Sustainable house planning

Tablelands tropical Australia

Architecture, graphic design, your projects.

Moderators: Calilasseia, Blip, ADParker

Re: Sustainable house planning

#21  Postby felltoearth » Jan 04, 2016 7:12 pm

I say we ignore the noise.
"Walla Walla Bonga!" — Witticism
User avatar
felltoearth
 
Posts: 11617
Age: 52

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Sustainable house planning

#22  Postby kiore » Jan 05, 2016 12:29 am


!
GENERAL MODNOTE
A reminder that the topic of this thread is "Sustainable House Planning: Tablelands tropical Australia" and this thread is in the Technical Design and Engineering forum.
This is not a place to debate what is or isn't a sustainable house in some other place.
Further off topic posts may be removed without notice.
Folding@Home Team member.
Image
What does this stuff mean?
Read here:
general-science/folding-home-team-182116-t616.html
User avatar
kiore
Senior Moderator
 
Posts: 15976

Country: In transit.
United States (us)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#23  Postby Macdoc » Jan 05, 2016 12:45 am

The house is transportable which is why it's designed that way....I'd guess 4 flat beds or maybe 5.
The breezeways provide a lot of airflow - sound isolation, roof space for solar panels and the two bedrooms on the right or nearest in the render below

Image

provide the potential for one or two AirBnB guests. We are only allowed one building on the property and with one + acres we can sprawl a bit.

We already have solar hot water and solar panels on the existing house in Cairns....this would allow more panels and perhaps allow us to go off grid with the inclusion of a Tesla battery wall if prices come down enough.

We are close enough to the equator that the sun switches overhead from slightly north to slightly south so orienting the house to follow that seasonal path will optimize the gain without mechanical tracking.

Sound isolation tho is a big factor. I will continue to be working from Australia as I do now for three months and that puts busy time in the middle of the night in Australia. So my bedroom office is completely on the other side of the house from Jude's and I can be messy and loud >:)

Jude is a research nurse and admitted OCD....we tolerate each other's foibles and meet in the middle on the kitchen tho I do think I'm more flexible....0:)

We intend to put a vertical bar gate on each breezeway and perhaps lose some of the internal breezeway doors to simple openings.It's fun to chase the resources and we expect many changes before it becomes a reality. :coffee:

By the time we are ready we expect some more drop in solar cost.

Q Solar specialises in clean, green, renewable power for your home or business. We sell photovoltaic grid connect solar power systems, stand-alone solar systems, hot water heat pumps, generators, regulators, and anything else required for small to large energy systems.

To find out more about NQ Solar, click here

ABOUT THE ATHERTON TABLELANDS

The Atherton Tablelands (also known as the Cairns Highlands) are located south-west of Cairns, with a population of around 12,000.

The area is home to the World Heritage listed Wet Tropics rainforest, national parks, mountains, lakes and picturesque waterfalls. The region has a mild tropical climate with cool summer nights and mild, sunny winter days. The tablelands covers a diverse range of landscapes, from the outback area around Mareeba and Koah, to the lush rainforest areas around Kuranda, Yungaburra and Malanda.

GREEN POWER ON THE TABLELANDS

Nearly 20 megawatts of mains power is provided by clean electricity sources on the Atherton Tablelands.

The Koombooloomba Hydro station provides 7 megawatts of clean, green hydro-electricity from the waters of Koombooloomba Dam. The station saves 20,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases every year. The water from Koombooloomba Hydro is captured a second time, at the Kareeya Hydro station at the Tully River, which generates a further 86 megawatts of green power.

windy-hillAt the Southern end of the Atherton Tablelands, near Ravenshoe, the Windy Hill Wind Farm is in operation, providing an addition green power source for the region. Windy Hill is Queensland’s largest wind farm, with 20 windmills providing 12 megawatts of electricity: enough to provide power for 3500 Tableland homes.

SOLAR FOR TABLELAND HOMES

NQ Solar can help Tablelands residents and business with any enquiry into solar electricity. We specialise in photovoltaic grid connect systems and stand-alone solar systems.

