Empathy/wealth?

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Empathy/wealth?

#1  Postby The Damned » Dec 19, 2010 1:49 pm

Just a side line I thought about on another thread.

Do you think having empathy for your fellow human being or charitable thoughts or such would inhibit your ability to make money, legitimately of course?

In other words is their a correlation between your conscience and your wealth?

Loosely scientists believe that those in higher management particularly in financial orientated institutes tend towards a higher proportion of those people with psychopathic tendencies. Study

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg1 ... suits.html

HE WAS a natural leader, creative, energetic and ambitious. "Mike" had appeared to be the ideal recruit for a fast-growing electronics company. It was only after he got the job that certain less favourable aspects of his behaviour came to light. He couldn't get along with his secretary, he "forgot" to take on less interesting projects, he bullied colleagues and walked out of meetings. But since he'd already complained about his boss to senior management, his boss's concerns were never taken seriously, and the company even singled Mike out as a "high-potential employee".

Perhaps you know someone like Mike. Someone charming, yet aggressive; a manipulative boss who can't be bothered with paperwork; one who constantly switches allegiance as different people become useful. Mike embellished the truth on his application form, failed to document his expense claims and turned out, in the end, to be setting up his own business on ...


Unfortunately you have to be a subscriber to read it but the gist is in a study they found the higher up the pay scale you were the more likely you were to exhibit qualities that are ascribed to psychopathic behaviour. At its extreme a severe disconnection with human emotion especially empathy, and an inability to admit when you have done something illegal or immoral.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychopathy

Psychopathy ( /saɪˈkɒpəθi/[1][2]) was, until 1980, the term used for a personality disorder characterized by an abnormal lack of empathy combined with strongly amoral conduct but masked by an ability to appear outwardly normal. The publication of DSM-III changed the name of this mental disorder to Antisocial Personality Disorder, and also broadened the diagnostic criteria considerably by shifting from clinical inferences to behavioral diagnostic criteria.[3] However, the DSM-V working party is recommending a revision of Antisocial Personality Disorder to include "Antisocial/Psychopathic Type", with the diagnostic criteria having a greater emphasis on character than on behavior.[4] The ICD-10 diagnostic criteria of the World Health Organization also lacks psychopathy as a personality disorder, its 1992 manual including Dissocial (Antisocial) Personality Disorder, which encompasses amoral, antisocial, asocial, psychopathic, and sociopathic personalities.[5]

Despite being currently unused in diagnostic manuals, psychopathy and related terms such as psychopath are still widely used by mental health professionals and laymen alike. In particular, NATO has funded a series of Advanced Study Institutes on psychopathy, both before and after to the publication of DSM-III. Researcher Robert Hare has been a particular champion of the term; his Hare Psychopathy Checklist is the standard tool for differentiating between those with Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) and the subset who are psychopaths. According to this scale, the prevalence of APD is two to three times that of psychopathy.[6]

According to Christopher J. Patrick in his Handbook of Psychopathy, clinicians generally believe that there is neither a cure nor any effective treatment for psychopathy; there are no medications that can instill empathy, while psychopaths who undergo traditional talk therapy only become more adept at manipulating others.[7] However, other researchers suggest that psychopaths may benefit as much as others from psychological treatment, at least in terms of effect on behavior.[8] According to Hare, the consensus among researchers in this area is that psychopathy stems from a specific neurological disorder which is biological in origin and present from birth,[9] although a 2008 review indicated multiple causes and variation between individuals.[10] Hare estimates that about one percent of the population are psychopaths.[11]
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#2  Postby Animavore » Dec 19, 2010 2:01 pm

I'm pretty sure to lie to people about WMDs and cause a war based on the lies so your friends at Halliburton can make money selling weapons constitutes a lack of empathy :ask:
I'm not sure how much it applies all 'round.

EDIT: Was thinking of Lockheed-Martin there but hey, Halliburton is good, too.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#3  Postby The Damned » Dec 19, 2010 2:59 pm

Animavore wrote:I'm pretty sure to lie to people about WMDs and cause a war based on the lies so your friends at Halliburton can make money selling weapons constitutes a lack of empathy :ask:
I'm not sure how much it applies all 'round.

EDIT: Was thinking of Lockheed-Martin there but hey, Halliburton is good, too.


