Disability Hate Crime

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Disability Hate Crime

#1  Postby alienpresence » Apr 09, 2010 8:10 pm

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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#2  Postby I'm With Stupid » Apr 09, 2010 8:33 pm

It's not an area I'm particularly familiar with, but it seems to me that unlike racism, or homophobia, or even hate crimes based on belonging to a particular social group, there isn't that sort of hatred of disabilities. I think the discrimination they receive comes from good old-fashioned bullying. Bullies, whether adults or children, will always pick on vulnerable people. Better still if they're vulnerable people who they can provoke a reaction out of. And people with disabilities, particularly mental disabilities, tend to fit into this group that are vulnerable to bullying more often than anyone else. I don't think it's usually a hatred of disabilities that motivates this though.

But I believe the only purpose of hate crime existing in the first place is to identify those criminals who are likely to have to deal with people like their victim again. Assaulting someone because they're black is different to assaulting someone because you got into an argument with them. When race is the motivating factor, you have someone who is a risk to anyone of the target group, rather than just being a risk to one person in one particular situation. And similarly, if someone is guilty of targeting people incapable of defending themselves with bullying campaigns, they are also a risk to everyone in that particular group, rather than just being a risk to one person in one situation, at one time.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#3  Postby alienpresence » Apr 09, 2010 8:40 pm

I'm With Stupid wrote:It's not an area I'm particularly familiar with, but it seems to me that unlike racism, or homophobia, or even hate crimes based on belonging to a particular social group, there isn't that sort of hatred of disabilities. I think the discrimination they receive comes from good old-fashioned bullying. Bullies, whether adults or children, will always pick on vulnerable people. Better still if they're vulnerable people who they can provoke a reaction out of. And people with disabilities, particularly mental disabilities, tend to fit into this group that are vulnerable to bullying more often than anyone else. I don't think it's usually a hatred of disabilities that motivates this though.


Yes, there is something different here as opposed to the bullying of distinct groups. Disablity can effect anyone so it is really an attack on the standards of society as a whole when the vulnerable disabled are attacked or bullied?
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#4  Postby Tbickle » Apr 09, 2010 9:09 pm

Self-loathing for being such a imbecile that they need to attack those they feel are below them to feel better. I hate bullies.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#5  Postby Spearthrower » Apr 10, 2010 4:59 am

alienpresence wrote:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7570305.stm

Where do we go with this?


Coming from a family with a disabled parent, and having lived on a 'disabled' estate for the latter part of my childhood, I still cannot bring myself to call this a 'crime'. It should be mocked for the ignorance and idiocy that it represents, these people abusing disabled people should be subject to the shame they bring on themselves and their upbringing, but the UK does not need to create more thought crimes.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#6  Postby alienpresence » Apr 10, 2010 5:18 am

Spearthrower wrote:
alienpresence wrote:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7570305.stm

Where do we go with this?


Coming from a family with a disabled parent, and having lived on a 'disabled' estate for the latter part of my childhood, I still cannot bring myself to call this a 'crime'. It should be mocked for the ignorance and idiocy that it represents, these people abusing disabled people should be subject to the shame they bring on themselves and their upbringing, but the UK does not need to create more thought crimes.


I concur with that. There is something intrinsically wrong with a society that requires so many laws to instil what should be intuitive good behaviour. Where it goes wrong is upbringing - not simply by parents but by society as a whole. If children are taught to despise difference, dressed in uniform and told only the best of the best will make it via a highly competitive educational system, what is to be expected?
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#7  Postby Tyrannical » Apr 10, 2010 5:28 am

alienpresence wrote:I concur with that. There is something intrinsically wrong with a society that requires so many laws to instil what should be intuitive good behaviour. Where it goes wrong is upbringing - not simply by parents but by society as a whole. If children are taught to despise difference, dressed in uniform and told only the best of the best will make it via a highly competitive educational system, what is to be expected?


What a surprising observation you've made. Care to guess what that "something" might be :ask:
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#8  Postby alienpresence » Apr 10, 2010 5:41 am

Tyrannical wrote:
alienpresence wrote:I concur with that. There is something intrinsically wrong with a society that requires so many laws to instil what should be intuitive good behaviour. Where it goes wrong is upbringing - not simply by parents but by society as a whole. If children are taught to despise difference, dressed in uniform and told only the best of the best will make it via a highly competitive educational system, what is to be expected?


What a surprising observation you've made. Care to guess what that "something" might be :ask:


Possibly it is individuality that allows for the appreciation of difference? Once subsumed into the collective children will quickly learn to despise those outgroups to the 'norms' fostered by schools. These may have disabilites or be geeks and highly intelligent but if they are in a outlier group they will be subject to taunts.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#9  Postby THWOTH » Apr 10, 2010 7:58 am

The article wrote:"Disabled people are vulnerable and, perhaps, remind people of their own inadequacies; it makes them feel better to put us down."
-- Tom Shakespeare

I think Mr Shakespeare has got it right here. The disabled person can be seen as a 'safe target' by which the bully might boost their own ego. It's a sad reflection on those who think that verbal and physical intimidation of somebody more vulnerable than themselves is acceptable behaviour. Having said that, this is not to diminish the upset and distress the disabled person might feel at being on the receiving end, but the disabled person must understand that they were not the recipient of this simply because they are disabled, but because the bully is a sad, emotionally stunted shit.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#10  Postby Tyrannical » Apr 10, 2010 8:15 am

I blame the youth for not going to Church anymore. :P
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#11  Postby alienpresence » Apr 10, 2010 8:19 am

THWOTH wrote:
The article wrote:"Disabled people are vulnerable and, perhaps, remind people of their own inadequacies; it makes them feel better to put us down."
-- Tom Shakespeare

I think Mr Shakespeare has got it right here. The disabled person can be seen as a 'safe target' by which the bully might boost their own ego. It's a sad reflection on those who think that verbal and physical intimidation of somebody more vulnerable than themselves is acceptable behaviour. Having said that, this is not to diminish the upset and distress the disabled person might feel at being on the receiving end, but the disabled person must understand that they were not the recipient of this simply because they are disabled, but because the bully is a sad, emotionally stunted shit.


