mind is in dialogue with itself and with the external world. From the amazon blurb for his book 'Mind in society':

The mind, Vygotsky argues, cannot be understood in isolation from the surrounding society. Man is the only animal who uses tools to alter his own inner world as well as the world around him. From the handkerchief knotted as a simple mnemonic device to the complexities of symbolic language, society provides the individual with technology that can be used to shape the private processes of mind. In Mind in Society Vygotsky applies this theoretical framework to the development of perception, attention, memory, language, and play, and he examines its implications for education. The result is a remarkably interesting book that is bound to renew Vygotsky’s relevance to modem psychological thought.

One of the big problems (in my view) with a lot of traditional linguistics is conceiving of language as monologic. (E.g. Chomsky and the generative tradition works to analyze idealized and de-contextualized sentences, not concerning themselves with actual instances of real language.)

So, if you grant that the internal use of language, that is the private 'inner speech' that you engage in constantly is a kind of dialogue, even with the self, then it presupposes a sender of the message ( analogue to the speaker in external instances of uttered language) and a receiver of the message (analogue to the listener in external uttered language) , even though the sender and the receiver are both the self, there is a duality here that I think accounts for a logical use of 'we' to refer to the self.


Fascinating! Thanks, DGMS! :cheers:
John Grant wrote:They say 'let go, let go, let go, you must learn to let go'.
If I hear that fucking phrase again, this baby's gonna blow
Into a million itsy bitsy tiny pieces, don't you know,
Just like my favourite scene in Scanners .
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#39  Postby Murmur » Jan 15, 2016 5:19 pm

I found the guy I talked about before. Larry E Arnold.

The interview at Binnall of America.
http://www.binnallofamerica.com/boaa080311.html
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Re: Referring to oneself as "we" when self talking

#40  Postby BioShock08 » Jan 24, 2017 5:26 am

igorfrankensteen wrote:Yes, I have some serious suggestions for you.

* you do it as the result of a sort of reverse-context training. That is, you grew up in a family, in which you were NOT the official "leader." You learned the "correct form" for talking about going to the store in that family context, and so by rote, you now use "we" whenever going to the grocery store (or similar tasks) comes up.

* for some reason, you don't feel personally empowered to decide certain things. Whenever you are about to say or do something that you feel needs justification beyond "cuz I wanna," you use the Royal We, in order to shift or share responsibility with imaginary others.

* you are so used to channeling movies and using their dialog to express yourself, that you even do mini-quotes, which happens to include saying "we" in a semi-humorous, semi-serious way, as if you have an audience who really liked series like "Cheers" or "Friends."


The second answer you gave describes my self-talk about 5-10% of the time. I would really like to know more about your explanation. Where can I read about that? Thank You.
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