Yeah but then didn't most of the US agree with the war, they were duped.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#4  Postby Loren Michael » Dec 19, 2010 3:30 pm

The Damned wrote:Just a side line I thought about on another thread.

Do you think having empathy for your fellow human being or charitable thoughts or such would inhibit your ability to make money, legitimately of course?


It depends on how you're making your money. Innovations in software and other technology, for example, don't necessarily require much in the way of fucking over your fellow man. Likewise, being an exceptionally talented actor or musician. People in the financial products industry may be a different story.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#5  Postby The Damned » Dec 19, 2010 5:07 pm

Loren Michael wrote:
The Damned wrote:Just a side line I thought about on another thread.

Do you think having empathy for your fellow human being or charitable thoughts or such would inhibit your ability to make money, legitimately of course?


It depends on how you're making your money. Innovations in software and other technology, for example, don't necessarily require much in the way of fucking over your fellow man. Likewise, being an exceptionally talented actor or musician. People in the financial products industry may be a different story.


Good point. Shouldn't it follow though that a good business model needs to be flexible and adaptive finance or not, it also needs an element of social responsibility or people get shafted. Or does it?

The question is if we had empathy and were socially responsible would we necessarily struggle more to get to the top, in a way a psychopath makes more money than an altruist. I was wondering if their would be an empirical way to test the assertion?

Bill Gates was ruthless and what he did was downright illegal in some cases. But by the time the law suits had caught up he was making more money than the payouts in a single month.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#6  Postby Loren Michael » Dec 19, 2010 5:18 pm

Now that you bring it up, I don't think ruthlessness necessarily has anything to do with empathy, nor does illegality. People engaged in competition--in business, in games, whatever--can be, I think, contextually ruthless.

I don't think Bill Gates fits the profile you're trying to put on him, given how he's giving his money away hand over fist.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#7  Postby The Damned » Dec 19, 2010 5:20 pm

Loren Michael wrote:Now that you bring it up, I don't think ruthlessness necessarily has anything to do with empathy, nor does illegality. People engaged in competition--in business, in games, whatever--can be, I think, contextually ruthless.

I don't think Bill Gates fits the profile you're trying to put on him, given how he's giving his money away hand over fist.


Yeah true now he doesn't but then he did, it's often suggested he's aspergers so he has trouble reading people. This will also make empathy harder to come by.

Ok the guy who said "we're doing Gods work" about his bank. Forget the name. There are plenty more.

Ruthlessness is not exactly detrimental to the expression of empathy, but I do think if you are ruthless you will have to be somewhat callous too.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#8  Postby Delvo » Dec 20, 2010 1:54 am

Exactly what was the process for assessing how sociopathic someone was? And, to avoid researcher bias, how were those who did the assessing prevented from having any other information about the subjects?

A nifty follow-up, presuming the methods are valid, would be to apply them to describe the distribution of sociopathy across a wider spectrum of incomes and job positions. I'd suspect that, even given a peak among upper-level executives, there's also a second peak near the bottom.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#9  Postby The Damned » Dec 20, 2010 8:29 pm

Delvo wrote:Exactly what was the process for assessing how sociopathic someone was? And, to avoid researcher bias, how were those who did the assessing prevented from having any other information about the subjects?


Obviously this wont be hard science but it will need to convince psychologists. We cannot measure empathy precisely any more than we can intelligence.


A nifty follow-up, presuming the methods are valid, would be to apply them to describe the distribution of sociopathy across a wider spectrum of incomes and job positions. I'd suspect that, even given a peak among upper-level executives, there's also a second peak near the bottom.


Indeed those who are most psychopathic/sociopathic would probably feature near the bottom too.

