Careers that let you work with your hands

and have attention to detail

Student life.

Moderators: Blip, DarthHelmet86

Careers that let you work with your hands

#1  Postby inkaStepa » Apr 12, 2012 8:13 pm

I've decided I'm not going to become a doctor. I really would like to be some kind of artist but not stictly and artist- I was thinking maybe engineering? I love to work on things and I am very detail-oriented. The thing is, I have 2 years until I get my biology bachelors and I think switching to engineering (this is already my 4th undergrad year so I'm behind as it is) would set me off too far behind. Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated.
inkaStepa
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 463
Age: 26
Female

Country: United States
United States (us)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#2  Postby laklak » Apr 12, 2012 8:31 pm

Engineers, at least in the states, don't get to work with their hands. If you truly want to work with your hands, get into something like cabinet making, finish carpentry, or other trade. At this point in time you'll probably make more money than an engineer, you'll have the satisfaction of doing something you love, and women like it (it's that whole Harrison Ford carpenter thing).

Conversely, buy an old house and fix it up yourself, you'll get plenty of hands-on experience I promise you. When you're finished with that build wooden ship models (or full on wooden boats!). It doesn't get any more exacting or detail oriented than that.

EDIT: This is a project I'd like to take on (and maybe even finish) before I pop my clogs. It's a copy of a 1940 Chris Craft barrelback inboard. Plans are only $195, I figure 4 - 5 years of construction time and probably in excess of $25,000, but man - can you imagine tooling up to the local water pub in this thing with a 454 rumbling in back?

Image
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. - Mark Twain
The sky is falling! The sky is falling! - Chicken Little
I never go without my dinner. No one ever does, except vegetarians and people like that - Oscar Wilde
User avatar
laklak
RS Donator
 
Name: Florida Man
Posts: 15238
Age: 62
Male

Country: The Great Satan
Swaziland (sz)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#3  Postby inkaStepa » Apr 12, 2012 8:43 pm

I'm a girl! Lol I thought engineers did work on things like models? The men in my family are auto mechanics and I've always thought it would easy to just do that but I always went along with my moms wishes and didn't take it up but I really wish I had now.
inkaStepa
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 463
Age: 26
Female

Country: United States
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#4  Postby paceetrate » Apr 12, 2012 8:47 pm

Maybe go towards something that would benefit from having a bachelors in biology? Maybe paleontology or anthropology? Get to dig around in the dirt a bit with those two, at least. Work for a zoo, maybe?
User avatar
paceetrate
 
Posts: 601
Age: 32
Female

United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#5  Postby laklak » Apr 12, 2012 8:51 pm

Lol, my bad, didn't look closely. OK, guys will dig it. I think architects build models, but most engineers sit in front of a computer all day. Nobody even does their own drawing or drafting any more. Mechanics are different, they actually do the work. My daughter wanted to be a motorcycle mechanic but got sidetracked into something else, I always thought that was a shame, she's got a good spatial mind and grasp of all things mechanical. Go for big truck mechanics - nothing like a girl in diesel stained overalls!
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. - Mark Twain
The sky is falling! The sky is falling! - Chicken Little
I never go without my dinner. No one ever does, except vegetarians and people like that - Oscar Wilde
User avatar
laklak
RS Donator
 
Name: Florida Man
Posts: 15238
Age: 62
Male

Country: The Great Satan
Swaziland (sz)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#6  Postby Mazille » Apr 12, 2012 8:54 pm

How about a career as a designer/maker of jewellery? I'm not kidding. Two girls I know trained to be goldsmiths and went from that to designing bling.
They work with their hands (or used to, but still know how to do it), get to be creative and get to melt, weld and hammer metals and shit. Sounds to me like that's what you're looking for. That said, I guess it's sort of a hit-or-miss industry. Either you get enough costumers or you don't. One of those girls makes more money at 25 than I probably ever will. The other makes less than I do as a 20-hour-a-week-barkeep/student. In fact, she'd make less than me if I were only worked 10 hours a week.
- Pam.
- Yes?
- Get off the Pope.
User avatar
Mazille
RS Donator
 
Posts: 18308
Age: 31
Male

Austria (at)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#7  Postby inkaStepa » Apr 12, 2012 8:59 pm

^^Thats' the thing- I need to invest in something that I can make money with for sure after I graduate. I have to support myself (I'm 21) I just know that I'm not going to want to do anything with my bio bachelors if I keep pursuing it.
inkaStepa
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 463
Age: 26
Female

Country: United States
United States (us)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#8  Postby Mazille » Apr 12, 2012 9:07 pm

Working on a bio bachelor myself, while finishing my Mass Media and Communication bachelor. Meanwhile I work as a barkeep/barista/waiter as well as freelance journalist and editor to pay my bills.
I still have no idea what I want to do with my degrees once I have them, although I am 26 already. :dunno: All I can really say is: Work towards getting the job you can imagine doing for at least a decade, while at the same time being able to feed yourself and have a roof over your head without getting into debts for the next 50 years.

