Pride and Prejudice

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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#41  Postby j.mills » Apr 08, 2010 5:21 pm

Perhaps it's that her books have female leads...
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#42  Postby Hollis » Apr 08, 2010 6:18 pm

Maybe, just maybe, it's because they are marketed as books for girls? The content itself is largely irrelevant since the majority of people don't read and the works of Miss Austen are included in that huge reading gap, of course. The books nearly always have unbearably girly front-covers with praise from women. The literature teachers are nearly all women who recommend that literature students (mostly girls) pretend to read books by Jane Austen and I think in all this marketing and academic theorising, many potential male readers (it's a small group, I know) are somewhat put off and go and watch the football or read jizz-rags like Nuts, or whatever it is they do. Of course, it's a shame that many males (even if they are habitual readers) tend not to read Austen, but I put that down at least in part to the way that they are marketed and discussed. The mostly awful TV adaptations (useful for female literature students who need to pretend that they have read Austen to impress their teachers and gain bookchat credits) just add to the ridiculous belief that Austen's books are ''girly''. So it goes.

I can say that there are excellent novels that can be enjoyed by anyone who appreciates good books (unfortunately, most of the students who are made to read them are not included in this category). If you don't, don't read them.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#43  Postby cherries » Apr 09, 2010 1:14 pm

well jane austen was a woman and a woman of her times,she looks at the world from that viewpoint.
it's just a question if male readers are interested to immerse themselves into that world.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#44  Postby Julia » Apr 09, 2010 1:35 pm

cherries wrote:well jane austen was a woman and a woman of her times,she looks at the world from that viewpoint.
it's just a question if male readers are interested to immerse themselves into that world.


Yup. Unfortunately, it's a fairly well-known fact that females are, in general, willing to read books about men, but the reverse isn't true.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#45  Postby cherries » Apr 09, 2010 3:27 pm

true,for fiction anyway.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#46  Postby j.mills » Apr 10, 2010 8:40 pm

Julia wrote:females are, in general, willing to read books about men, but the reverse isn't true.

That's 'cos, ya know, wimmin are into gossip, but men aren't into shoes.

[Notes horrified silence. :shock: Sidles off...]
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#47  Postby locutus7 » Apr 10, 2010 9:34 pm

I'm going to generalize here, but younger people, like the original poster, aren't receiving the kind of education that prepares them to enjoy Austen. I'm not making a value judgment; they are probably much better at texting and computer games. Many studies have shown that the average length of sentences has decreased from 47 words to 9 or so, and correspondingly (although there may not be cause and effect), the attention span of younger people has decreased.

I am 60 and, like gallstones, find P&P one of the few books I can re-read with pleasure. But re-playing video games bores me, so there you go. Another geezer bites the dust. :naughty2:
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#48  Postby generalsemanticist » Apr 10, 2010 10:43 pm

I've read P&P 3 or 4 times and all Austen's novels at least once. I've also seen all the different movies and TV series done based on her books. It's fantastic stuff, IMO.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#49  Postby cherries » Apr 11, 2010 2:50 pm

locutus7 wrote:I am 60 and, like gallstones, find P&P one of the few books I can re-read with pleasure.


i enjoy re-reading her slowly as opposed to the first time when i read her rather fast,really just for the plot.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#50  Postby tnjrp » Apr 12, 2010 5:51 am

j.mills wrote:That's 'cos, ya know, wimmin are into gossip, but men aren't into shoes
Well, I for one am into shoes. Provided they have ridiculously high heels and are worn by wimmin, obviously.

Too much information, you say? :shifty:
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#51  Postby Emmeline » Apr 12, 2010 5:32 pm

cherries wrote:
locutus7 wrote:I am 60 and, like gallstones, find P&P one of the few books I can re-read with pleasure.


i enjoy re-reading her slowly as opposed to the first time when i read her rather fast,really just for the plot.
In my experience, 2nd, 3rd, 4th (and more) readings of Austen provide more delights than the 1st readings because as you say, you can do this more slowly and savour the words & wit more.

As for the books being about women, yes the lead roles are female but if you choose not to read the books because of this, you'll miss some of the best / most entertaining male characters ever drawn in fiction: Captain Wentworth, Colonel Brandon, Mr Collins, Henry Tilney for starters.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#52  Postby Katherine » Apr 13, 2010 12:12 am

I think my two brothers are allergic to Jane Austen and all authors of her chronological ilk. Any book (or costume drama adaptation for TV or film) likely to contain a bonnet (headwear rather than automotive) makes the bile rise in their bodies!
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#53  Postby cherries » Apr 15, 2010 3:44 am

Topsy wrote:
cherries wrote:
locutus7 wrote:I am 60 and, like gallstones, find P&P one of the few books I can re-read with pleasure.


i enjoy re-reading her slowly as opposed to the first time when i read her rather fast,really just for the plot.
In my experience, 2nd, 3rd, 4th (and more) readings of Austen provide more delights than the 1st readings because as you say, you can do this more slowly and savour the words & wit more.

