Freedom of Expression in the Internet

Anthropology, Economics, History, Sociology etc.

Moderators: Calilasseia, ADParker

Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#1  Postby Federico » Feb 17, 2012 1:47 pm

At the suggestion of Shrunk, I open this new thread which seems more suitable for discussing what's happening in the world of the Web and, in particular, the efforts made by various Governments to restrict the free downloading of material found in the Web which they consider an attack on copyrights and an act of piracy with consequent loss of gain by the authors, and which many Internet users defend as being another form of freedom of expression.

What is particularly illustrative of this conflict is what's happening in various countries between proponents of ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement), an international treaty aiming to standardize copyright protection measures and seeking to curb trade of counterfeited physical goods, including copyrighted material online, and those who strenuously oppose it arguing that it will stifle freedom of expression on the internet.

In an article written by Dave Lee for BBC News Technology and titled "Acta: Europe braced for protests over anti-piracy treaty", the author mentions that the treaty which intent is to standardize copyright protection measures, has been heavily criticized.
In particular by many people who initially were in favor of the treaty until they came to realize that: "it would limit and withhold the freedom of engagement on the largest and most significant network in human history, and thus may jeopardize the future of our children."

In addition, as I have mentioned in the other thread, critics say the act should really be called the License to Snoop Law. That’s because the bill would give police the power to acquire detailed information about who you are online, without answering to anyone about why.
In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.(Martin Luther King Jr)
User avatar
Federico
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 932
Male

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#2  Postby Federico » Feb 20, 2012 2:24 pm

Apparently Canada is turning into a microcosm of what is happening around the world as a reaction to a barely disguised attempt made by Governments to stifle -- under various excuses -- freedom of expression in the Internet. And the reaction in Canada is turning into a nasty fight where personal facts are thrown to an eager public.

Let’s review the facts which are again in the news thanks to The National Post, which I quote.

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews, is championing a very flawed and hugely unpopular legislation that would grant police and government agencies easier access, to some extent without a warrant, to Canadians' online identities and activities. And he is doing so using arguments that are no less offensive for being laughably idiotic. In the House of Commons, he suggested Canadians <<can either stand with us or with the child pornographers.>>

This has caused, as a reaction, the birth of @vikileaks30, the Twitter account dedicated to embarrassing Mr. Toews.
"Vic wants to know about you. Let's get to know Vic," Vikileaks suggests. So Vikileaks broadcasts some unfortunate purported details of Mr. Toews' divorce proceedings.

This minor fracas raises two important issues: The relevance of politicians' private lives to their public work, and the place (if any) for politicians' private lives in media coverage (Canadians have long enjoyed feeling superior to Americans in this regard.)

The problem is, even if they could prove that empirically correct, their partisan opponents wouldn't care. Rightly or wrongly, to embrace, promote or even acknowledge Vilikeaks - as a remarkable number of opposition MPs have done - is to accept yet further debasement of the Canadian political conversation.

The media's role in this is more tricky. The content of the Vikileaks tweets has been widely known in Ottawa since the events occurred. Yet not a word of it was breathed in the mainstream press, in accordance with the basic Canadian understanding described above.

But now it is all over the news - if not the particulars of Mr. Toews' situation, then the fact that someone is publishing those particulars at a Twitter account called @Vikileaks30.

Media can publish whatever they like, of course (assuming it's true), and politicians can retweet whatever they wish (even if it isn't). But these are questions worth discussing. Twenty years from now, the Conservatives' "lawful access" legislation will, we hope, be a footnote in the history of Canadian politics. The poison of Vikileaks, however, might remain in the well.


Reporting on the same issue The Globe and Mail added (Quote):

"....More than 100,000 people have signed an Openmedia.ca petition opposing the bill, and online comment boards are packed with users expressing concern about its privacy implications....

....Responding to criticism of the bill, the minister declared that opponents stood either with the Conservatives or <<with the child pornographers >>, prompting widespread indignation…..

…..Mr. Toews eventually retreated from the statement, telling CBC Radio host Evan Solomon on Saturday that if the public viewed his comments as inappropriate, he was <<prepared to accept their judgment.>>

....The Conservatives also said they would send the bill directly to a parliamentary committee for review, rather than waiting until after second reading, signaling they are willing to accept a broader range of amendments....