Let's say we have a valid group of 10,000 and a valid measure of empathy according to test that determine degrees of such. Would you think it would show that the rich or successful financially would be more likely to be more socio/psychopathic?
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#10  Postby iamthereforeithink » Dec 20, 2010 8:48 pm

I do think there is a high correlation between (almost psychopathic) ruthlessness and ability to succeed in business, even in startups and innovation-oriented industries. Look at Mark Zuckerberg. He screwed a few of his Harvard colleagues on his way to the top. Facebook was not a purely egalitarian endeavor. On the other hand, Linus Torvalds is a nice guy who started an open source revolution, but he doesn't seem to have made much money for himself.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#11  Postby The Damned » Dec 20, 2010 8:53 pm

iamthereforeithink wrote:I do think there is a high correlation between (almost psychopathic) ruthlessness and ability to succeed in business, even in startups and innovation-oriented industries. Look at Mark Zuckerberg. He screwed a few of his Harvard colleagues on his way to the top. Facebook was not a purely egalitarian endeavor. On the other hand, Linus Torvalds is a nice guy who started an open source revolution, but he doesn't seem to have made much money for himself.


That's a nice set of anecdotes, I do think there is scope here for not hard science but something credible.

Thanks for the names I have trouble remembering the names of assholes who got rich on the ripping off others. :D

Linus or linux?
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#12  Postby iamthereforeithink » Dec 20, 2010 9:06 pm

The Damned wrote:
iamthereforeithink wrote:I do think there is a high correlation between (almost psychopathic) ruthlessness and ability to succeed in business, even in startups and innovation-oriented industries. Look at Mark Zuckerberg. He screwed a few of his Harvard colleagues on his way to the top. Facebook was not a purely egalitarian endeavor. On the other hand, Linus Torvalds is a nice guy who started an open source revolution, but he doesn't seem to have made much money for himself.


That's a nice set of anecdotes, I do think there is scope here for not hard science but something credible.

Thanks for the names I have trouble remembering the names of assholes who got rich on the ripping off others. :D

Linus or linux?


The guy's name is Linus. The OS he developed is called Linux. While we are on anecdotes, there are probably counter-examples of "justice" eventually catching up with the most ruthless of them. Jeff Skilling of Enron comes to mind.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#13  Postby The Damned » Dec 20, 2010 9:11 pm

iamthereforeithink wrote:
The Damned wrote:
iamthereforeithink wrote:I do think there is a high correlation between (almost psychopathic) ruthlessness and ability to succeed in business, even in startups and innovation-oriented industries. Look at Mark Zuckerberg. He screwed a few of his Harvard colleagues on his way to the top. Facebook was not a purely egalitarian endeavor. On the other hand, Linus Torvalds is a nice guy who started an open source revolution, but he doesn't seem to have made much money for himself.


That's a nice set of anecdotes, I do think there is scope here for not hard science but something credible.

Thanks for the names I have trouble remembering the names of assholes who got rich on the ripping off others. :D

Linus or linux?


The guy's name is Linus. The OS he developed is called Linux. While we are on anecdotes, there are probably counter-examples of "justice" eventually catching up with the most ruthless of them. Jeff Skilling of Enron comes to mind.


Oh yeah that ones a doozy, how well do you think BP did? I mean in the Iranian Operation Ajax rather than recently. :D

Government got the CIA involved in that one and overthrew a democracy for a Shah all in the name of better oil deals. :D
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#14  Postby tribalypredisposed » Dec 21, 2010 4:45 am

As I posted early on in the "parent" thread, there are a number of clear advantages for those lacking in the empathy department when it comes to getting rich.

I gave the example of my grandfather allowing the theft of his medical advances to avoid them being kept off the market by litigation. Others made millions off of this theft, so the person with empathy lost out and those with no empathy or morals got rich.

Those with a lot of empathy also spend a lot of time and effort helping other people. My mom and her best friend started an orphanage and school in Zambia, and neither was even close to wealthy. The ability to fly to a country one has never been to before with less than a thousand dollars to your name and a vision and to go from there to many acres of land, scores of happy kids, housing, a school with a library and computer center, a farm, etc shows that the two of them could have achieved a lot for themselves if they had chosen to. (http://www.zambianchildrensfund.org/)

And the recent example of a couple who won the lottery and gave 98% of it to charity also shows that those on the high end of the empathy scale have a marked disadvantage when it comes to being wealthy.

I have yet to read the story of the self-made rich person who spent hours doing volunteer work on their way up.

I also think it is obvious that being good at lying confers an advantage, that is the point of lying, and that psychopaths are good liars is not really disputed.