This can spread, become acceptable behaviour, if left unchallenged when it occurs in the public arena. Consider nazi germany and how the nazi propaganda machine managed to lull a entire populace into accepting euthenasia of the disabled on 'socio-economic' grounds? It only takes a few & a few following to push a social dynamic in a certain direction - for things to snowball out of hand & beyond recall.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#12  Postby THWOTH » Apr 10, 2010 9:11 am

alienpresence wrote:
THWOTH wrote:
The article wrote:"Disabled people are vulnerable and, perhaps, remind people of their own inadequacies; it makes them feel better to put us down."
-- Tom Shakespeare

I think Mr Shakespeare has got it right here. The disabled person can be seen as a 'safe target' by which the bully might boost their own ego. It's a sad reflection on those who think that verbal and physical intimidation of somebody more vulnerable than themselves is acceptable behaviour. Having said that, this is not to diminish the upset and distress the disabled person might feel at being on the receiving end, but the disabled person must understand that they were not the recipient of this simply because they are disabled, but because the bully is a sad, emotionally stunted shit.


This can spread, become acceptable behaviour, if left unchallenged when it occurs in the public arena. Consider nazi germany and how the nazi propaganda machine managed to lull a entire populace into accepting euthenasia of the disabled on 'socio-economic' grounds? It only takes a few & a few following to push a social dynamic in a certain direction - for things to snowball out of hand & beyond recall.

I agree. It was not so much that the Nazi party was bad (though it was) but that the German people did not have the will to be good. Bullying in all forms should be challenged - that includes the bullying of bullies too.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#13  Postby Spearthrower » Apr 10, 2010 9:17 am

THWOTH wrote:
The article wrote:"Disabled people are vulnerable and, perhaps, remind people of their own inadequacies; it makes them feel better to put us down."
-- Tom Shakespeare

I think Mr Shakespeare has got it right here. The disabled person can be seen as a 'safe target' by which the bully might boost their own ego. It's a sad reflection on those who think that verbal and physical intimidation of somebody more vulnerable than themselves is acceptable behaviour. Having said that, this is not to diminish the upset and distress the disabled person might feel at being on the receiving end, but the disabled person must understand that they were not the recipient of this simply because they are disabled, but because the bully is a sad, emotionally stunted shit.


On the disabled estate I lived in my teenage years, these people would have been sorely surprised for the most part if they thought a disabled person was a soft target. Nearly every disabled person on the estate was an Olympic athlete, extremely fit and more than capable of looking out for themselves!
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#14  Postby Timinane » May 03, 2010 4:27 am

Tyrannical wrote:I blame the youth for not going to Church anymore.


So they can learn how to bully from the professional bullies?

I don't think there is a huge incident in disability hate crime or at least none directed towards my cane wielding person. I'm not an olympic athlete either so am an easy target
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#15  Postby I'm With Stupid » May 03, 2010 3:53 pm

Spearthrower wrote:On the disabled estate I lived in my teenage years, these people would have been sorely surprised for the most part if they thought a disabled person was a soft target. Nearly every disabled person on the estate was an Olympic athlete, extremely fit and more than capable of looking out for themselves!

Hehe, I love stories like that. Like when some little prick attacks an old man who turns out the be an ex-professional boxer and gets his arse handed to him. Some nobhead attacked an old fella I know the other day outside a pub. He's in his mid 70s, I think. Unfortunately for this fella, he's also a red & white belt in judo (i.e. higher than black). He just dropped the fucker and held him down, until some of his drinking mates came out of the pub and "dealt with him." :grin: He said he was contemplating breaking his arm, but decided against it in the end because he'd probably end up being the one in trouble.
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Re: Disability Hate Crime

#16  Postby Teshi » May 19, 2010 12:34 am

dressed in uniform


Just to pick on a pet peeve of mine. School uniforms do not dehumanize or eliminate sensitivity to difference. They do not have an effect on a child's creativity or ability to express him or herself. If he or she wishes to chose to use that particular method of self expression, he or she has after school and the weekends to indulge. During school hours, there are a multitude of other methods of expression, including those that really count-- what you say, what you do, what you read, what you write, what you think etc.

*

At the Canadian schools where I have experience, students do not commonly wear uniforms, but they are also subjected to careful training (for lack of a better word... instruction?) to respect and understand differences of appearance, ability, culture, sexuality* and religion. I have observed many students who are personally nasty to one another but do not use appearance, ability, culture or religion as ammunition. Never do they. It is utterly taboo. Of course it would be lovely if they were nicer to each other on a personality level as well, but some classes unfortunately just get into a bit of a mean culture. The class I was in today had a boy with quite severe physical disabilities which did, simply by virtue of his needs, did set him apart but he worked closely with the other members of his group and in the short time I was there I didn't detect any overt or obvious dislike or frustration.

I think that this kind of indoctrination (heh) actually works. I'm not sure what kind of education (we call it "Character Education", and it's usually just part of other lessons) on this level exists elsewhere in Canada or in the UK, but I think it makes a difference.

*Sexuality is a bit of an exception. It is still in the stages of being introduced into schools at an earlier age, that is to say, education about varying sexualities is. It's still a tough one for many teachers, I think, but there are more and more programs that address this.
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