....OpenMedia.ca, an internet privacy group, said the government’s willingness to accept amendments to the bill is a positive step, but it would still prefer to see the legislation scrapped entirely....

....If passed in its current form, the bill would require telecommunications service providers to hand over a name, address, phone numbers, e-mail address and Internet Protocol address to police upon request and without a warrant
....

At this precise moment in time we don't know yet how the brouhaha will be settled but, even if a compromise will probably be negotiated, it's only the first of many other attempt by the authorities to clamp down -- Soviet, Chinese, or dictatorial style -- a media which is fast becoming the message, as Marshall Mac Luhan was fond of quipping.
In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.(Martin Luther King Jr)
User avatar
Federico
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 932
Male

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#3  Postby Federico » Jul 05, 2012 1:17 pm

Federico wrote:At the suggestion of Shrunk, I open this new thread which seems more suitable for discussing what's happening in the world of the Web and, in particular, the efforts made by various Governments to restrict the free downloading of material found in the Web which they consider an attack on copyrights and an act of piracy with consequent loss of gain by the authors, and which many Internet users defend as being another form of freedom of expression.

What is particularly illustrative of this conflict is what's happening in various countries between proponents of ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement), an international treaty aiming to standardize copyright protection measures and seeking to curb trade of counterfeited physical goods, including copyrighted material online, and those who strenuously oppose it arguing that it will stifle freedom of expression on the internet.

In an article written by Dave Lee for BBC News Technology and titled "Acta: Europe braced for protests over anti-piracy treaty", the author mentions that the treaty which intent is to standardize copyright protection measures, has been heavily criticized.
In particular by many people who initially were in favor of the treaty until they came to realize that: "it would limit and withhold the freedom of engagement on the largest and most significant network in human history, and thus may jeopardize the future of our children."


For all of you who are in favor of freedom of expression in the Internet and therefore against the proposed ACTA, there is now reason to cheer.

EU Parliament votes down reviled ACTA treaty
The Globe and Mail

"The European Parliament has overwhelmingly defeated the international ACTA anti-piracy agreement, after fears that it would limit Internet freedom mobilized broad opposition across Europe.

The vote Wednesday was 39 in favour, 478 against, with 165 abstentions.

The defeat means that, as far as the EU is concerned, the treaty is dead — at least for the moment — though other countries may participate. A spokesman for the European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, said it may try again after it obtains a court ruling on whether the agreement violates fundamental EU rights.
Supporters said ACTA — the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement — was needed to standardize international laws that protect the intellectual property rights. Opponents feared it would lead to censorship and a loss of privacy on the Internet."
In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.(Martin Luther King Jr)
User avatar
Federico
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 932
Male

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#4  Postby Minimolas » Nov 24, 2012 8:13 am

Image

Even though many laws that spit on the faces of the founding fathers have been passed, such as the Patriot Act and the National Defense Authorization Act, the people refuse to give up the internet.

While it frustrates me to see that very few people know about the extreme danger their rights are in right now, it's absolutely beautiful to see things like SOPA get shot down. I saw an incredible amount of websites talk about it and stand up against it, educating people in the process.

I believe people simply aren't educated about these sorta things, mainly because Fox News, MSNBC, CNN and the other mainstream media outlets don't talk about them. Why would the media expose the people they're working for? ;)
Atheist. Anarcho-capitalist.
User avatar
Minimolas
 
Name: Nicholas
Posts: 81
Male

Country: America
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#5  Postby Federico » Apr 06, 2013 2:52 pm

I revive this thread by reporting what has happened recently in France. (Quote):

"Following the posting of an antisemitic and racist post by anonymous users, Twitter removed those posts from its service. Lawsuits were filed by the Union of Jewish Students (UEJF), a French advocacy group and, on 24 January 2013, Judge Anne-Marie Sauteraud ordered Twitter to divulge the Personally identifiable information about the user who posted the antisemitic post, charging that the posts violated French laws against hate speech. Twitter responded by saying that it was "reviewing its options" regarding the French charges. Twitter was given two weeks to comply with the court order before daily fines of €1,000 (about US$1,300) would be assessed. Issues over jurisdiction arise, because Twitter has no offices nor employees within France, so it is unclear how a French court could sanction Twitter."