Seems to me like quite the reasonable approach.
- Pam.
- Yes?
- Get off the Pope.
User avatar
Mazille
RS Donator
 
Posts: 18308
Age: 31
Male

Austria (at)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#9  Postby orpheus » Apr 12, 2012 11:39 pm

Electrician or plumber - they are important jobs and can make you some very good money.

And I'll second laklak's suggestion of cabinetry. When I was a teenager I spent a few summers helping out a family friend who was an excellent cabinetmaker. Very satisfying work. I really loved seeing things take shape.
Let's try for peace in 2017, shall we?
User avatar
orpheus
 
Posts: 7268
Age: 52
Male

Country: New York, USA
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#10  Postby DougC » Apr 13, 2012 12:02 am

Architects dont usualy build any models once they leave university. Architectural models are usualy made by specialist model builders, in the U.K. there are college courses in this, prob the same in the States. There is always the TV/film industry, your biology bachelors may be usefull in that (better gore). Local theater groups are always on the lookout for willing hands to help with set building. No pay but you will get experience and will see if you like it. Being a designer/maker of jewellery could be an option but also requires an artistic flair.
I'm 39 and still have no idea what I want to be when I grow up, so dont panic.
I saw the boat that Laklak wants to build in Devon a few years ago. Stunning.
To do, is to be (Socrate)
To be, is to do (Sartre)
Do be do be do (Sinatra)
SUBWAY(1985)
DougC
 
Posts: 14005
Age: 44
Male

Country: UNITED Kingdom
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#11  Postby I'm With Stupid » Apr 13, 2012 12:10 am

There's a massive shortage of watch makers at the moment, and a lot of them are getting towards the end of their careers, so it's not likely to get better quickly. That means they can command quite a decent salary. Initial training takes 2 years though, and it costs a fortune, so you'd have to get a watch company to pay for your training (which they will if you're willing to work for them at apprentice wages while you train).
Image
User avatar
I'm With Stupid
 
Posts: 8483
Age: 32
Male

Country: Morocco
Jolly Roger (arr)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#12  Postby orpheus » Apr 13, 2012 12:41 am

This may sound outré, but fountain pen repair is worth a look. There is a sizable subculture of pen collectors (I'm one), and a steady stream of work for repairing or customizing vintage and modern pens. There are a handful of people who do this at a really high level, and they are able to make a not so bad living at it.

I'm not sure how you would go about training, but fountainpennetwork.com is a good place to start looking around. (Beware, if you like this sort of thing, you might become a collector too. That's a dangerous site.)
Let's try for peace in 2017, shall we?
User avatar
orpheus
 
Posts: 7268
Age: 52
Male

Country: New York, USA
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#13  Postby LIZard » Apr 17, 2012 1:29 am

I have to say that the jewelry making idea is a really good one. At my school I have taken the jewelry class they offer multiple times and I absolutely love it; my teacher is even nice enough to let me into the shop to work during my free periods. You could try jewelry making as a hobby and see where it takes you from there. I know of some people who in their free time make jewelry, give it to local shops, and have the stores sell their jewelry and they get part of the profit. In addition to the school shop, I have bought some supplies such as metal and a jewelry saw to make my own jewelry at home and I buff and solder things at school, but unfortunately you may not have that convenience. I also have though about being a watchmaker, partly because I'm kind of a steampunk nerd. Also, to quote Albert Einstein, "The release of atom power has changed everything except our way of thinking... The solution to this problem lies in the heart of mankind. If only I had known, I should have become a watchmaker." So watchmaking is always an option (Oddly enough, I am wearing a ring at the moment that has an old women's watch soldered to it). Also, I do not know if you play any instruments, but I play guitar and I am considering making custom guitars for people- i get to work with my hands, and if I become well renowned, then I may be able to make guitars for famous musicians and meet them which I find cool, so you could always try to make instruments. Unfortunately, I'm not sure in the future those jobs will be in high demand though, but i don't really know. Auto mechanic might be fun, you could pursue things in architecture, construction and manufacturing possible, but what do I know
LIZard
 
Posts: 1

United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#14  Postby Macdoc » Apr 17, 2012 2:43 am

OP
One of the neatest careers is a medical illustrator - combines both art and a sound medical and scientific knowledge and definitely requires hand skills.

There is a growing demand

Talk to Mike O'Hanlon here and he can give you details on what courses etc you need

Image

http://www.imagineeringart.com/

demo reels

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIBLC4E654Q&context=C44268feADvjVQa1PpcFNuhzOnnjXCW7E3nGMpxHDJ1P49EDObr8U=[/youtube]

more here

http://www.youtube.com/user/imagineeringart

http://www.imagineeringart.com/Portfoli ... olios.html

You work with a variety of other technical artists but the key is your pre-med training combined with fine art skills.
You can walk out of the courses directly into a well paid field.