As for the books being about women, yes the lead roles are female but if you choose not to read the books because of this, you'll miss some of the best / most entertaining male characters ever drawn in fiction: Captain Wentworth, Colonel Brandon, Mr Collins, Henry Tilney for starters.


mr.collins is terribly funny but apart from her words and humor i like the insight she gives into peoples minds.mansfield park is really like a realistic portrait of that time-period more so than the other books she wrote.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#54  Postby Kelly » Apr 25, 2010 5:54 pm

mark1961 wrote:
Aurlito wrote:Is this book any good? I've read 30 pages and it was all about a stupid ballet and a rich man that danced twice with a girl. will there be any improvements in the story at all?


Yes and it has one of my favourite characters in literature-Mr. Wickham. I find comprehending hundred plus word sentences without modern grammar good practice for filling out most types of form sent to you by the British Civil Service.

I came to P&P a year or two ago after watching the ITV series Lost In Austen. Which it's loosely based upon. Liked the series, bought the book, almost put it down too because I thought Darcy was a twat. I came to warm to all the characters during the course of reading.


I really liked that Lost in Austen series. I rented it because I had just gotten into (finally) Austen's books, having tried to read them for years and just not liking them. Then, I'm not sure why, I tried Pride and Prejudice again, and stuck with it, and ended up really liking it. I haven't read all her books yet, but I intend to, and I've liked the ones that I have read so far.
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#55  Postby cherries » Nov 17, 2011 12:42 pm

Was Jane Austen Poisoned?

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Portrait of Jane Austen based on one drawn by her sister Cassandra. Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin/Wikimedia Commons.

Jane Austen, the author of classics such as "Pride and Prejudice" and "Sense and Sensibility," may have died of arsenic poisoning, according to a crime writer who has reviewed the last letters of the British novelist.

The crucial clue lies in a line written by Austen a few months before her mysterious death in 1817.

Describing weeks of illness she had recently experienced, Austen wrote: "I am considerably better now and recovering my looks a little, which have been bad enough, black and white and every wrong colour."

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According to Lindsay Ashford, a British crime writer, the description matches the symptoms of arsenic poisoning, "which causes skin spotting if taken in small doses over a long time."

"Known as the ‘raindrop’ effect, it causes some patches of skin to go dark brown or black; other areas lose all pigment to go white," Ashford wrote in the Daily Mail.

The crime writer strengthened her theory when she learned that a lock of Austen's hair bought at an auction in 1948 by a now deceased American couple, had tested positive for arsenic.

"The arsenic in Jane’s hair meant that she had ingested the poison in the months before her death," Ashford said.

Austen's untimely end at the age of 41 has long been a cause for speculation among historians.

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Her mysterious and fatal illness was first identified as Addison’s disease, a rare disorder of the adrenal glands; other diagnoses included the cancer Hodgkin's disease, the auto-immune disease lupus, Brill- Zinsser disease (a recurrent form of the typhus the novelist had as a child) and disseminated tuberculosis of bovine origin.

"All these conditions display some of the signs Jane reported, but none matches her description of her face in the letter," Ashford said.

She added that it is very likely Austen was given medicines containing arsenic.

Indeed, the poison was widely prescribed at that time for anything from rheumatism –- something the novelist admnitted to have suffered from -- to syphilis.

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"There is, of course, another scenario: that she was deliberately poisoned. Improbable perhaps; but not impossible," Ashford said.

The crime writer explores the murder theory in her new novel, "The Mysterious Death of Miss Austen," focusing on Austen's family, which she believes is a source of shadows and doubts despite being thoroughly investigated.

"Much is missing. Cassandra (Austen' sister) burnt dozens of Jane’s letters when she died –- no one knows why," Ashford said.

As "letters and diaries cannot and will not tell us what really killed Jane Austen," the mystery over the last chaper in the life of Jane Austen is likely to remain unsolved.

It is quite unlikely that Austen's bones are exhumed for modern forensic analysis, Ashford admitted.

"It would provoke outrage among Austen fans, not to mention the scores of people who claim her as their distant relative. But stranger things have happened. Maybe one day the mystery of her death will be solved once and for all," she said.

http://news.discovery.com/history/jane-austen-poison-111116.html#mkcpgn=rssnws1
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#56  Postby Emmeline » Nov 17, 2011 6:09 pm

This has been in the British press too. The crime writer accepts that arsenic was widely used in medicines but her speculation about murder is just sensationalist nonsense IMO.

Professor Janet Todd, editor for the Cambridge edition of Jane Austen, said that murder was implausible. "I doubt very much she would have been poisoned intentionally. I think it's very unlikely. But the possibility she had arsenic for rheumatism, say, is quite likely," she said. "It's certainly odd that she died quite so young. [But] in the absence of digging her up and finding out, which would not be appreciated, nobody knows what she died of."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/no ... -poisoning
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#57  Postby cherries » Nov 17, 2011 6:48 pm

yeah,i think she might have taken it herself,thinking it would make her better,just ignorance of the times,still happening in a lot of places today with different kind of so called medicines.
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This is because most books on witchcraft were written by men."
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Re: Pride and Prejudice

#58  Postby j.mills » Nov 17, 2011 11:06 pm

Emmeline's prof wrote:"I doubt very much she would have been poisoned intentionally. I think it's very unlikely..."

Ah, but if you were planning the perfect murder, you should choose for your victim someone who is unlikely to be murdered! The more unlikely it is, the more suspicious! :sherlock:
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There is grandeur in this view of life
Where one becomes many through struggle and strife,
But the Mother of Mysteries is another man's call:
Why is there something 'stead of nothing at all?

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