Grid Connect solar systems are now more affordable than ever, and with generous Government incentives now available, it’s never been easier to cut your family’s carbon footprint, as well as your quarterly power bill. The Solar Credits Scheme provides generous upfront discounts on the installation of solar power, based on the value of Small-scale Technology Certificates. The scheme is NOT means tested, and is available for residential, commercial and investment properties.

- See more at: http://www.nqsolar.com.au/about-us/tabl ... jGlm1.dpuf


We may opt out entirely as even better than here in Ontario ....the power in the area is already green so might better spend the dollars on other aspects. We'll look at a 15 year ROI and see if it makes sense.

We'll put in rain water tanks tho the water available is solid. There was good reason many moved here in the 60s and 70s to "escape" as the climate is mild and anything grows.

It is neat to see what is coming available as resources. Some form of EV is in the works as well......likely a plug in hybrid given distances and steep terrain. Some big savings there as fuel is expensive and if we can tap solar directly for that - would be a positive step.
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 15763
Age: 72
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#24  Postby tuco » Jan 15, 2017 2:17 pm

Hopefully I am in the right thread:

Designed for the kitchen, Zera™ Food Recycler reduces food waste by over two-thirds its original volume through a fully automated process. The result is ready-to-use fertilizer within 24 hours* that you can spread on your lawn, outdoor plants, and garden, making Zera™ Food Recycler the easy-to-use solution for sending less food to the landfill, and more to your land.


https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/zera ... cling--2#/
tuco
 
Posts: 15246

Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#25  Postby laklak » Jan 15, 2017 3:54 pm

I really like the design, macdoc, particularly the breezeways and separate bedroom modules. I'm watching this thread with keen interest as we'll be doing something similar in the next 3-5 years. Is it not common there to raise the house on stilts?

I've been looking at geodesic domes, I like the ease of construction and huge interior space.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. - Mark Twain
The sky is falling! The sky is falling! - Chicken Little
I never go without my dinner. No one ever does, except vegetarians and people like that - Oscar Wilde
User avatar
laklak
RS Donator
 
Name: Florida Man
Posts: 19645
Age: 65
Male

Country: The Great Satan
Swaziland (sz)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#26  Postby Macdoc » Jan 15, 2017 4:46 pm

We had a look at a similar kit house via photo and while we liked the design - it also had wings...the reality was bit grotty in terms of quality of build.

Queenslanders on poles ...low or high are generally not built these days as new but are often moved.
In flood prone areas

Wooden houses which we would prefer but cannot afford to build new....wooden pole houses....are built off the ground and most prefabs.

We could do with this - a mix of steel frame and wood.

Image

http://www.prebuilt.com.au/our-houses/c ... -victoria/

Daylesford House, Victoria
A custom designed Breeze style house.
This country prefab home is situated on a spectacular rural site in Victoria’s Central Highlands, built for a couple living on their own. The owners each wanted their own equally-sized master bedroom quarters, with the design using long offset bays to position these retreat areas.
The middle of the house became the open central zone, and includes the shared kitchen, living, study and library areas.
With the stunning surrounding landscapes, key views of the site are referenced in the house design. A full-height dormer window in the study looks out onto a stunning old gum tree, while views to the dam are framed by a big timber picture window in the living space. The deck wall also features a window cut-out for both seating and further views of the dam.
Old fencepost timbers are used as a framing device outside of the dormer windows, while corrugated steel acts as rural vernacular covering the exterior and roof in a striking dark grey hue. The house is further grounded to the site with stone retaining walls and landscaped embankments.


Much will depend on the cost of the site what we can afford ....at the moment we are leaning towards houses already built to fit our budget. It is much fun designing what we want and we generally agree on designs we like or dislike.
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 15763
Age: 72
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#27  Postby felltoearth » Jan 15, 2017 4:49 pm

tuco wrote:Hopefully I am in the right thread:

Designed for the kitchen, Zera[TRADE MARK SIGN] Food Recycler reduces food waste by over two-thirds its original volume through a fully automated process. The result is ready-to-use fertilizer within 24 hours* that you can spread on your lawn, outdoor plants, and garden, making Zera[TRADE MARK SIGN] Food Recycler the easy-to-use solution for sending less food to the landfill, and more to your land.


