These people recall every moment of every day

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Re: These people recall every moment of every day

#21  Postby Macdoc » Apr 20, 2019 3:08 am

whatever
you said it :roll:

Tuco
I am an idiot.


He however is not

Is the human brain analog or digital? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights.

Answer by Paul King, Director of Data Science, Computational Neuroscientist, Entrepreneur, on Quora:

The brain is neither analog nor digital, but works using a signal processing paradigm that has some properties in common with both.

Unlike a digital computer, the brain does not use binary logic or binary addressable memory, and it does not perform binary arithmetic. Information in the brain is represented in terms of statistical approximations and estimations rather than exact values. The brain is also non-deterministic and cannot replay instruction sequences with error-free precision. So in all these ways, the brain is definitely not "digital."

At the same time, the signals sent around the brain are "either-or" states that are similar to binary. A neuron fires or it does not. These all-or-nothing pulses are the basic language of the brain. So in this sense, the brain is computing using something like binary signals. Instead of 1s and 0s, or "on" and "off", the brain uses "spike" or "no spike" (referring to the firing of a neuron).

more
https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2016 ... 2431f57106

the feature of analogue is it is continuous....you really think the brain cannot record a few million seconds?? ....the failure of understanding is yours :coffee:
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Re: These people recall every moment of every day

#22  Postby tuco » Apr 20, 2019 3:10 am

What do you mean whatever? You did not support your claims, thus your claims are whatever.

I don't care whether the brain is digital or analog. That is beside the point. Concede your defeat like a wo/man.
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Re: These people recall every moment of every day

#23  Postby Macdoc » Apr 20, 2019 3:11 am

You don't think they are supported because you don't understand enough. Back to the books boyo.
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Re: These people recall every moment of every day

#24  Postby tuco » Apr 20, 2019 3:12 am

omg

I will settle for the wiki article posted on page one - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthymesia

Feel free to edit it with your knowledge and proofs.
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Re: These people recall every moment of every day

#25  Postby LucidFlight » Apr 20, 2019 5:02 am

Thommo wrote:It's quite interesting, but as one might imagine the reality is a little more mundane than the title suggests:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthymesia
Difficulties

Hyperthymestic abilities can have a detrimental effect on cognitive capacity. The constant, irrepressible stream of memories has caused significant disruption to AJ's life. She described her recollection as "non-stop, uncontrollable and totally exhausting" and as "a burden".[1] Like all hyperthymestics, AJ is prone to getting lost in remembering. This can make it difficult to attend to the present or future, as she is permanently living in the past.

AJ displays considerable difficulty in memorizing allocentric information. "Her autobiographical memory, while incredible, is also selective and even ordinary in some respects," – McGaugh.[1] This was demonstrated by AJ's poor performance on standardised memory tests. At school, AJ was an average student, clearly unable to apply her exceptional memory to her studies. Similar patterns have been observed in other cases of hyperthymesia.

Deficits in executive functioning and anomalous lateralisation were also identified in AJ. These cognitive deficiencies are characteristic of frontostriatal disorders.[1]

Even those with a high level of hyperthymesia do not remember exactly everything in their lives or have "perfect memory". Studies have shown that it is a selective ability, as shown by AJ's case, and they have great difficultly with rote memorization and therefore cannot apply their ability to school and work. Their memorization of events tends to exceed their ability to memorize given facts; for example, if you told a hyperthymesiac a fact about the world, they may not remember what you said, but they will more likely remember what you wore and other details of the situation when you told them.


But, Thommo. The evidence. One face, one neuron. Look, it's Halle Berry. The headlines are in no way sensationalised for pop scientific journalism.
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