( Mike was my biz partner way back when - if you PM me I will give you his email tho it's likely on the site
User avatar
Macdoc
 
Posts: 10259
Age: 69
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#15  Postby inkaStepa » Apr 17, 2012 8:04 pm

^I would love to be an artist of some kind, that is a very good idea and one I've thought about but I thought it was a very hard job to land.

In all honesty, I would love to be an artist. I just like to create and run with ideas. I've never been formally trained or taken any classes though because I'm not confident enough in my skills. I want a job that is stable and honored socially...I'm already 21 and will be 22 in the fall. All of my friends are getting their own apartments and moving out but I'm still an undergrad and lost in what to do. I made an appointment with an advisor.

I figure I can do art on the side while working my real job, but finding what I'd like that real job to be is killing me.
inkaStepa
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 463
Age: 26
Female

Country: United States
United States (us)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#16  Postby campermon » Apr 17, 2012 8:18 pm

Masseur?

Hands on and requires medical knowledge.

;)
Scarlett and Ironclad wrote:Campermon,...a middle aged, middle class, Guardian reading, dad of four, knackered hippy, woolly jumper wearing wino and science teacher.
User avatar
campermon
Moderator
 
Posts: 17032
Age: 46
Male

United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#17  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 17, 2012 8:23 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/24/magaz ... wanted=all

The Case for Working With Your Hands



By MATTHEW B. CRAWFORD
Published: May 21, 2009

The television show “Deadliest Catch” depicts commercial crab fishermen in the Bering Sea. Another, “Dirty Jobs,” shows all kinds of grueling work; one episode featured a guy who inseminates turkeys for a living. The weird fascination of these shows must lie partly in the fact that such confrontations with material reality have become exotically unfamiliar. Many of us do work that feels more surreal than real. Working in an office, you often find it difficult to see any tangible result from your efforts. What exactly have you accomplished at the end of any given day? Where the chain of cause and effect is opaque and responsibility diffuse, the experience of individual agency can be elusive. “Dilbert,” “The Office” and similar portrayals of cubicle life attest to the dark absurdism with which many Americans have come to view their white-collar jobs.

Related
'Shop Class as Soulcraft,' by Matthew B. Crawford: Making Things Work (June 7, 2009)

'Shop Class as Soulcraft,' by Matthew B. Crawford: Real Men Don’t Eat Quiche, They Ride Hogs Over It (May 29, 2009)



High-school shop-class programs were widely dismantled in the 1990s as educators prepared students to become “knowledge workers.” The imperative of the last 20 years to round up every warm body and send it to college, then to the cubicle, was tied to a vision of the future in which we somehow take leave of material reality and glide about in a pure information economy. This has not come to pass. To begin with, such work often feels more enervating than gliding. More fundamentally, now as ever, somebody has to actually do things: fix our cars, unclog our toilets, build our houses.

When we praise people who do work that is straightforwardly useful, the praise often betrays an assumption that they had no other options. We idealize them as the salt of the earth and emphasize the sacrifice for others their work may entail. Such sacrifice does indeed occur — the hazards faced by a lineman restoring power during a storm come to mind. But what if such work answers as well to a basic human need of the one who does it? I take this to be the suggestion of Marge Piercy’s poem “To Be of Use,” which concludes with the lines “the pitcher longs for water to carry/and a person for work that is real.” Beneath our gratitude for the lineman may rest envy...
"We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
Clive Durdle
 
Name: Clive Durdle
Posts: 4763

Country: UK
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#18  Postby AlohaChris » Apr 17, 2012 8:24 pm

Inka, why have you ruled out medicine/surgery?
"Supernatural divinities are the primitive's answer for why the sun goes down at night."
- Cavil of Cylon
User avatar
AlohaChris
RS Donator
 
Name: Chris
Posts: 4453
Age: 46
Male

Country: Uhmerikah
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#19  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 17, 2012 8:28 pm

Richard Sennett The Craftsman.

Actually his trilogy.
"We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
Clive Durdle
 
Name: Clive Durdle
Posts: 4763

Country: UK
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Re: Careers that let you work with your hands

#20  Postby Clive Durdle » Apr 17, 2012 8:32 pm

Build yourself a home you love for $3,000?

http://clivedurdle.wordpress.com/2011/0 ... s-for-all/
"We cannot slaughter each other out of the human impasse"
Clive Durdle
 
Name: Clive Durdle
Posts: 4763

Country: UK
United Kingdom (uk)
Print view this post

Next

Return to Student Life

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 1 guest