https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/zera ... cling--2#/

That's a good product for the suburbs. Most rural people already have plenty of space for a compost heap. In the city you generally don't have any land to add compost to. In Toronto the city has a food waste collection program already. Food waste collection includes many things you can't put into a typical compost like meat scraps.
"Walla Walla Bonga!" — Witticism
User avatar
felltoearth
 
Posts: 11617
Age: 52

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Sustainable house planning

#28  Postby tuco » Jan 15, 2017 6:34 pm

Good point. Let me quote from the link: Requires manual heap maintenance, tho ;) In this sense its a time-saver, at some cost. btw it has 24h cycle which seems to good to be true.
tuco
 
Posts: 15246

Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#29  Postby felltoearth » Jan 15, 2017 9:16 pm

Looking at the video it seems to mix and heat the scraps speeding up the process. But 24 hours does seem like a shoirt period of time.
"Walla Walla Bonga!" — Witticism
User avatar
felltoearth
 
Posts: 11617
Age: 52

Canada (ca)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#30  Postby archibald » Jan 16, 2017 12:58 am

Macdoc wrote:Jude is a research nurse and admitted OCD....we tolerate each other's foibles and meet in the middle on the kitchen tho I do think I'm more flexible....0:)


I have to smile. My partner, of 30 years (23 married), now that our kids are of a certain age (youngest 18) wants us to separate, but stay good friends. At the moment, we're bidding on a small urban site which might suit two small detached dwellings (in approximately an L-shaped form on plan) right next to each other. It threatens to be a very interesting arrangement.

She's not exactly OCD but does really really like a clean and tidy house. :)
Last edited by archibald on Jan 16, 2017 1:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
"It seems rather obvious that plants have free will. Don't know why that would be controversial."
(John Platko)
archibald
 
Posts: 10278
Male

Country: Northern Ireland
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#31  Postby archibald » Jan 16, 2017 12:58 am

There was a regular poster at secularforum.com who built himself something like what you are aiming for, in Australia, fairly recently, Macdoc.

He uses a spare bedroom for airbnb.
"It seems rather obvious that plants have free will. Don't know why that would be controversial."
(John Platko)
archibald
 
Posts: 10278
Male

Country: Northern Ireland
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#32  Postby Macdoc » Jan 16, 2017 1:28 am

We considered AirBnb...Jude is okay if it is seperate unit aka granny flat.
Travel photos > https://500px.com/macdoc/galleries
EO Wilson in On Human Nature wrote:
We are not compelled to believe in biological uniformity in order to affirm human freedom and dignity.
User avatar
Macdoc
THREAD STARTER
 
Posts: 15763
Age: 72
Male

Country: Canada/Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#33  Postby Nicko » Jan 16, 2017 9:30 am

What are you planning on doing with the land surrounding the house?

It's just that I note you're in a pretty good area for a permaculture based garden.
"Democracy is asset insurance for the rich. Stop skimping on the payments."

-- Mark Blyth
User avatar
Nicko
 
Name: Nick Williams
Posts: 8628
Age: 43
Male

Country: Australia
Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#34  Postby Sendraks » Jan 16, 2017 5:50 pm

This may not be relevant to the design, as I suspect Mac is bothered by this less than I am so its probably not a concern of his.

Is it even possible to spider proof the house? Is that something that can be incorporated into the design, were it desirable or necessary?
"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

"'Science doesn't know everything' - Well science knows it doesn't know everything, otherwise it'd stop" - Dara O'Brian
User avatar
Sendraks
 
Name: D-Money Jr
Posts: 15139
Age: 103
Male

Country: England
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#35  Postby Scot Dutchy » Jan 16, 2017 7:04 pm

This thread is like talking about luxury cars. Sustainable housing is only important in highly dense occupied areas not the outback of some god forsaken back woods. If we all had a hectare to build house land would be in very short supply.
Myths in islam Women and islam Musilm opinion polls


"Religion is excellent stuff for keeping common people quiet.” — Napoleon Bonaparte
User avatar
Scot Dutchy
 
Posts: 43008
Age: 70
Male

Country: Nederland
European Union (eur)
Print view this post

Ads by Google


Re: Sustainable house planning

#36  Postby Sendraks » Jan 16, 2017 7:38 pm

How about you go police the content of another thread Scot, instead of trolling this one?
"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

"'Science doesn't know everything' - Well science knows it doesn't know everything, otherwise it'd stop" - Dara O'Brian
User avatar
Sendraks
 
Name: D-Money Jr
Posts: 15139
Age: 103
Male

Country: England
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#37  Postby OlivierK » Jan 16, 2017 7:52 pm

Sendraks wrote:This may not be relevant to the design, as I suspect Mac is bothered by this less than I am so its probably not a concern of his.