At least at the ends of the bell curve, extreme empathy confers huge disadvanteges when it comes to the acquisition and maintenance of wealth while extreme lack of empathy does the opposite.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#15  Postby The Damned » Dec 21, 2010 7:47 pm

tribalypredisposed wrote:As I posted early on in the "parent" thread, there are a number of clear advantages for those lacking in the empathy department when it comes to getting rich.

I gave the example of my grandfather allowing the theft of his medical advances to avoid them being kept off the market by litigation. Others made millions off of this theft, so the person with empathy lost out and those with no empathy or morals got rich.

Those with a lot of empathy also spend a lot of time and effort helping other people. My mom and her best friend started an orphanage and school in Zambia, and neither was even close to wealthy. The ability to fly to a country one has never been to before with less than a thousand dollars to your name and a vision and to go from there to many acres of land, scores of happy kids, housing, a school with a library and computer center, a farm, etc shows that the two of them could have achieved a lot for themselves if they had chosen to. (http://www.zambianchildrensfund.org/)

And the recent example of a couple who won the lottery and gave 98% of it to charity also shows that those on the high end of the empathy scale have a marked disadvantage when it comes to being wealthy.

I have yet to read the story of the self-made rich person who spent hours doing volunteer work on their way up.

I also think it is obvious that being good at lying confers an advantage, that is the point of lying, and that psychopaths are good liars is not really disputed.

At least at the ends of the bell curve, extreme empathy confers huge disadvanteges when it comes to the acquisition and maintenance of wealth while extreme lack of empathy does the opposite.


QFT I really can't argue with any of that. Thanks for your insight. :D
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#16  Postby Witticism » Dec 23, 2010 1:24 am

The Damned wrote:Do you think having empathy for your fellow human being or charitable thoughts or such would inhibit your ability to make money, legitimately of course?

Short answer ... no.

I'm just bookmarking ... I don't have time to read past the above line at the moment but I wanted to bookmark so I can read later.

Personally I think 'creativity' is a better guide to someone’s ability to ‘create’ wealth.

And what gets lost in these discussions is that, like him or loath him, Bill Gates has created over 135,000 jobs … that’s 135,000 that can put food on their family tables …. Who have to buy food from supermarkets that employee people … and so forth and so on.

Also, Bill Gates pays more in tax than we would in 1000 lifetimes. Alas, these facts tend to go missing in these discussions.

Oh and remeber, 'C grade students hire A grade students' .. think about it :grin:
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#17  Postby Witticism » Dec 23, 2010 1:44 am

The Damned wrote:
tribalypredisposed wrote:As I posted early on in the "parent" thread, there are a number of clear advantages for those lacking in the empathy department when it comes to getting rich.

I gave the example of my grandfather allowing the theft of his medical advances to avoid them being kept off the market by litigation. Others made millions off of this theft, so the person with empathy lost out and those with no empathy or morals got rich.

Those with a lot of empathy also spend a lot of time and effort helping other people. My mom and her best friend started an orphanage and school in Zambia, and neither was even close to wealthy. The ability to fly to a country one has never been to before with less than a thousand dollars to your name and a vision and to go from there to many acres of land, scores of happy kids, housing, a school with a library and computer center, a farm, etc shows that the two of them could have achieved a lot for themselves if they had chosen to. (http://www.zambianchildrensfund.org/)

And the recent example of a couple who won the lottery and gave 98% of it to charity also shows that those on the high end of the empathy scale have a marked disadvantage when it comes to being wealthy.

I have yet to read the story of the self-made rich person who spent hours doing volunteer work on their way up.

I also think it is obvious that being good at lying confers an advantage, that is the point of lying, and that psychopaths are good liars is not really disputed.

At least at the ends of the bell curve, extreme empathy confers huge disadvanteges when it comes to the acquisition and maintenance of wealth while extreme lack of empathy does the opposite.


QFT I really can't argue with any of that. Thanks for your insight. :D


I can.

First of try avoid using the following fallacies:

to make a point as they are easily criticized.


tribalypredisposed wrote:I have yet to read the story of the self-made rich person who spent hours doingvolunteer work on their way up

Well you just need to read more :nod: as appearance isn't all ways at it seems and education - specifically financial education has more to do with a person's ability to create wealth than whether or not they are empathitc.

You could be the least empathetic person in the world and have zero finacial literacy and hence zero wealth.