Given the rapidly growing role played by the Internet in everyday life, the legitimacy of Internet censorship has recently been questioned, as can be read in Wikipedia (Quote):

"Internet censorship is the control or suppression of what can be accessed, published, or viewed on the internet. It may be carried out by governments, private organizations at the behest of government, regulators, or on their own initiative. Individuals and organizations may engage in self-censorship for moral, religious, or business reasons, to conform to societal norms, due to intimidation, or out of fear of legal or other consequences.

Opinions on the topic of Internet censorship vary, with arguments being made both for and against censorship. Moreover, the extent of Internet censorship varies on a country-to-country basis. While some countries have little Internet censorship, other countries go as far as to limit the access of information such as news and suppress discussion among citizens. Internet censorship also occurs in response to or in anticipation of events such as elections, protests, and riots. An example is the increased censorship due to the events of the Arab Spring. Other areas of censorship includes copyrights, defamation, harassment, and obscene material."
In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.(Martin Luther King Jr)
User avatar
Federico
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 932
Male

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#6  Postby Federico » Apr 07, 2013 3:08 pm

I must apologize for the unwanted and possibly unlawful reproduction of posts written last year for this Thread. All I wanted to do was to quote only one of my own.
In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.(Martin Luther King Jr)
User avatar
Federico
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 932
Male

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#7  Postby Trevor » Aug 18, 2013 6:15 am

the net should be 100% free speech.

you should literally be able to say or post anything you want, and it should be up to the end user to block content.
User avatar
Trevor
Banned Troll
 
Posts: 244

Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#8  Postby WalterMitty » Aug 18, 2013 6:33 am

Trevor wrote:the net should be 100% free speech.

you should literally be able to say or post anything you want, and it should be up to the end user to block content.


No.
WalterMitty
 
Posts: 580

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#9  Postby Trevor » Aug 19, 2013 6:44 am

I say YES because it should be up to the user what they look at or read.

For example, if you don't like gambling then don't go into a betting shop etc...
User avatar
Trevor
Banned Troll
 
Posts: 244

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#10  Postby WalterMitty » Aug 19, 2013 7:21 am

Trevor wrote:I say YES because it should be up to the user what they look at or read.

For example, if you don't like gambling then don't go into a betting shop etc...


Spoken like a true teenager.
WalterMitty
 
Posts: 580

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#11  Postby mindhack » Aug 19, 2013 7:45 am

WalterMitty wrote:
Trevor wrote:I say YES because it should be up to the user what they look at or read.

For example, if you don't like gambling then don't go into a betting shop etc...


Spoken like a true teenager.

So what, fossil. You have a point to make?
(Ignorance --> Mystery) < (Knowledge --> Awe)
mindhack
 
Name: Van Amerongen
Posts: 2668
Male

Country: Zuid-Holland
Netherlands (nl)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#12  Postby WalterMitty » Aug 19, 2013 8:02 am

mindhack wrote:
WalterMitty wrote:
Trevor wrote:I say YES because it should be up to the user what they look at or read.

For example, if you don't like gambling then don't go into a betting shop etc...


Spoken like a true teenager.

So what, fossil. You have a point to make?


Yes, its that thing flying over your head.
WalterMitty
 
Posts: 580

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#13  Postby mindhack » Aug 19, 2013 8:14 am

WalterMitty wrote:
mindhack wrote:
WalterMitty wrote:
Trevor wrote:I say YES because it should be up to the user what they look at or read.

For example, if you don't like gambling then don't go into a betting shop etc...


Spoken like a true teenager.

So what, fossil. You have a point to make?


Yes, its that thing flying over your head.

No?
(Ignorance --> Mystery) < (Knowledge --> Awe)
mindhack
 
Name: Van Amerongen
Posts: 2668
Male

Country: Zuid-Holland
Netherlands (nl)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#14  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Aug 19, 2013 8:47 am

Frederico, I apologise if I missed it, but what is your view on the issue?
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
User avatar
Thomas Eshuis
 
Name: Thomas Eshuis
Posts: 31088
Age: 31
Male

Country: Netherlands
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#15  Postby WalterMitty » Aug 19, 2013 8:51 am

Firstly, I think there is a certain irony in someone advocating "100% freedom of speech [where] you should be able to say or post anything you want", as a member of a forum with a FUA.

Secondly, dont like the 'regular' internet and its rules, codes of conduct and etiquette? Well there already is a "100% freedom of speech" web, you just need TOR to access it.