Is it even possible to spider proof the house? Is that something that can be incorporated into the design, were it desirable or necessary?

It's not possible to completely spiderproof a house, but you can still design to make it harder for them by having as few entry points as possible. we've got a few places where beams intersect our ceilings and I haven't finished the trim carpentry around them, so there are gaps into our roofspace, so we get lots of spiders, which control our insects to a degree. Cleaning out their webs is a bit of a pain, but on the whole we feel we come out marginally ahead. Gapped floors on verandas, enclosed or open, are also an invitation to spiders, but you can put a fine mesh (like flyscreen) under them.

On a more pragmatic level, people who don't like creepy-crawlies of any description should probably not build their house in areas like the ones Macdoc and I live in Australia. I'm looking out my window at a rainforest. There's so much life, plant and animal, here it's not funny.

Scot Dutchy wrote:This thread is like talking about luxury cars. Sustainable housing is only important in highly dense occupied areas not the outback of some god forsaken back woods. If we all had a hectare to build house land would be in very short supply.

Yes, sustainable housing is important in dense urban contexts. To leap from that to saying that it's unimportant in a rural context makes no sense. If I'd built my house without the shading structures that keep it cool, I'd need air conditioning, and my power comes from the same grid I'd use in a city. More land area actually gives you far more scope for unsustainable practices, especially in terms of overbuilding for your needs, than a smaller plot, and so it's necessary to be more mindful of sustainable design where its not forced on you to a degree by site constraints.
Last edited by OlivierK on Jan 16, 2017 7:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
OlivierK
 
Posts: 8830
Age: 53
Male

Australia (au)
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#38  Postby tuco » Jan 16, 2017 7:52 pm

Only if you could apply your righteousness more equally (unlike selectively), Sendraks, then I could start to respect you ;)

On topic, kind of.

Scot Dutchy wrote:This thread is like talking about luxury cars. Sustainable housing is only important in highly dense occupied areas not the outback of some god forsaken back woods. If we all had a hectare to build house land would be in very short supply.


Indeed, not all can be lucky/have the luxury of having hectare to build a house and even if we would have we would destroy much of landscape as you noted. However, sustainable housing is closely related to sustainable living which, from point of view of survival of our species, is necessity not a luxury. Perhaps better yet, when one has the luxury and hectare, why to build anything else but sustainable/passive house?
tuco
 
Posts: 15246

Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#39  Postby Sendraks » Jan 16, 2017 8:09 pm

OlivierK wrote:On a more pragmatic level, people who don't like creepy-crawlies of any description should probably not build their house in areas like the ones Macdoc and I live in Australia. I'm looking out my window at a rainforest. There's so much life, plant and animal, here it's not funny.


I concur. I don't think its realistic or practical to move to a part of the world with a lot of wildlife and then expect to be able to keep it at bay to suit human whims. I wouldn't want to do that but, I can't cope with spiders either. And thus, Australia is not the place for me. :(
"One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion." - Arthur C Clarke

"'Science doesn't know everything' - Well science knows it doesn't know everything, otherwise it'd stop" - Dara O'Brian
User avatar
Sendraks
 
Name: D-Money Jr
Posts: 15139
Age: 103
Male

Country: England
Print view this post

Re: Sustainable house planning

#40  Postby tuco » Jan 16, 2017 8:24 pm

I guess you need something like this:

Image

just move it further ;)
tuco
 
Posts: 15246

Print view this post

PreviousNext

Return to Technical Design and Engineering.

Who is online

Users viewing this topic: No registered users and 1 guest