Or you could be the most empathetic person in the world, a lot of finacial literacy and a lot of wealth.


Here's an anecdote, (seeing as that is what is required in this thread) ...

My twin brother is far wealthier than I am but being twins we are probably identical when it comes to our 'empathy'. I think we probably donate about the same % of our wealth to charity .... but he employees 7 people ... and pays them all more than market value ... plus he helps his client create financial independence so they are not reliant on other taxpayers when they retire.

So by employing 7 people - in essence he is giving 'away' for more wealth than he could donate out of his own pocket.




Appearances are deceptive.


You have to separate the person from the Money.
    Most people are good.

    Some people are bad.

    Some bad people have lots of money.
    Some bad people have no money.

It really is that simple.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#18  Postby tribalypredisposed » Dec 23, 2010 3:49 am

Witticism wrote:
The Damned wrote:
tribalypredisposed wrote:As I posted early on in the "parent" thread, there are a number of clear advantages for those lacking in the empathy department when it comes to getting rich.

I gave the example of my grandfather allowing the theft of his medical advances to avoid them being kept off the market by litigation. Others made millions off of this theft, so the person with empathy lost out and those with no empathy or morals got rich.

Those with a lot of empathy also spend a lot of time and effort helping other people. My mom and her best friend started an orphanage and school in Zambia, and neither was even close to wealthy. The ability to fly to a country one has never been to before with less than a thousand dollars to your name and a vision and to go from there to many acres of land, scores of happy kids, housing, a school with a library and computer center, a farm, etc shows that the two of them could have achieved a lot for themselves if they had chosen to. (http://www.zambianchildrensfund.org/)

And the recent example of a couple who won the lottery and gave 98% of it to charity also shows that those on the high end of the empathy scale have a marked disadvantage when it comes to being wealthy.

I have yet to read the story of the self-made rich person who spent hours doing volunteer work on their way up.

I also think it is obvious that being good at lying confers an advantage, that is the point of lying, and that psychopaths are good liars is not really disputed.

At least at the ends of the bell curve, extreme empathy confers huge disadvanteges when it comes to the acquisition and maintenance of wealth while extreme lack of empathy does the opposite.


QFT I really can't argue with any of that. Thanks for your insight. :D


I can.

First of try avoid using the following fallacies:

to make a point as they are easily criticized.


tribalypredisposed wrote:I have yet to read the story of the self-made rich person who spent hours doingvolunteer work on their way up

Well you just need to read more :nod: as appearance isn't all ways at it seems and education - specifically financial education has more to do with a person's ability to create wealth than whether or not they are empathitc.

You could be the least empathetic person in the world and have zero finacial literacy and hence zero wealth.

Or you could be the most empathetic person in the world, a lot of finacial literacy and a lot of wealth.


Here's an anecdote, (seeing as that is what is required in this thread) ...

My twin brother is far wealthier than I am but being twins we are probably identical when it comes to our 'empathy'. I think we probably donate about the same % of our wealth to charity .... but he employees 7 people ... and pays them all more than market value ... plus he helps his client create financial independence so they are not reliant on other taxpayers when they retire.

So by employing 7 people - in essence he is giving 'away' for more wealth than he could donate out of his own pocket.




Appearances are deceptive.


You have to separate the person from the Money.
    Most people are good.

    Some people are bad.

    Some bad people have lots of money.
    Some bad people have no money.

It really is that simple.


Okay....so...thanks for the heads-up on the fallacies that I have not committed. (?)

Often people need to justify/rationalize their own greed. Paying people to work for you is not "giving away" anything. If you want to discuss the topic of what altruism means I am happy to oblige, or you can just look it up in a dictionary.

Yes, you can do good things and make money as well. I have worked for a company recognized with an award for helping in the community, and the owners are wealthy. So? Have you understood the question posed at the top of the thread? I cannot see how the answer might be yes.

I identified and gave examples of ways in which those who were high in empathy would be at a statistical disadvantage for becoming wealthy and remaining so. I also gave examples of how the opposite was true for those very lacking in empathy. I further stipulated that these were most likely to affect those on each extreme of the bell curve of human empathy. You seem not to know what a bell curve is either; I could post a link but I am hoping you know how to Google.