Thirdly, trevor used gambling as an example. Gambling is legal (well, the type he alluded to is). If you dont like gambling, "dont go into the shop". Thats great advice, and pretty easy to follow; gambling 'shops' are typically clearly advertised as such. One wouldnt go into a store that looked like, say, a supermarket on the outside, but was actually a gambling 'shop' inside.

On the internet trevor is proposing, I could follow a link to what appeared to be a blog for investing, but when I click that last link I am confronted with CP. Or hate speech. The power of choosing what I do not want to see/read is taken away from me.
WalterMitty
 
Posts: 580

Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#16  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Aug 19, 2013 8:53 am

WalterMitty wrote:Firstly, I think there is a certain irony in someone advocating "100% freedom of speech [where] you should be able to say or post anything you want", as a member of a forum with a FUA.

Not really. This is a private site and thus subject to the whims of the owner. You cannot draw an analogy to the worldwideweb as a whole.
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
User avatar
Thomas Eshuis
 
Name: Thomas Eshuis
Posts: 31088
Age: 31
Male

Country: Netherlands
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#17  Postby WalterMitty » Aug 19, 2013 8:56 am

Thomas Eshuis wrote:
WalterMitty wrote:Firstly, I think there is a certain irony in someone advocating "100% freedom of speech [where] you should be able to say or post anything you want", as a member of a forum with a FUA.

Not really. This is a private site and thus subject to the whims of the owner.


So trevor is comfortable with curbing his rights to 100% free speech.
WalterMitty
 
Posts: 580

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#18  Postby Trevor » Aug 19, 2013 10:53 am

WalterMitty wrote:Firstly, I think there is a certain irony in someone advocating "100% freedom of speech [where] you should be able to say or post anything you want", as a member of a forum with a FUA.

Secondly, dont like the 'regular' internet and its rules, codes of conduct and etiquette? Well there already is a "100% freedom of speech" web, you just need TOR to access it.

Thirdly, trevor used gambling as an example. Gambling is legal (well, the type he alluded to is). If you dont like gambling, "dont go into the shop". Thats great advice, and pretty easy to follow; gambling 'shops' are typically clearly advertised as such. One wouldnt go into a store that looked like, say, a supermarket on the outside, but was actually a gambling 'shop' inside.

On the internet trevor is proposing, I could follow a link to what appeared to be a blog for investing, but when I click that last link I am confronted with CP. Or hate speech. The power of choosing what I do not want to see/read is taken away from me.


can just do the same with online material - warnings could be given on links (ie: hate speech, pornography etc.) - people just want big brother / nanny to protect them.
1
Now if you don't want to see porn , violence , hate etc.. then go look at bbc.com or something - sheesh, not rocket science
User avatar
Trevor
Banned Troll
 
Posts: 244

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#19  Postby Trevor » Aug 19, 2013 10:54 am

WalterMitty wrote:
Thomas Eshuis wrote:
WalterMitty wrote:Firstly, I think there is a certain irony in someone advocating "100% freedom of speech [where] you should be able to say or post anything you want", as a member of a forum with a FUA.

Not really. This is a private site and thus subject to the whims of the owner.


So trevor is comfortable with curbing his rights to 100% free speech.



no he isn't ,but this site is fairly reasonable, though as all forums does have it's pet PC issues, it seems.
User avatar
Trevor
Banned Troll
 
Posts: 244

Print view this post

Re: Freedom of Expression in the Internet

#20  Postby Thomas Eshuis » Aug 19, 2013 10:58 am

WalterMitty wrote:
Thomas Eshuis wrote:
WalterMitty wrote:Firstly, I think there is a certain irony in someone advocating "100% freedom of speech [where] you should be able to say or post anything you want", as a member of a forum with a FUA.

Not really. This is a private site and thus subject to the whims of the owner.


So trevor is comfortable with curbing his rights to 100% free speech.

You'd have to ask him.
"Respect for personal beliefs = "I am going to tell you all what I think of YOU, but don't dare retort and tell what you think of ME because...it's my personal belief". Hmm. A bully's charter and no mistake."
User avatar
Thomas Eshuis
 
Name: Thomas Eshuis
Posts: 31088
Age: 31
Male

Country: Netherlands
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Next

Return to Social Sciences & Humanities

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 1 guest