Racial segregation at your nearest hairdressers.

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Racial segregation at your nearest hairdressers.

#1  Postby Keep It Real » Feb 14, 2018 8:08 am

So my Zambian lady friend went to the local hairdressers and they said "sorry; we don't cut black people's hair." She was very upset about this and cried many times over it. I did some research and it turns out this is overwhelmingly the case in hairdressers in the West; if not globally. I fail to see how this is justifiable - it's not rocket science; it's hairdressing. Court date coming up for terrorising that target. Really looking forward to it actually. :coffee:

Edit: typo
Last edited by Keep It Real on Feb 14, 2018 4:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Racial segregation at your nearest hairdressers.

#2  Postby surreptitious57 » Feb 14, 2018 8:22 am

You will not help one bit if you go terrorising as you did before so please refrain from doing so
Go and report them to the council if you want to do something productive about the situation
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Re: Racial segregation at your nearest hairdressers.

#3  Postby Keep It Real » Feb 14, 2018 8:43 am

surreptitious57 wrote:You will not help one bit if you go terrorising as you did before so please refrain from doing so

I never said I was going to. The job's done.

Go and report them to the council if you want to do something productive about the situation

I've got a court date coming up about it - potentially far more penetrative than writing a letter to the council I reckon.
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Re: Racial segregation at your nearest hairdressers.

#4  Postby Keep It Real » Feb 14, 2018 12:46 pm

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Re: Racial segregation at your nearest hairdressers.

#5  Postby felltoearth » Feb 14, 2018 1:03 pm

Well, natural black hair is different and requires different techniques for cutting and styling. Not really an excuse to be rude or ignorant about it. And stylists do require qualifications to work in salons in the UK is my understanding.

“Why is it so hard to get my hair cut?” Stylist investigates the high street inequality for afro-haired women | Stylist
“In today’s multicultural society, it’s a damning indictment of the industry that a salon shouldn’t be able to service any hair type,” agrees Joseph Roberts, signature stylist at London salon Gielly Green, a rare gem in a city of salons whose website, menu and staff are all indicative of the multicultural society we live in. So why is it that in 2017, the vast majority of hairdressers don’t know how to style afro hair?

“Training for afro hair has long been a completely separate module to the [widely accepted] hairdressing NVQ,” reveals Roberts. “Until recently, students had to pay more to learn to do afro hair.”When you’re a young student with limited funding, extra modules aren’t likely to be on the top of your spending agenda. Thankfully, change is underway in this department. “It’s only right that the curriculum reflects our multicultural society,” explains Diane Mitchell, City & Guilds’ technical advisor for hair and beauty who develops the curriculum for the hairdressing NVQ. “Since 2015, all students have been required to have knowledge of working within the four hair classifications: from heavy straight hair right up to extremely curly, coiled or kinky hair, including afro hair.” In theory, it should only be a matter of time before more widely trained stylists enter your local salon. But it’s clear we need to keep up pressure on salons to prioritise these customers in the services they offer, and ensure stylists keep up the skills so they remain current, competent and – crucially – confident.
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