Many people who become wealthy simply pursue their passions or fill an existing need in the community and work hard at it. My former employers saw the need for a high quality children's book and toy store in the community and they worked very hard, were very organized, and were generous towards the community and the community paid them back with a lot of business. That is all good, and the owners are more empathetic than average for sure, but they are not on the edge of the bell curve ready to risk life and limb to smuggle refugees or start an orphanage in a distant country.

The assignment as I understood it was to identify if and why there would be a statistical variation between the wealthy and poor when it came to empathy. That is what I attempted to contribute an answer to. What you are talking about, I am not sure.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#19  Postby tuco » Dec 23, 2010 4:10 am

There's gotta be correlation between lack of empathy and will to power. If will to power correlates with financial status I would not dare to predict.
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Re: Empathy/wealth?

#20  Postby Witticism » Dec 23, 2010 4:47 am

tribalypredisposed wrote:Okay....so...thanks for the heads-up on the fallacies that I have not committed. (?)


Try Confirmation Bias.

You are finding / giving anecdotes to justify your premis.

I'm saying your premise is wrong.

You have to separate money - an IOU - from the person or characteristic.

In every example you have given - you can't do that. Therefore your argument is specious.


tribalypredisposed wrote:
Often people need to justify/rationalize their own greed.

You're attempting to poison the well there.

Try sticking to just facts.

tribalypredisposed wrote:
Paying people to work for you is not "giving away" anything.

Oh look ....



.... there goes the point.

So if you have no wealth ... and the person next to you has no wealth ... how can you 'give away' anything to each other?

You can put any label on it you like, but as far as providing for and contributing to society - business owners who 'create' jobs do more for society than people who are merely donate a few $ or a few hrs of their time to charity.

The best way to help poor people ... don't be one :nod:


tribalypredisposed wrote:
If you want to discuss the topic of what altruism means I am happy to oblige, or you can just look it up in a dictionary.

:roll:

tribalypredisposed wrote:
Yes, you can do good things and make money as well. I have worked for a company recognized with an award for helping in the community, and the owners are wealthy. So? Have you understood the question posed at the top of the thread? I cannot see how the answer might be yes.

And yet you keep going back to anecdotal evidence ... cough, cough ... biased sample.

tribalypredisposed wrote:
I identified and gave examples of ways in which those who were high in empathy would be at a statistical disadvantage for becoming wealthy and remaining so.


No just anecdote.

Take this one ....

tribalypredisposed wrote:And the recent example of a couple who won the lottery and gave 98% of it to charity also shows that those on the high end of the empathy scale have a marked disadvantage when it comes to being wealthy.

Excusing the biased sample of 1 ... How do you know it was empathy that caused them to give this money away?

It could've been any number of emotions ... particularly narcissism. The urge to 'look good' to their peers may have been a greater driving force for their actions than 'empathy'.

How do you know what was the driving force for their actions? Did you ask them?

Quite frankly I think what they did is incredibly dumb.

Far better to invest 98% of their winnings to create even more wealth from which they'd have more to give away and could in fact help more people.

This is primarily what Warren Buffet has done.

tribalypredisposed wrote:You seem not to know what a bell curve is either; I could post a link but I am hoping you know how to Google.


Has it got something to do with the maker of the Kiowa Helicopter :ask:

Whilst we are making hasty generalisations about each other ... it would appear as though you have no understanding of the concept of leverage, as ...

tribalypredisposed wrote:That is all good, and the owners are more empathetic than average for sure, but they are not on the edge of the bell curve ready to risk life and limb to smuggle refugees or start an orphanage in a distant country.

So smuggling refugees = more empathetic than starting a business which helps to keep a whole community thriving. :ask:

I get it ...

.. you've used your frame of reference for what is 'Empathy' and not a qualitative and unbiased reference.

Well then, in that case I cede the argument to you.

tribalypredisposed wrote:The assignment as I understood it was to identify if and why there would be a statistical variation between the wealthy and poor when it came to empathy. That is what I attempted to contribute an answer to. What you are talking about, I am not sure.


There is none.

Wealth has nothing to do with empathy or lack thereof.

It has all to do with financial literacy, education in general and access to finance.

People are good, bad and indifferent. As they are happy, sad and indifferent - regardless of the amount of money they have.
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